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Discussion Starter #1,021
Thank you, John.S., for your excellent suggestion. The size of the M4 lifting eye is acceptable and I have a quote request in the works. They only show prices for the M8 thru M12 eyes with a price of $3 -$9 for those sizes. Hopefully, the M4 will be 1/2 the cost of the lesser $3 one. We will see. I can ignore minor differences in form and marking. After light sandblasting, the black paint will hide small details and make these acceptable.

Thanks again,

Mike and Tracy
 

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Mike and Tracy

regarding your inquiry about the details. Will you be simulating the rivets as Dom did on the Rockbuster with drilling? This came out really nice on the 100 ton gun and might be a cost effective way of replicating them on the 10 inch gun.

there are a lot of gears with teeth and I noticed one of the wheels/trucks had it as well. this was a feature left off the 100 ton gun and in no way distracts from the beautiful end result.

I’ll put some more thought into it, just my initial thoughts.
 

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Discussion Starter #1,023
Fredstaple, Well Tom, I don't recall where, but I'm pretty sure that I mentioned that we won't be doing anything with the wheels or gears on them or any other gears. They are way, way beyond the budget for this gun and besides, that is where the solid steel wheel shrouds go that will lock the Chassis rigidly to the Pedestal so it can be a NO SHAKE and NO WIGGLE, ACCURATE CANNON.

The drilled dimple faux rivet heads did come out looking very nice on the Chassis and Carriage of the 100 Ton Armstrong Gun that Dom did. We planned months ago to have real rivets on these Woolwich Guns and have already purchased 5,000 rivets which should be enough to do the job. All the exterior surfaces of the Chassis and Carrige will be covered and a few of the bolsters and transom plates will have some rivets as well.

By all means, put some more thought into this. Just because I put the kybosh on your first two ideas, doesn't mean that others will meet the same fate! Except for the rings, we have not put any thought into which of the other numerous details, in these two views, should be included.

Tracy
 

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Discussion Starter #1,025 (Edited)
Thanks, VA Rifleman, I also liked the way those sights turned out. The function was our main criteria on those. The style was copied right off the engineering drawings from one of three heavy reference books we bought on the subject of how the craftsmen at the Royal Armory at Woolwich made all the important parts for the actual gun including the sights. The only thing we made incorrectly on the rear sight prototype was the size of the framework. So, we need to reduce the bulk of the rear sight by 20 to 25% and it should be ready for production. The functional parts of that rear sight, the "V" notch and the brass tip of the front post are just fine and were field tested at our all-day firing tests on our high plains range 90 miles northeast of Denver.

The three photos below will illustrate some items that we must leave undone, because of the inordinate amount of time required to make them and others that we determined could be produced authentically and included with these seacoast guns.


This first photo is of a 10 IN. 18 Ton Woolwich Gun mounted on St. Martins Island in the British Virgin Islands which are due east of Puerto Rico in the Caribbean. It is a contemporary RML Gun to the one mounted at York Redoubt in Canada. Having several alternatives to the attached equipment of our Gun No. 2, it gives us interesting, yet lower-cost choices. We will take advantage of a very important one in that this gun has a movable wooden box upon which to stand if you are an artilleryman loading the gun vs a very complicated, difficult, and time-consuming to make, ironwork, wood platform support.

This Gun also has an essential, Return-To-Battery Carriage Stop, which has 5 large, robust, Rubber Bumpers to keep the Carriage and Gun on the Chassis!! We will be making and mounting this unique feature that every gun had when it was in or ready for action. We will be making and including the Bronze Flange and Trunnion Cradles which are bearings that prevent galling as the Tube is elevated or depressed. The left side footstep will not be included, but the flange forward of that step which lies under the bolted, forward, trapezoidal Chassis support will be. Artillerymen can step on this flange to boost themselves up to the Chassis rails to inspect the rubber Carriage Stop Bumpers or other equipment.

Tracy & Mike







I will have to finish this tomorrow because our internet is unavailable once again. It took Comcast 12 hours to fix the problem last time just four days ago. This is what you get when you have no competition to keep the main provider honest.

The photos below show some features that we are seriously considering for inclusion.


This enlargement of an original, Australian photo is posted here to show you all some of the outstanding details which we will include with this large British RML Gun.
The rear sight shown on the right above has all the features of one we found in our reference book drawing which we used for machining its parts. Forward and Rear sights will be Included with each 10 IN. 18 Ton Woolwich Gun we make.

A functional Elevating Screw and Capstan Wheel under the breech will be included, but the complicated and time-consuming handwheel, the upper end of the rack, and the worm gear will not be included. However, the bronze rod and steel rod have already arrived which we will turn down to make the three gear shaft ends and gear shaft bearings which protrude slightly from the Carriage's right side. A bit of color never hurt an all-black cannon!

The extremely complex Eccentric Axel actuating shaft with sockets and holes for handspikes, partially hidden by the artilleryman on the left, will not be included, but a fully functional Eccentric Axel built like 90% of those in use on seacoast artillery at that time, will be.

The crewman on the right has his left hand on the front wheel hub shown here. These bronze hubs and the large 13 In. bronze wheels behind them, hidden by the hollow Carriage Cheek in this area, will be included with each cannon in a 1.625" dia. size. The bronze, rear wheels were 8 In. diameter originally; ours will be 1.00" dia. and rotate on the Eccentric Shaft.





Looking at one of Spuddy's excellent photos below, you can see one detail that is absolutely essential in that it lies between the Chassis bottom rail and the Wheel Shrouds which take the place of the wheels and gears in this photo. There are four of these parts which we call the trapezoidal Chassis supports. The two at the rear of the gun like these shown here will be made of 3/4" solid 1018 steel plates, cut to a rough shape on our 35-year-old, 14" Rockwell bandsaw, and then finished on our Bridgeport Milling Machine. They and the smaller ones forward will be bolted to 3/16" thick interplates, ( remember the step up for the artillerymen doing inspection and maintenance), previously mentioned? This interplate will be securely screwed to the wheel shroud top.

Above the trapezoidal Chassis supports are numerous handles which are in various locations on the sides and rear of the Chassis. These are placed where a number of artillery crewmen can use them when helping the crew hauling on the pointing tackle point the Tube to the left or right. These are important enough to be included and we will do that if time is available.

Above these handles is a mystery part of very unusual configuration. We believe that it has a dual purpose. It is the rectangular plate with a rearward hook feature which provides additional support for the Eccentric Axel. It also has an integral, truncated, triangular projection which we believe provides impact protection for delicate items like Eccentric Axel ends and associated bearings, as well as impact protection for elevation gear axel ends and associated bearings above. Despite some intricate machining and installation time, these will be included.

Rivers of rivets and buckets of bolts will be included on your Big British Seacoast Gun. We have mentioned rivets before more than once, but I don't think anyone told you that where you see a bolt in an original photo, we will try our best to include one on your gun in that area as well. Only where major assemblies come together will these items be functional, but for picture takin and display purposes, they will be invaluable.

Tracy & Mike




 

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Discussion Starter #1,026 (Edited)
I still don't understand why some people will not post their questions or comments in this Build the Big British Seacoast Gun thread. It must have something to do with their sense of privacy. After all, an email is certainly more private than a thread posting. Anyway, he was wondering how we will open up a recess for forward and rear wheels in the Carriage which is an excellent question. If you look at the last photo posted yesterday of the rear wheel recess, you can see that the original recess was fabricated and the same goes for the front wheel recess just posted today. Because we are making the Carriage from solid, 1012, hot-rolled, low carbon steel plate, we have only one option; we must machine the recess. In the photo below you can see exactly how large this recess must be to fit the larger front wheel which was 13" in diameter on the original Carriage and 1.625" dia. on the one we are making. The row of rivets with the large radius defines the void which will be created with a 1/2" dia., solid carbide, end mill in the Bridgeport quill.





In the photo below you can see these large recesses from in front of the Carriage. The original Carriage cheek was 6" thick with half-inch thick walls and a 5" wide void. After end milling our 750" thick plate, our void will be .500" wide with .125" thick walls, slightly under scale for safety. The bronze wheels, both front, and rear will be .490" wide so they can rotate freely in the .500" gap.

This photo is interesting in that it also shows features of two large riveted transoms, the upper one on the Carriage with its very large radius which allows clearance for the Tube and the one below in the Chassis, 12" high with a reduced height area 8" high to allow room for the forward end of the Hydraulic Brake tube, bolted to the Carriage bottom, to pass overhead. as you view the picture above, you can see where the transoms are located in both the Carriage and the Chassis. Verticle lines of bolt heads define these locations such as under the Trunnions on the Carriage and at three locations on the Chassis, equally spaced along its 15 foot length, (scale length of 22.50").

I really hate to admit this, but I have, up until today, missed one of the most important features that this Carriage has and it is clearly in view on the original Carriage in the photo below. We call this feature the left and right Carriage Retainer Bracket and there are four of these per Carriage, two in front and two in the rear of the Carriage. Follow the bottom edge of that plate from the person's index finger over to where the plate's bottom edge overlaps the upper, interior edge of the Fish Belley I-Beam on the right. Do you see that angle iron, bolted to the plate with its other edge downward?? THAT'S IT!! This is how they made the Carriage slide along parallel to the I-Beam Rail edges on the left and the right! Without these critical angle irons, the Carriage and Tube, weighing over 45,000 pounds would simply slide off the Chassis and crash to the ground, BAD, VERY BAD!!!

We will skip this critical angle iron on the scale guns we are making and trust to luck that the Carriage and Tube won't slide off and put a large hole in your home's floor. Stop hyperventilating, .................................................................................................JUST KIDDING: We won't do that! We decided to skip the bottom plate in our construction of the scale Carriage, so we don't have it with which to bolt the angle iron. We would have loved the extra weight to help control recoil, but the thought of securing it to the left and right cheek bottoms with umteen screws was a definite turn off. We will instead create four, 1/4" thick, robust, verticle, Carriage Retainer Brackets, 1.50" high and 3" long and securely install them behind the forward and rear transoms, two in front and two in back. The Carriage is 10.875" long.

Mike and Tracy


 

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Discussion Starter #1,027 (Edited)
It can be said that I never ignored a backside in my life, but, up until now, I have done that right here. I will post just one more pic to correct my inattention. Don't worry, no need to ban the kiddies from the room: its Not that kind of backside! Just more proof that we are striving to make these as accurately as we can, true to the dimensions that made them noticeable, and able to lead the pack of Seacoast Guns that have PRESENCE. Looking at the right rear view of our No. 2 York Redoubt, 10 In. 18 Ton RML Mk. II Woolwich Gun, you can see where the all-important 6 Inch, (3/4" scale size) width of the Carriage Cheek came from. You can see also that the size of our milling machine job with the solid carbide end mill will not be so prodigious either. There is much less to hollow out, due to the prefabrication of that area. We also scored a definitive length on the protective projection near the right side, hook/slot, seat of the Eccentric Axel which is also 6.00" on the original, (.75" scale size).

 

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We also scored a definitive length on the protective projection near the right side, hook/slot, seat of the Eccentric Axle which is 5.5".

I'm not what this is the dimension of; 5 1/2" on the tape measure does not seem to be a relevant number.
 

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Discussion Starter #1,029
GGaskill Quote: "We also scored a definitive length on the protective projection near the right side, hook/slot, seat of the Eccentric Axle which is 5.5". "

Please, go back to the last modern, posted photo provided of the No. 2 Gun in the York Redoubt in Canada shot by Spuddy, (photo of Carriage right rear, shot from near ground level). This quote is nearby:

"Above these handles is a mystery part of very unusual configuration. We believe that it has a dual purpose. It is the rectangular plate with a rearward hook feature which provides additional support for the Eccentric Axel. It also has an integral, truncated, triangular projection which we believe provides impact protection for delicate items like Eccentric Axel ends and associated bearings, as well as impact protection for elevation gear axel ends and associated bearings above. Despite some intricate machining and installation time, these will be included."

I made an error initially by counting from the 7" marking on the tape measure and going outward to the 12.5" mark. I forgot to include the baseplate thickness for the projecting "truncated triangle" shaped projection which is approx. 1/2" thick, making the whole 6.0" long. I did edit that recently, within the last hour or so.

Hope that clears it up.

Tracy
 

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Discussion Starter #1,031 (Edited)
I guess that I don't look at those figures often enough, DD. I remember when the views went past 80,000, but I was oblivious to the subsequent 2,000. I have here another question via email. I am not complaining, but I would rather see these questions or comments posted on the thread.

Anyway, here goes: Nate writes, "Can you tell us what equipment goes in all those empty holes on the carriage side view?"

Yes, I sure can because I have been studying this British blaster long enough to have seen or at least read about all of that missing hardware. I will bring that image forward so you all can refer to it conveniently.

Starting with the right-hand hole in the three-hole pattern in the upper rear of the Carriage and then going around counter-clockwise we have a Rotating Retaining Roller to keep the Rack in position against the Spur Gear with the Axel and the Bronze Bearing showing. To the left you have the Spur Gear which engages the Rack Teeth, and the Axel and Bronze Bearing showing. Then you have snaggly tooth Worm Gear with the Axel and Bronze Bearing in view. Then there are several Rivets missing which will be replaced.

Next, below that area we have the 8" dia. Bronze Rear Wheel partially showing and also the Wheel Axel and Bronze Bearing and Hub. Ahead of that you have an empty square hole for the Rear Wrought Iron Screw Eye. And directly under the Trunnion you have the Front Wrought Iron Screw Eye and a missing Rivet. Immediately to the right, you have the large, Bronze, 13" Dia. Front Wheel partially showing, Steel Wheel Axel end, and Bronze Bearing end, and the 5" Dia. Bronze Hub and two Hub retainer screws. Up, and to the far right, is a broken off Hook Shaft and two inches to the left, another missing Rivet. That's It......for today.

Mike and Tracy







In the photo below you can see an intact hook and shaft to the right and the broken one to the left. Also, this is a very clear picture of the Rifling form with very narrow lands and very, very, very wide grooves. These guns had seven groove, right hand, gain twist rifling.

 

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These diagrams also might help illustrate some of the items on the side of the carriage:
248452

This is a different carriage but similar items.
248453


248454
 

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Discussion Starter #1,033 (Edited)
Congratulations, Fredstaple. Tom, you provided, in the first drawing posted, a visual representation of a part that we have been looking for since we started to study all these photos that we have found online and received from Spuddy after his trip to Nova Scotia. I am busy tonight, but early tomorrow I will collect the appropriate photos and a hardcopy of the drawing you posted at the top and everyone will know EXACTLY how much we Thank You for posting those important documents. I will do a mock-up of the entire area around the 8 In. Dia. Rear Wheel and show everybody what this essential part looks like and its very critical location. We knew what the last inch and a half looked like, but not what the form the first 10 In. took or how this essential part was affixed to the Carriage Cheek.

Now we do. THANK YOU!!

Tracy

I'm still working on personal business Thurs. morn. and will be until late tonight. Tomorrow three of us are going shooting for the day at our high plains range for a long-anticipated adventure with Mike's new Oval Bore gun in which no rifling is apparent, but the mirror-bright bore looks unusual or weird. We will find out if the "weird bore" gun is accurate or not. I will be doing the mock-up and sketches of the 10 In. 18 Ton "mystery part" sometime on Saturday. The results will be right here Sat. evening.
 

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Discussion Starter #1,034
Very busy day; I can finish the mockup early Sunday aft. Without the multi-piece mockup, the explanation would be too text-heavy. Too voluminous. This mystery part is absolutely essential to the position and function of the Eccentric Axle. If this part was a piece of cord it would have numerous coils, convolutions, or windings.

Tracy
 

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Tracy

these wonderful drawings are contained in the gun manual. I‘ll attach to another post here the full drawing Tomorrow. Just to confirm it is the Parpet C Mark I.
 

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Here is the complete plate from the Handbook for the 10 inch Gun for those interested.
248492


The level of detail on these plates are great. Below is a section of the Dwarf D and the drafter‘s level of detail extends to drawing one of the cap square retaining pins removed from the side and dangling by it’s chain. Great attention to detail!

248493
 

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Discussion Starter #1,037 (Edited)
Thank you, Tom, there is quite a bit more detail in the latest drawing you posted. They got the position of the Rack Retainer Roller correct on that one, on the far edge of it rather than the middle of the rack which Did Not make any sense what-so-ever. The rubber bumper was omitted, however, and we know from studying many drawings that it was a later Addition and should be included. This is a working Sunday for Mike and me as all maintenance happens on Sat. or Sun. Our Air Compressor is down again with an air pressure switch gone bad this time. The main motor cut out at the very beginning of the turning of the Main Reinforce section on Tube No. 1, interrupting Mike once more. There is quite a bit of wiring involved, so I have been pressed into service so we can determine exactly what must be ordered to replace the problem assy. Mike told me, "Don't worry, I will help you make your video when we finally get this figured out."

These things always turn into more than they first appear, so I'm not too sure about wrapping up my mystery part project tonight. I am hearing more bad words from Mike who is outside in the cold, very smokey, air fighting the switch and triple lock switch cover on the compressor. I am going back to drafting for a while to see if I can make any progress.

Maybe later, maybe Monday; it really bites when real work supersedes playwork!!

Tracy

P.S. It's an hour later now and I just went out the back, north door to see how Mike was doing and the air is much much clearer now. Mike is still fighting the covers and has had to remove all of them including the big one over the entire compressor guts section where the action takes place, What a pain!

There is a huge plume of dark, black-gray smoke cascading over the mountains between Longmont, 20 miles north of us, and Fort Collins, 40 miles north of us. It looks like it is 2 to 3 thousand feet high and at least 5,000 feet wide. The rest of the Front Range is clear, making this huge plume even more startling. It's the largest Forest Fire in Colorado history, they say. Let's hope the wind stays northerly!
 

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M&T

i hope the fires come under control soon. What a year.

I have a couple questions I was hoping you might shed some light on. The first invokes a 10 inch Gun, but not the model you are building in this project. In the attached detail drawing of the vent, there appears to be a device that sits at the opening, what is this? These were on the Mark III and IV Guns which were converted 9 inch to 10 inch guns that I think were used basically for firing at a great angle upwards much like a mortar. Was it a device to hold the wires in place as the tube was elevated into firing position?
248504
248505
 

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The second question involves this plate, there is a device that is inserted into the tube and held in place by expanding within the tube.
248506

what is it used for?
 

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Found this information on plate III. An aiming tube. Was it an apparatus sighting in the gun?
248513
248514
248515
248516
 
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