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Discussion Starter · #1,121 ·
I've sent the Gun Position table maker three emails now and still no reply, so please publish his business street address here so I can send him my check and note. Thanks.

Tracy
 

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Good morning,
Here is the mailing address for Keven.

Hi Tim,
The mailing address here is:
Higgins Fabrication
40 Johnson St
Bangor, ME 04401

We're going to be building your piece this week, and should have it ready early next week. I'm really sorry about the delay on that. Apparently I WAY overbooked dec/jan, and we've been playing catch up.
Keven
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,123 ·
Thanks Tim, I will write Keven this weekend.

Tracy
 

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Darn it looks like they are trying to lower the limit on stimulus money. If they do that I will have to dive into my 401K to buy the table. Oh what heck, I was going to dip in to it anyway to pay off the Seacoast Boys...

I can save $200 shipping by picking the table up at Fedex in OKC instead of having it delivered to the house, but the transmission on the F150 went out. F-O-R-D- Found On Road Dead. 20 years and 246,000 miles and the transmission goes out-what happened to Ford quality-Job 1!
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,125 ·
Mike has drilled and bored the first Trunnion hole on the milling machine and it is 1.4975" dia. So, pretty soon we will have a few pics. We also found 36" of Trunnion stock, 1.625" dia. so the first one of these can be turned down to exactly 1.500" dia. Note to self; buy more 4150 steel.

Tracy
 

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Sounds like things are getting back on track after all your problems last year. Love the updates on machining, wish I knew more about it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,127 ·
We are glad you like the updates, Little Seacoast. I remember how intimidated I was the first time I saw a Bridgeport Milling Machine when I walked in to the Colorado School of Trades 45 years ago. They weigh 2,200 pounds but only stand about 7 feet tall. It looked 15 feet tall to me. I looked at all the cranks and dials and thought, "how will I ever learn to operate this monster?" Well, I did and all the other machine tools as well.

Things are not quite on track yet. Mike will not use the hydraulic lifting table that I bought for $467 and now has back problems this week adter lifting the first one on Friday. I can buy these things, but I cannot force him to use them. He is feeling better today, so we will see if more than the first one can be drilled. I have to encourage him to make a couple wooden bridge things so these heavy Tubes can be rolled into place on the Lift and off of the Lift onto the Mill table.

And so it goes at Seacoast Artillery,

Tracy
 

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Good evening,
I picked up the stand that Keven made for me. It is 27 inches to the bottom of the angle iron. The platform fits like a glove. I had the darker semi-transparent finish put on mine. I chaffed it a bit when I slid the platform across it. I am very happy with the end result. this stand is extremely rugged it will serve its purpose well. I like that it is simple and not distracting in its design.
Regards
250626
250627
,
Tim
 

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WOW! That looks great.

I am going to get mine shipped to a business and pick it up. Any idea if you think it will fit in a Honda CRV?
 

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Thanks all, I measure the cartomorrow. Worse case I borrow a truck.
 

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Great! I can uncrate it at the shipping company and put it in back of the Honda.
 

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What is the upper picture of on your wall? Looks a little like Gibraltar in the background.
 

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Here is the text:

"10 In. 18 Ton RML MkII Woolwich Gun, S/N 75, Cast in 1870,
Gun No. 2, York Redoubt, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada 17-17-0-0

1/8 Scale, S/N __, Built in 2021 by Seacoast Artillery Company of Broomfield, Colorado"


T&M
I was thinking of adding the following to the brass plaque:

Gun Position No. 2 Built by Michael Elledge of Cypress, Texas

Thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,140 · (Edited)
Tim, thank you so much for showing how well the table by Higgins' Fabrication supports the 10 In. 18 Ton RML Mk. II Woolwich Gun Position. It looks great in that very handsome location. Even Mike said so as he looked at it online. Then he exclaimed, "Tracy, this is inspirational", and with that statement, he marched out to the shop and carefully crafted another Trunnion hole.

Tim, don't worry about those minor scratches. They are hardly noticeable and if you want them to disappear, simply put a bit of black shoe polish on a rag and vigorously rub it into them. Wait two hours and buff gently with a clean cloth and re-apply by gently rubbing the polish into them this time. After waiting for the polish to dry, buff very gently and see that the scratches are now invisible.

It's amusing that you fellows are discussing famous, far off coastal locations. Just about all of us know Cherbourg Harbor's importance to the Normandy landings on June 6, 1944. Utah beach is adjacent to Cherbourg, France and we needed a deep water port to offload thousands of tons of supplies quickly after the beaches were secure. However, getting back to cannons, did you know Cherbourg's significance related to events during the Civil War? The following Sea Shanty should give you a clue:


ROLL ALABAMA ROLL

When the Alabama's keel was laid
Roll, Alabama, Roll
It was laid in the yards of Jonathan Laird
O roll, Alabama, roll

It was laid in the yards of Jonathan Laird
It was laid in the town of Birkenhead

Down Mersey way she sailed then
Liverpool fitted her with guns and men

Down Mersey way she sailed forth
To destroy the commerce of the North

To Cherbourg Harbor, she sailed one day
To collect her share of the prize money

And many a sailor saw his doom
When the Yankee Kearsage hove into view

A shot from the forward pivot that day
Blew the Alabama's steering gear away

Off the three-mile limit in sixty-four
She sank to the bottom of the ocean floor.




In November 1984, French minesweeper Circe discovered a wreck in the English Channel about seven nautical miles off the coast of Cherbourg. Exposed to extreme tidal currents over the years, only the unexposed lower hull and portions of the starboard side of the wreck survived covered by sediment mainly consisting of an abrasive shell hash. In 1988, the first investigation of the wreck led to the retrieval of the ship’s wheel engraved with the motto, “Aide-toi et Dieu t’aidera (God helps those who help themselves),” identifying the ship as CSS Alabama. Subsequent American-French excavations in 1989-1995, 1999, 2000, and 2002 yielded over 500 artifacts including three cannons, ship components, and items of daily life such as flushing toilets, dishes, and bottles.


CSS Alabama artifacts were conserved at Texas A&M University’s Conservation Research Laboratory, where the Museum of Mobile, Alabama gun was conserved, the Archeolyse International Underwater Conservation Lab in France, the Warren Lash Conservation Center in Charleston, and the Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC) Archaeology and Conservation Laboratory (ACL). A majority of the collection is curated at the NHHC ACL, which conducts a further analysis of the collection, monitors artifacts for stabilization, and provides access to the collection for research.

Currently, CSS Alabama artifacts are on display at La Cité de la Mer in France, the Museum of Mobile in Alabama, Maryland Archaeological Conservation (MAC) Laboratory in St. Lenord, Maryland, and the National Museum of the U.S. Navy on the Washington Navy Yard, DC.

Mike and I saw a cannon from the CSS Alabama commerce raider in 2014 while in Mobile, Alabama. It had been recovered from the Confederate raider's wreck near Cherbourg, France by a combination U.S./French deepwater recovery team several years before and was conserved along with other artifacts.

Three of Alabama’s eight cannon were retrieved during excavations: the Blakely 100-pounder, along with its pivot carriage and portions of brass tracks; a 32-pounder of British Royal Navy style; and a Fawcett, Preston and Company 32-pounder. The last one was the one we saw while visiting the Mobile Museum in Alabama. There are five more like it still at the bottom of the Atlantic 7 miles offshore from Cherbourg, France. The deepwater recovery team also found three almost completely intact flushing toilets on board the wreck.

While visiting the Washington Navy Yard's Museum in 2006, Mike and I saw the 100-pounder Blakely rifled shell fired by the CSS Alabama which was stuck in the Federal Ship Kearsarge's rudder post after the battle. If it had exploded, a very different result of that battle may have ensued.


Tracy & Mike
P.S. I just noticed this:

A Fredstaple quote:

"I was thinking of adding the following to the brass plaque:

Gun Position No. 2 Built by Michael Elledge of Cypress, Texas

Thoughts?" That is an excellent idea, Tom. Michael and Cheryl deserve a lot of credit for making such an admirable Gun Position for this large British Seacoast Gun.
 
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