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Douglas,

Did you run screws up through frame into the base to hold the base onto the table?
 

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How do I order a stand ?
 

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This is an interesting chart:

253474

It helps to enlarge it.

M&T have shot scaled shells at steel plate. It would be interesting to scale some targets to these dimensions and see the result. A bit out of my league, but would fascinating to see.
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,205 ·
Fredstaple, Say Tom, if you could interpret the chart figures for the 10 In. 18 Ton Gun at the closest allowed distance, we may be able to create a scaled target of steel armor and oak backing by using a 1:10 scale where one hundred yards would calculate to ten yards for range and, etc. for target thicknesses. We have several rifled cannon available for testing in the 1.000" bore size. It would be nice for a change to have something interesting to work on besides the forever project.

Mike's back is too painfull now for him to continue lathe and mill operation. I finally convinced him to see his doctor and get some x-rays done which they did today. Maybe a trip to the chiropracter is possible after they are examined. He has not been able to do anything for 3 weeks now and our schedule will not stand that much inactivity. Because of the terrific cost involved, I am reluctant to go to outside sources for help with machining. I will do this, however, if forced to. The next time Mike says, "smaller, Tracy, smaller, I will listen."

Tracy
 

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Don't know if lifting heavy iron is the problem, but if so, that is why there are engine hoists.
 

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M&T

I hope for a speedy recovery to Mike’s back.

Looks like the first target was a 100 yard shot with the target being 4 3/4 inch armour plate with 9 inch vertical backing and another 9 inch horizontal backing.

The ten inch gun was a formidable weapon. It held its own on every target except the target with 22 inches of armour plate, 30 inches of backing and another 1 inch of armour. The only gun to penetrate that target was the Rockbuster.
 

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Next, we drill the big one-inch hole through the last large radii on the Cascabel, then we cut double tapers, making the Cascabel a wedge shape, then we drill the vent, and finally, we make and apply the sights. Some pics coming”.

My excitement hearing the tube work is close to being finished is tempered by the news of Mikes back. Don’t know a thing about machining but seems difficult to carefully move 10 heavy tubes in and out of fixtures for each of the upcoming operations.

Hopefully the chassis and carriage parts will be easier to handle though complex in their own right.

All the best to M&T.
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,209 ·
GGaskill, We have an engine hoist in the shop, but just standing next to the lathe and mill is now the problem. To allow that activity, you need some back correction, perhaps a slipped disk type correction. But I am no doctor, so we will have to wait.

Fredstaple, Thanks Tom, we hope for that too. Looks like 1/2" 12L14 steel, 1.00" vertical oak and 1.00" horizontal oak should do it at 10 yards. That should not be too hard to duplicate.

VA Rifleman, Moving the parts in and out of the fixtures is difficult as well as is standing next to the machines for extended periods of time as they are working. The lesser weight of the Carriage and Chassis Assys. will be easier, but their fixtures are far more complex and lowering 35 or 40 pounds into them just right ain't easy! Thanks and very nice to hear from you as well.

Tracy
 

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I will pray for Mike to heal and for his comfort.
Having suffered from slipped disk for many years I know the road he travels . The reduction in range motion from 360 degree spine fusion is every bit worth the elimination of the pain I was experiencing .
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,211 · (Edited)
Double D., Thank you for your encouragement; it means a lot to Mike and I. Mike is feeling much better and with a new multi-adjustable bed and special exercises, he seems to be doing things like lifting and stretching easier. He has a slight limp now, but that is a result of dropping a heavy board on his foot; he really worked it hard, so it was off to the Doc, for more x-rays! No broken bones, but a persistent red and black and blue spot that he has to report on regularly. He did finish the .890" dia. holes in the Cascabel though and is building a taper cutting set-up on the Mill for the two tapered Cascabel shapes along the sides. Photos/Videos are so time-consuming and difficult with YouTube compared to the old GBO M&C system that very few will be coming from our corner. That's really a shame because that is one thing that I really enjoyed.

I have been moved to the backyard because I was making too much noise in the kitchen working on the handles which will be bolted to the Carriage when it is built. Each one has a handgrip part that must be bent twice at 90 deg. using a 16oz. ball peen hammer with the 3/16" dia. pin held in a bending fixture which Mike made for me. Weather permitting, I will be doing these until all 80 are complete. There are eight complete handle units per Chassis required. They will join the rivets, bolts, nuts, rings, hooks, and bushings as details on the completed Carriage and Chassis. Unfortunately, the schedule has been impacted by the illness and injuries we have had. Our new completion goal is now in February of 2022. This is a realistic goal, not some pie in the sky goal, and can be achieved if our capabilities remain the same until the end of that month. If you have any questions, please ask them here; a timely response will be forthcoming as usual. Technical questions ALWAYS have FIRST PRIORITY.

Mike and Tracy
 

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M&T.
Great to hear Mike’s back is better. Don’t say a whole lot, but check in daily to see how you guys are doing.

How did the gun crew use the hooks you were working on a while back?

Va
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,213 ·
VA Rifleman, On page 58 I found the best pic for the hook which is the second one that I posted there. These were used by the artillery crew to haul the Carriage to the front or rear as the case may be. You see, with a hook you don't need a hook at the end of your rope. a simple stretch of rope works just fine as you can either loop it for one crew member's use or you can double team it for a stronger pull by simply flinging the stretch between two crew members up there where the hook can capture it. No need to thread through that way. Quick and easy and twice the power available. With the wheel eccentrics engaged two men could lean on it and haul the 5,000 lb. Carriage and 40,000 lg. Tube wherever it needed to go. Thanks for the excellent question.

Tracy
 

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Double D., Thank you for your encouragement; it means a lot to Mike and I. Mike is feeling much better and with a new multi-adjustable bed and special exercises, he seems to be doing things like lifting and stretching easier.
I take partial credit for Mike's recovery. But tell him enough, it is hard for this old man to get up and down on artificial knees. Will be praying standing up from now on.

. Photos/Videos are so time-consuming and difficult with YouTube compared to the old GBO M&C system that very few will be coming from our corner. That's really a shame because that is one thing that I really enjoyed
.

I fear this is the issue of teaching the old dog new tricks. I am an old dog so you have my empathy. I hate it when they update software. I hate learning new ways when I finally figured out the old ways. But for video's Youtube is great. Youtube takes some getting use to, but once you do it a couple of times you will be fine. If you have problems, you have my number. But quitting ain't allowed!
 

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Mike glad you are feeling better!

M&T, Your response got me wondering typically how many crew did it take to engage the eccentric axel on this size carriage, one man with a lever on each side or would it have taken more on each side. Not sure if your research has shed any light on this.

These actions were a matter of routine for the guns crews of the time, but now 140 years on the minute details are hard to discern. What I would give to travel back in time to watch these guns fired.
254062


please note the diagram Above is a 9 inch gun example.
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,216 ·
Double D., No quitting here and we agree for video, YouTube is just fine, a long routine, but never the less, fine. Mike thanks you and says," Prayer is much appreciated whether delivered kneeling or standing up! No quitters here!

Fredstaple, Although we have not found any written reference or photograph as to how many men it took to engage the eccentric axel on this 45,000-pound gun, the similar size and weight gun we Americans used at that time, the 50,000-pound Tube and 10,000-pound Carriage of the huge Rodman Gun Seacoas100t Mount required only one crewmember on each side according to photos we have seen. The steel handspikes used for this purpose were usually about 5 feet long and the vertical lift was only 1/4 inch between axel centers. The force used during the engagement via mechanical advantage was therefore easily lifted, only about 45,000 lbs X .40 = 18,000 pounds/240( no. of 1/4" in 5 feet) = 75 pounds/2 men or 37.5 pounds each.

Tracy
 

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Tracy,
this is a question I’ve had for a while. How many shots would it take for an experienced gun crew to get on target with this gun?
Regards,
Tim
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,218 · (Edited)
Well, Tim, that is a very good question, but you and others who may be interested will have to bear with me as the only way that I can approach a satisfactory answer is the analytical way. By this, I mean that one must eliminate as many of the variables as possible just as you do when your goal is to have the most accurate rifle in a competition or for your own satisfaction. By variables, in this case, I mean that your rifle has a barrel capable of sub-1 MOA groups at 100 yards, Free-floating wood (if it has wood at all), no loose screws, etc., etc. Ammo should be carefully crafted hand loads, well checked out by actual practice, and carefully measured components with an eye to selecting only those which lack variability in size and weight and fit the rifle's chamber precisely. Of course, your method of shooting should be as repeatable as it possibly can be.

The variables present while trying to get a cannon to hit a target are not quite as numerous, but certainly are challenging. Is the target stationary or moving? If it is moving like a ship going past your fort on a river would be, then you must eliminate as much of the guesswork about the range by having appropriate buoys anchored at regular known distances covering all the navigable water in the river. Also you should make an estimation of the ship's speed as easy as possible by having two or three sets of buoys specifically for that purpose. A stopwatch is started as the ship passes the first buoy in a set of two and is stopped as it passes the second buoy which is a known distance from the first and the elapsed time is noted for the calculation. So, after adjusting the Tube's elevation for the correct range, you must fire at precisely the correct time with the proper lead based on miles per hour(knots per hour) speed of the target vessel for your projectile to connect with the target ship.

Also, there is the powder and projectile loading routine to consider. Any deviation from a prescribed and practiced method will increase your crew's chances of missing. Depending on what type of shell crane your 10" Woolwich Gun has, a muzzle gripper or a rotating, swing into place, Chassis mounted one, the time to handle the 410-pound shell will be different and cause the crew more or less anxiety because this type of shooting is definitely time-critical. Remembering to disengage the eccentric axel before firing is also critical if you want a proper shot that does not damage equipment by allowing the Carriage to run off the Chassis which will turn your happy to be banging away at the enemy day into a day that can aptly be described as a sour, west-Texas owl poo day.

All in all, I bet that two carefully executed shots by a well-trained and practiced crew could do it if visibility were good and wind moderate.

Thank you, Spuddy for a very interesting question!!

Tracy and Mike
 

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Thanks M&T for this interesting and enlightening discussion. I would not want to be on the receiving end of this battery as you tried to transit this narrow channel to Halifax Harbour.

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254125
 

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Some interesting photos:

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254127
 
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