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Discussion Starter #1
I'm trying to decide on a new rifle. I've got it narrowed down to a couple. The first are the Browning Micro Hunter, Composite Stalker, and the Remington 700 DM Mountain Rifle. I already own a Browning Rifle and am pleased with it over the past 8 years.

My main concerns are weight, barrel length and feel, durability (including the quality of the wood stocks), and accuracy. They are essentially a wash on price for the blued models with the Brownings selling for 570-630 and the Remington for about 620 at the online auction sites, shipping included.

I have a gun shop locally that has a pretty big inventory available to check out, so I'm going to go and shoulder the guns personally to check out their feel. If the prices there are close enough, I'll buy here instead of online.

I have a preference for rifles with detachable magazines for convenience. I also like the looks of stainless and the looks of laminated stocks.

I do a lot of walking during the season, so the gun had to be tough enough to be beaten in the woods.

Although I already own one Browning Rifle and am pleased with it, I'm giving preference regardless of price to American made products. I know Remington is located in NY, but can anyone tell me where the guns are manufactured, not just assembled?

Finally, can anyone comment on recoil in these smaller rifles with the 7mm-08 caliber. I do reload and have a tendency to load on the lower end of the spectrum, based on accuracy. I'm probably going out on a limb when I say that I doubt there is a lot of performance difference between the 140g bullet going into a deer at 2700 as opposed to 2500 FPS. Both = dead deer. I know there is a change in the trajectory based on velocity, but at my typical 25 - 175 yard shots between wood lots and across creek valleys, it doesn't really hurt me too much.
 

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Interesting post, you have posed some good questions.

I for one, would not buy the Browning. I think they are still made in Japan and the triggers tend to be pretty bad as well. Also, the ones I have inspected had very short magazine boxes. This means you will not be able to load your ammo out to approach the lands.

I also do not like detachable magazines. Just one more thing to go wrong or to get lost. And I have seen a few that rattled like crazy! Nothing like walking around in the woods trying to be quiet only to have your rifle making noise!

I recently bought a Remington Mountain Rifle, the stainless steel version with the laminated stock. I could not be more pleased. I bought the 7-08 mostly because I wanted the short action, but also because I already had a Remington 700 VLS in 7-08.

My new Remington 700 Mountain Rifle LSS is actually pretty amazing. The only thing I have done to it is adjust the trigger. I mounted a Leupold 2.5 X 8 scope on it and broke the barrel in using the one shot and clean one shot and clean technique. That darn gun has shot a number of three shot groups under an inch. My best so far is with a max load of Varget under the 140 grain Nosler Ballistic Tip. A center to center group of 0.57 inches!

Having said that, factory stuff is even pretty good. Winchester 140 grain Ballistic Silvertips average about 1.25 inches. Remington 140 grain Core-Locts are not very consistant. They average about the same, about 1.25 inches. BUT, I shot one group with the Remingtons that measured a mere 0.61 inches!! (The Hornady Light Magnum ammo is pretty fast, but the groups are about 3 inches)

The recoil with the 7-08 is quite reasonable. I personally find that the recoil of a 308 Winchester in a light gun starts to be a little much, but not the 7-08.

Keep in mind I own and shoot a lot of ammo out of 7mm and 300 magnums and would not trade my .338 Win Mag for anything.

R F
 

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Re: Browning vs Remington

Hello...

I have a Browning A-Bolt Micro in 7mm-08. Personally I think it is a great rifle. Yes, made in Japan, but does that matter? This rifle shoots 1/2" groups with either reloads or factory. I don't find the 'short magazine' to be a problem, and I would not automatically assume it to be so. I only shoot 139gr bullets in it, and just seat them further in the case. A very nice feature of the Brownings is the detachable magazine insert, which can be popped out and put in your pocket. Or the magazine can be dropped down by popping out the floorplate and loading that way.

Experience with Remingtons in that caliber is limited so I can not comment.

My vote would go to the Browning, but Remington is also a good product. My Browning A-Bolt is accurate, reliable, light weight, and extremely portable. All in a caliber excellently suited for medium size game.

Cheers,
Gary
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Well I went to Gander Mountain today to look at the various rifles - the weatherby ultra light was already sold, so I never had the chance to look at it. My impressions and the result:

I must say that I grew up Remington, loving their quality 870 shotguns. Recently, however, after seeing the low priced entries they have put out, and stuck some of my buddies with, I've been deeply disappointed with them. I am definately not a Remington fan.

Th first rifle I saw today was the Remington Model 7, then the 7LS, both in blued finish. I thought the rifle was lightweight, the fit and finish was good on both. The bolt throw seemed short, but rough. I didnt care for the cheesey looking recoil pad, or the wood socks flare on the front end. Ther rifle was equipped with open sights. Overall, it was OK, but did not make me enthusiastic about buying. Saw one in the youth section, but it was the same size as the others for under $300 with walnut stock.

The next model I looked at was the Kimber 84m. It was lightweight, smooth throw of the bolt and smoooth operations. Fit and finish was very nice, No sights. Nice walnut stock. Overall very nice, but $900.

The next model I saw and handled was the model 700 Remington Mountain Rifle DM. I can honestly say that if you are looking at rifles in this category - lightweight fast handling bolt rifles - you should seriously consider this rifle from Remington. The rifle was lightweight, shouldered excellently, had a very nice walnut stock with very good fit and finish, it was atractive in looks. The bolt throw was short and operation was smooth. The barrel was probably 24" long, but didnt feel long. The magazine was nicely done and felt very solid also. Price came in at around $670. Overall a top quality rifle in my opinion, very worthy of a purchase.

The final model is the Browning Micro Hunter. The rifle was lightweight, had a 20" barrel, and detachable magazine. The fit and finish of the rifle was excellent It had a very nice deeply colored stock with checkering which was very sharp and well done. The bolt throw was short, and the operation was not as smooth as the remington mountain rifle. No sights on the gun. Priced at $549.

All of the above rifles were examined in the 7mm-08 caliber. They were all drilled and tapped for scope usage. Only the model seven with plain stock did not have swivel studs installed already.

The Remington Mountain and the Browning A-Bolt II were the finalists. Overall, they were both excellent. I just could not see the difference in price between them. I chose the Browning. I am partial to Browning rifles to start with as I've had excellent luck with the Composite Stalker 7mm Rem Mag Boss rifle I already own.
 

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Great choice mine will shoot 1/2" groups all day with 140 gr.nosler ballistic tips or accubonds & varget powder. I also have one in 223 that shoots just as well if not better. Has me thinking about one in 270 wsm
 
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