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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
what is a bug out bag and whats is in yours??
 

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A bug out bag is.
Well a duffle, back pack (s), Pellican case or rubber maid container.
they are filled with items you will need if you need to leave the house for an emergency.
Riot, flood, mudslide, fire, earth quake, gas leak, chemical spill, or other problem where you need to leave the house in a hurry.
It is usually filled with some food, water, a water purifer, Medicine (needs to be rotated out but if you need a perscription it is in there), First aid kit, $ (if power goes out your ATM is useless), flash lights/ lantern, spare batteries, maybe a tent, firearm, ammo, blades. Enough for 3 days to a week for the whole family. Including Dog / cat or in your case Rabbit chow. with a bowl for them to use for water.
Depending on where you live, how many people you have, what your plan is (based on emergency), Where you are heading, and what the possible danger is is what you are going to carry in your bag.
When I lived on a top of a hill in southern CA every night on my way home I filled my gas tank and would toss my bag in the truck during fire season. That way all I needed to do was toss the dog in and get down the hill. Wild Fire was my only concern. As there were 2 ways down the hill. When I moved a mile away still on the same hill, I now had two horses to deal with and they were part of the plan was to ride them down with the dog. The bug out bag became saddlebags with the plan to ride the horses to my friends barn.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
ok, i was thinking about makeing one. in these time we live in it looks like a good idea. I have lots of packs, we (me and my mom) keep lots of can goods on hand in case of stroms, I guess i need a water purifer, have a good First aid kit already(we get lots of cuts and other things), Have 3 LED mag lights with a 24 pack of batteries, I have only a single shot 50cal black powder gun but lots of ball and shot for it, I own all kinds of blades big and small, about 2 grand in cash is kept in my safe for other uses.


what else would a need for a Urban kind of rural on foot bug out.
 

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It would depend on where you live and what your major threat is.
I would look to keep the packs as light as possile. You don't need every knife you own in your bug out bag.
I would look to get a water purifyer. keep a few water bottles around and cycle them out every 4-6 months.
MRE's or other camp food would e a good idea.
Again this is based on three to five days.
I would also have a plan for a place ot go and how to get there. If you are on foot then if you think there will be a bug out for a storm I would go early and use public trasportation. Bus, cab, train.
In case of a riot I would look to stay put and wait out the problem.
 

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I actually start with the minimalist on-foot scenario, then work up ... as in make sure you have the absolute worst case scenario addressed FIRST. call me crazy ...

what else would a need for a Urban kind of rural on foot bug out
Mindset is first; watch the homeless. No, not the ones with 3 shopping carts ... they're still caught up in materialism. Watch the dude with the ratty Jansport school bag he'd kill someone for before he gave it up. Chances are he's got the means for shelter, fire, food and water in there. His survival weapon may be a B tip phillips with a nice clingy rubber grip. His shelter/blanket may be a couple of hefty bags or a tarp. His kitchen may be a coffee cup and his screw driver. It was 86 degrees today (yeah, I live in Hawaii) and I saw a homeless guy [survivor] with 3 layers of clothes on, and a good pair of shoes. It doesn't take a lot of money or gear to survive.

My foot BOB has at minimum a leatherman, firestarter, steel coffee cup, steel water bottle. I also have a sharpener and a compass (don't need it much in Hawaii). I have a small Bible and a Constitution/Declaration of Independence in there ... society is a nice thing to help survive. Some socks & underwear, some hi-efficiency food, and a small medical kit. Some line. Boresnakes in .22 & .357 rolled up in an altoids tin. Extra ammo, and extra pistol/slide. I'll most likely be in cargo pants with belt & holster so I'll have vital things attached to my person, like a knife, pistol & ammo, monocular. Instant coffee, and as much portable food as I can fit. Nothing that requires batteries in my foot bob ... no tactical lights, flashlights, lasers, gps, scopes. Maybe a crank radio just to keep in touch, but with a headphone adapter so I don't advertise my position.

I live in a place that ranges from 70-85 year round, with free range chicken, mongeese, and loads of fish. Not to mention fruit trees. It rains enough to keep you stocked in fresh water, but never enough to require gortex.
 

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TeamNelson said:
Nothing that requires batteries in my foot bob ... no tactical lights, flashlights, lasers, gps, scopes. Maybe a crank radio just to keep in touch, but with a headphone adapter so I don't advertise my position.
No flashlight? How do you see if there's a tarantula or something coming to get you? :eek:

I have a low-output LED light that will last 60 hrs on a lithium AA batt. At minimum, I'd like to have something like that with me.
 

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Flashlights are a nice to have for sure, but if I figure out how to get by without it, I won't be freaking out when my battery dies and there aren't any replacements. I go like I'm never coming back and nobody's coming to make it all better.
 

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Woodduck, I suppose you know that in a bad tight you can throw open your gate and the horses can take care of themselves in a fire. I am amazed a how many people put themselves in harms way because of their pets. I drive the local ambulance, and we got a call from a camper who thought he was having a heart attack. Got there and the guy wouldn't get in the bus until someone got his friend out of bed in the middle of the night to come out there and pick up his stupid dog.

Guys like this aren't even gonna make the first cut if things get real bad. We got to toughen up folks we are getting to be a bunch of whimps. No offense Woody I see you've got your act together, you've got a specific problem and a good plan if you have the time to implement it. I think a plan is probably even more important than a BOB.

Jamaldog. I guess it depends on where you plan to go if you have to bug out, but for around here if you took a bunch of paper money with you the only thing it would be good for is starting fires. Is it protected in case your pack gets soaked? I guess I'm not much into urban survival, but it seems to me you might be better served if you bought a small pistol and a few silver or gold coins.
 

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bilmac said:
Woodduck, I suppose you know that in a bad tight you can throw open your gate and the horses can take care of themselves in a fire. I am amazed a how many people put themselves in harms way because of their pets. I drive the local ambulance, and we got a call from a camper who thought he was having a heart attack. Got there and the guy wouldn't get in the bus until someone got his friend out of bed in the middle of the night to come out there and pick up his stupid dog.

Yes I know most critters can take care of them selves and I was not worried about the horses especally as they were not mine. but with two roads down the hill I thought they may be a faster and easier way down the hill than waiting in line with all the other people in cars. Figured I would ride the one and the other and the dog would follow.
 

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I don't really have a 'bug out' bag, I do have a 'get home' bag in my car. I work about thirty miles from home with two state forests (Arcadia, RI and Pachaug, CT) between home and work. My thinking being that if an unforseen disaster strikes, I may not be able to drive home and may have to hoof it. I have a first aid kit (which should be in every car anyway) a blanket and raingear. A tarp (handy item to have anyway) some power bars and a few other items. I could walk the whole distance without stopping under normal conditions. I figure under un normal conditions (things aren't normal if I'm hiking home) I could go half way or better, camp out of sight for a few hours, then get home.
 

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Out in our country where it is often miles between towns or even houses those of us who believe in being prepared always keep survival kits in our cars. Usual stuff blankets or sleeping bags, emergency food, knife etc. no guns in this kit it stays in the vehicle all the time and is subject to theft.

One thing I included in the last kit I did was some water. I put it in kink of a soft plastic container because it will be frozen most of the time. That went in a tight plastic bag in case the bottle breaks the water won't contaminate the rest of the kit. I have some girl scout candles in the kit and a tin can with a bail so the ice can be thawed. The plastic water bottle is smaller than the diameter of the can. The water bottle may well have to be cut apart to get the ice out.
 

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jlwilliams said:
I don't really have a 'bug out' bag, I do have a 'get home' bag in my car. I work about thirty miles from home with two state forests (Arcadia, RI and Pachaug, CT) between home and work. My thinking being that if an unforseen disaster strikes, I may not be able to drive home and may have to hoof it. I have a first aid kit (which should be in every car anyway) a blanket and raingear. A tarp (handy item to have anyway) some power bars and a few other items. I could walk the whole distance without stopping under normal conditions. I figure under un normal conditions (things aren't normal if I'm hiking home) I could go half way or better, camp out of sight for a few hours, then get home.
Do you keep hiking boots in the car or do you plan on walking throught the forest in your Wing tips, Caps or Oxfords?
I made the mistake of wearing dress shoes on a job walk one day and long story short I ended up walking 7 miles in my wingtips to get back to my truck. Not so bad as I can do 7 miles no problem and was walking more than that each day in less than 2 hours. My wingtips are comfortable for all day around the office, in the car, and around the city. But My feet were blistered, my shins hurt, and my butt hurt from the hard soles on the dirt and pavement.
I would be crippled trying to walk 30 miles in dress shoes.
 

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Fortunately, I don't wear dress shoes much. I wear work boots or sneakers depending on the time of year. When it's snowing hard i usually put a pair of apropriate boots in the car. Mostly just because I may need to shovel a bit. That's another item in the car, a folding snow shovel. I've dug myself out a few times, and helped countless others. You make a good point, backup foot gear should be in the pack.

A note on dress shoes. If you want a set of shoes that look sharp but are meant to walk miles in, get waiter/waitress shoes. They tend to be basic black dress shoes, in apearance. They have no slip soles and are made to be worn by people who are on their feet and moving all day. They don't usually cost much. I don't have to wear dress shoes often, but I no longer own any other type of dress shoe.
 

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scanners (one way) are always a good idea. the SHTF a plan for are natural (fire, flood and people) so scanners are always helpful to see what, when and where relief will come and also to find out where is trouble and what the law is doing to help or hinder civilians.
 
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