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My entire life I have been an anxious person, Especially when waiting for a gift, present or new toy. The weeks and days leading up to Christmas were unbearable. I would obsess over what gifts I was anticipating by flipping through one of the multiple catalogs that Sears or Montgomery Wards had sent to our home.
Well things haven't changed much except that my toys are more expensive and the way that I obsess over them is now in a digital format. Additionally I have learned to enjoy the anticipation as many times it is the best part of the process. However I have found that getting to see the product go from concept to design and being able to appreciate the time and craftsmanship that goes into to such a piece makes me prouder of it than the immediate gratification of ordering something mass produced and receiving it the next day ever will.
I guess in summation what I am saying is that I'd like to thank Tracy and Mike for making the process of the build and taking the time to share it with us as important as the final end product.
 

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Jfkaboom-69 I'm the same way. I check this post several times a day hoping for a update or photos.
Tracy and Mike thank you for all the updates! We look forward to any future updates and love seeing photos of the whole process

Thanks
Tino
 

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Discussion Starter #64 (Edited)
We enjoy all facets of cannon building incl. bringing the build to you.

Zulu wrote that he could not fit in a 12" dia. bore. All I can say is, "Me neither!" That must have been one skinny aviator.

JFKaboom-69 & Onit12345 We are very happy that you enjoy seeing and reading about the process of each build presented in text and photos. As the title above indicates, we really do appreciate that we must go through all the manufacturing steps incl. research, design, drawing, material selection, prototypes, process planning, fixture design & mfg. and production/inspection. As we go through each stage of product development we accumulate knowledge and photos which we really enjoy imparting to you. Some of you might think all of these steps are not necessary, but we know that they are if your aim is to build the best product that you can within a specific budget. We basically enjoy this work so much, because of the creative nature of it, that we refer to it as our "Calling". The creative nature of it was something we could get little of in our previous corporate inspection jobs, even our 8 year run with our own quality inspection and calibration company allowed for little creativity.

Mike does a lot of research on creative manufacturing techniques and universal fixtures which can be used for a myriad of purposes. He experiments with quite a few combinations of speeds and feeds on the lathe and milling machine before selecting the best possible combination for both efficiency and surface finish. We both know the math too. When Mike was machining the very first of our premium cannons, the M1861 100 Pdr, Parrott Rifle, he had 3 full pages of X Y Z coordinates when making the tube AND trunnions out of one homogeneous piece of 4150 steel. It took three days to finish, but it was perfect when complete, a testament to Mike's superior machining skills and tenacity. Math was my worst subject in High School, but you can learn it if your lively-hood depends on proficiency with it.

I put a lot of effort into making these in-process photos and explanation texts as clear as possible, but sometimes there are things that are difficult to describe. Without bragging, I believe that I do a fair job of taking revealing photos of the parts of the process that are visual. Early on we came to realize that industrial photography is extremely expensive to farm out. Just for one gun show brochure, a photographer familiar with this type of photography wanted 2,800 dollars just to take the photos, we still had to write the copy that tied them all together! Mike and I went out and bought all kinds of powerful lights, soft lights, pin point lights (flashlights). The flashlights, we found, were the perfect tool for illuminating the recessed areas of many cannon areas under the tube. Lots of trial and error here!!!

Onit12345, Thank you very much for bring that technical manual to our attention. We certainly have not seen everything, nor do we know everything about these large artillery pieces. In this particular case, however, we had seen this info several years ago and recently we received this very same, on-line manual from JFKaboom-69. We have used a couple labeled photos from it earlier in this thread. Don't stop looking!! We can use every scrap of info we can get on this topic. We very much appreciate your efforts.

Tracy & Mike


Tired of Black and White photos. Can you imagine the happiness and joy which would expressed by this young Filipino girl if someone had given her a puppy instead of a 12 Inch Mortar Shell???




What Battery Way on Coregidor Island in the Philippines looks like today.

 

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Updated

Serial number list.

1. Spuddy
2. Onit12345
3. Kevin Rohrer
4. JFKaboom69
5. Unnamed Fan of Seacoast Artillery's Cannons
6. Ex 49er
7. Intoodeep
8. Beazld
9. Gregowen
10. Va Rifleman
11. JFKaboom-69
12. Shred
13. P2. Seacoast Artillery
14. Gls
15. Available
16. Available
17. Available
18. GGaskill
19. Available
20. Available
21. Available
22. Available
23. Available
24. Double D

There are 8 numbers available, but only 3 guns left in GBO Cannoners sale. Five guns are reserved for Gun Show Sales.

I get overwhelmed by all the photos and the detail you come up with. I understand your need to to study this sort of thing before you build. That is how you come up with the these incredible models. Don't stop, don't stop for one second. That is one of the things that make these guns so desirable.

I don't have a lot interest in the 12 inch Seacoast Mortar, not my type of cannon. Neither were the Krupps. It is your incredible detail and machining process that draws me to these guns. Absolutely fascinating. When you started this series of guns before that first gun went out your front door in March 2011, I was hooked. If you remember I wasn't in that buy until the very last minute, thus I claim the last of the issue, now I protect that last gun prestige. I don't care what gun you make, the 24th gun is mine and as long as there are not more than 24!

SCA attention to detail, historical research, documented manufacturing process, limited issue and moderate price all contribute to make this series of guns something worth collecting, something that will only gain value over time.

Every time you issue another one of these, as long as I have breath left to breath and cash value in my 401K and you stay under the 1K price point, I will have Number 24, the last gun of each issue in my collection.

Now about that flank howitzer...
 

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Referring to the photo of the M1912 on post #42 [page 5], it's interesting to see how the barrel evolved from built up gun with such a massive diameter breech to a more cylindrical barrel. The recoil assembly went through a bit of a change. I will be following this project very closely. Great Idea M&T!
 

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Hi guys, My vision has returned so I'm back in the cannon buying mode. Please put me on your list for #15. Thanks, Pete
 

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Discussion Starter #68 (Edited)
Thanks Double D., that list is much more clearly understood than mine. Thank you also for explaining why you are a customer and a very loyal one, at that. Your list of all the reasons that make these cannon worthwhile collecting is spot on and I might actually borrow it to make some Gun Show Brochures. Thanks. As for the next one, I am sure that Mike is very serious about his Naval Deck Gun with an interrupted breech and I asked him about its size and price point and for now he is indicating one half again what my grandson's Deck Gun was which was about 7" long, so about 10" or 11" long and about 1.00" to 1.25" at the breech end of the Tube. Yes, he said it would be less that $1,000, but not by how much. I don't think that a flank howitzer is in the cards. I studied that gun quite a bit when we were building the last of the Nano Guns and it's a little SOB as far as weird shaped wood and complicated iron furniture for the casemate carriage that they have, plus to make it really look right, you would have to sub out a portion of a Fortress Casemate with many hundreds of little bricks made of wood and faux painted to Michael in Cypress, Texas, in which to mount your 24 Pdr. Casemate Flank Howitzer. Lord knows how much THAT would cost?? (That last comment ought to get a snappy retort out of Zulu. He He.)

Dominick, Nice talking with you today and we are glad you are busy, because the opposite is not good at all. You are correct about the 12 Mortar evolving quite a bit, I guess I was paying attention to how the hydraulic cylinder and the spring recuperators had changed, but the simplification of the tube shape escaped my notice. Thank you for mentioning that. I am glad we are building the earlier version, it is so much more robust and uncluttered looking.

Little Seacoast, Pete, nice to hear from you once more; we were unaware of your vision difficulties. We hope your cure is complete. Thank you so much for your order; we had such a great time at your beautiful piece of Tennessee at the beginning of our Tour of the Southern States in 2014 that we will always be grateful for you and your wife's hospitality! Your SN 15 is Officially logged in. We hope to get together again if you return to Colorado for some trout fishing and show you what the ole' Spigot Mortar will do out on the prairie. Maybe try out a "Charge 4" to see how far that Bowling Ball will fly!!

Tracy
 

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Serial number list.

1. Spuddy
2. Onit12345
3. Kevin Rohrer
4. JFKaboom69
5. Unnamed Fan of Seacoast Artillery's Cannons
6. Ex 49er
7. Intoodeep
8. Beazld
9. Gregowen
10. Va Rifleman
11. JFKaboom-69
12. Shred
13. P2. Seacoast Artillery
14. Gls
15. Little Seacoast
16. Available
17. Available
18. GGaskill
19. Available
20. Available
21. Available
22. Available
23. Available
24. Double D

There are 7 numbers available, but only 2 guns left in GBO Cannoners sale. Five guns are reserved for Gun Show Sales.
 

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Anybody feel like buying 2 mortars? That would gobble up the available #'s very fast and the serial number can be any number you want. Do I hear #25 or #97 or?
 

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Discussion Starter #71
Ah ah ah, Ex 49er, if I were French I might call you an "agent provacateur". Let's not ruffle Double D.'s feathers unnecessarily. I promised him and also all other members that 24 cannons would be Seacoast's limit on any firecracker cannon build. As an example, if Mike's Naval Deck Gun list fills out in 3 or 4 days to SN 24, we can always build a Series 2 Naval Deck Gun with 7 mounting holes in the base flange of the cone mount instead of 6 and an additional SN series from 1 to 24.
SNs outside of 1 to 24 just cannot be allowed in this system. If this offends your tendency to want to march to a different drummer, I do apologize to you.

Tracy
 

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you would have to sub out a portion of a Fortress Casemate with many hundreds of little bricks made of wood and faux painted to Michael in Cypress, Texas, in which to mount your 24 Pdr. Casemate Flank Howitzer. Lord knows how much THAT would cost?? (That last comment ought to get a snappy retort out of Zulu. He He.)


The cost of many hundreds of little bricks made of wood and faux painted??
Be afraid! Be very afraid!
Sounds like the job would be better served by just using a single board and faux painting many hundreds of bricks on it.

Sounds like a perfect job for my lovely assistant!
I'll go tell her now.

Well, maybe I won't really tell her yet.
Zulu
 

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Faux bricks? Why? Make real bricks, hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of little tiny real clay bricks in a little tiny gang brick mold.

Why for even greater authenticity write the Park Service at Fort Pulaski and ask where the clay for the bricks came from and go get a pick-up load and make real authentic miniature Fort Pulaski bricks.
 

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Discussion Starter #74 (Edited)
Boomerralph where are you ??

In the next up-date we will be showing some details we will create on the 12 Inch Coast Defense Mortar and mention a couple simplifications necessary to meet the $349 price point. Some drawings will be completed by that time as well. The first chips will be produced at the end of this week, when the Tube drawing is complete and as soon as I can get my son to carry the 1018 steel rounds, six feet long into Mike's basement where the bandsaw lives.
Tracy & Mike


 

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Discussion Starter #75 (Edited)
ZERO 12" Coast Defense Mortars available now!!

Ralph Reese just bought both of the available 12 Inch Coast Defense Mortars M1890 A-1 and a New Krupp Gun M1876, one of two we were saving for Gun Show Sales!

THANK YOU RALPH!!

Mike and Tracy
 

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Discussion Starter #78
Hi Tino, I am getting back on it this coming Monday; right now I am helping Mike get his Naval Deck Gun project going, besides I need my son to get back to town to move this heavy steel around so we can get to bandsawing the Tube stock.

Tracy
 

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Discussion Starter #79
We are Working on it: What are YOU Doing?

Like I told ONIT12345 the other day, Monday evening we will be able to post a real update on the 12 Inch Coast Defense mortar M1890 A-1. The tube drawing will be complete and hopefully several tubes as well. YES, we do have all the excuses that you do for doing nothing, but here's the difference, we have decided to get with the building of BOTH of these big projects and NOTHING will be more important. We have carved out certain hours of every day to be dedicated to PRODUCTION, despite any suggestions about Thanksgiving or Christmas. For Thanksgiving, if cooking a Turkey w/o all those vegetables that I hated when I was a kid is too much work w/o my participation, forget it, I will go to the local hotel spread instead!

I am beginning to think that GBO Mortar and Cannon is turning into a typical Private Sportsman's Club where 3% of the members do all the work and the others sit around looking pompous until its all done, but show up for every fun function that others in the club will put on. Somebody better tell us pretty quick if this has turned into a well healed collector's club with no doers in the group. Of course there are exceptions, but very few I'm afraid, very few indeed. I can count the regular builders of large and Small projects on one hand, that's it!!

Do I have to list all the beginner cannons that you can build with nothing more than a hammer, hand-saw and hand-drill shop?? What about the minis and the micros and the nano cannons that quite a few beginners used to attempt on a regular basis. There are several threads that completely list what was done before on those simple, but very cool projects. It only takes a few moments to bring those threads back using rudimentary search techniques. Just DO IT.

Tracy
 

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I am beginning to think that GBO Mortar and Cannon is turning into a typical Private Sportsman's Club where 3% of the members do all the work and the others sit around looking pompous until its all done, but show up for every fun function that others in the club will put on. Somebody better tell us pretty quick if this has turned into a well healed collector's club with no doers in the group. Of course there are exceptions, but very few I'm afraid, very few indeed. I can count the regular builders of large and Small projects on one hand, that's it!!

Do I have to list all the beginner cannons that you can build with nothing more than a hammer, hand-saw and hand-drill shop?? What about the minis and the micros and the nano cannons that quite a few beginners used to attempt on a regular basis. There are several threads that completely list what was done before on those simple, but very cool projects. It only takes a few moments to bring those threads back using rudimentary search techniques. Just DO IT.

Tracy
Actually Tracy, you have hit the nail right on the head. Simple projects. We don't have any simple projects any more. We have some pretty advance and sophisticated builders who strive for authenticity and detail, paramount. I think that scares some of the less sophisticated builders away.

Nobody is turning out simple home shop made cannons here anymore. I'm not talking about nano's and Micros either. Simple 45 or 50 cal. copies Civil war cannons made from Wm. Green Cannon plans and such-the simple small desk top cannon, with a barrel 10-12 inches long. Easy to build, the heaviest machine tool needed a small lathe. Lots guys have lathes and are looking for something to do with them. We have had these small projects in the past. But we have got so hung up on the advanced guns we forgot, not everyone has the skills or tools to build them.

The first real cannon I built was the Wm Green 1841 42 PDR. I built it in 1983. I bought a lathe in August that year. Then in September I went to Gunsmith school and learned to operate the lathe. I was turning this first tube in the evenings after I got home from class using the skills I learned that day. I up scaled the Green plans to make a larger gun than the drawing. You have seen my tube and you know it is pretty obviously made by a novice. But it still looks pretty good. I picked that gun for its Naval style carriage-it looked simple to build. For carriage, I used standard stock wood cut out with hand held saber saw, shaped with rasp and file. I drilled holes with a table top drill press. I did use the mill at school to put the trunnion recesses in the tube. I believe someone, some years ago here, perhaps it was you Tracy, showed us how do the recesses on the drill press. I built the hardware with an oxy-acetylene torch, ball pein hammer and shop vice from mild steel strips and hardware store fittings. Not all the fittings were made at once. When I refurbished the cannon in 2009 I added some additional fittings I had left of the orighinal build. again fabricated from hardware store items. Authentic, no. Look good and right, yes.




I am willing to share the plans with anyone who would a set. If built to the plans it produces a .59 cal barrel 11 inches long. The plans are six, 6.5 x 11 sheets.



My 10 year old Grand-daughter has expressed an interest in making a cannon. This might be a good first project for her.
 
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