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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I bought two of those large 6 lb. food service cans of CB Hash.
One brand was Vanee and the other was Checkmate by Nestle.


The Vanee was just as good as Armour and I thought better than Mary Kitchen.
The Chefmate was heavy with grease and reminded me of Southgate brand, not bad but not as good as the three I mentioned before this.

Fortunately the grease was at the top of the can and I was able to remove most of it.

I got them because at the time the Webstaurant web site offered me as a newly signed member free shipping and at that time they were on sale.
No way I could afford them other wise.
If I had money burning a hole in my pocket I would have bought a case of each and had enough for long , long time.
 

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So the big question is why did you buy all that hash?

Anyway, corned beef hash, as made traditionally with diced pertaters is durned righteous grub, especially when formed into patties and fried until crisp on the outside.

Bob, I met a friend at New Louisiana Cafe in St. Paul and he had their horrendously bad corned beef hash. Avoid avoid! It's not even hash. It's just slices of corned beef that are fried. I had their disgusting eggs Benedict. Terrible sauce. Overall bad bad bad. But very popular locally.
 

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Canned hash can be pretty good, but homemade is where it's at. Nice big chunks of shredded corned beef with fried taters. Damnnn good!
 

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I'm not sure what corned beef hash is.
 

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I know what "hash browns" are.
Are they the same?
Dee, as I see it, Corned beef hash is basically corned beef brisket, chopped quite fine and mixed with about quarter inch diced potatoes.. Then usually fried up separately, and served beside eggs & toast.

There are other ways to serve it, but most often it is served that way. Not quite so common is roast beef hash..where roast beef is used.

Although I suppose recipes can vary slightly, any corned beef I have eaten.. are generally very much alike.

Some photos of same... https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1518&bih=728&ei=TGTVXcacN4izkwWHv5vQAg&q=corned+beef+hash&oq=corned+beef+hash&gs_l=img.1.0.0l10.1222.6333..10652...0.0..0.283.2163.0j14j2......0....1..gws-wiz-img.......0i131.iYFCkqmTr2A

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I'm not sure what corned beef hash is.
Sumpin' you fry up and drop a couple of eggs on! :tango_face_grin:
 

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How do you "corn" the beef?😕
 

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How do you "corn" the beef?😕
You've never had corned beef and cabbage? I'm not Irish, but I cook up corned beef, cabbage and potatoes, chased down by a few Guinness every St. Patrick Day!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
So the big question is why did you buy all that hash?

Anyway, corned beef hash, as made traditionally with diced pertaters is durned righteous grub, especially when formed into patties and fried until crisp on the outside.

Bob, I met a friend at New Louisiana Cafe in St. Paul and he had their horrendously bad corned beef hash. Avoid avoid! It's not even hash. It's just slices of corned beef that are fried. I had their disgusting eggs Benedict. Terrible sauce. Overall bad bad bad. But very popular locally.
I will take note of that.
I like Corned Beef Hash a lot; I have since I was a little boy.

When we were in Canada last week, I ordered Corned Beef Hash special at a place in Windsor called Skippy's which was two eggs, with their home made hash which was sliced onions, shredded potatoes, chopped corned beef and slices of tomato.
Actually pretty good.

Dee:
Corned beef is a beef brisket cured with salt.
Large kernels of salt are used that are called corns of salt.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Brands of Corned Beef Hash, I know of and have tried:
Hormel (Now owners of Mary Kitchen various types)
Libby's
Southgate
Armour
Vanee
Chefmate
Hereford
Brookdale
Great Value
CastleBerry's

Have not tried but will:
Puritan
Culinary Classic
Nalley's
Broadcast
Keystone
Venice Maid
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Bob, are any readily available in MN brands good enough to take out of the can, form a patty, and fry it up good and tasty?
Best two I have had are
Armour
Vanee
Hormel Mary Kitchen comes in third.
I do not know who makes Great Value, but it is at least as good as Mary Kitchen.


Canned hash , from what I have found , comes in two types, not very fatty , very solid type and quite fatty type that literally pours out of the can.
Both taste just fine but I prefer the more solid type.
The only way you will know is buy one can of those you see, and decide for your self; while I prefer the solid type I do add liquid while cooking so it is of the consistency I prefer which depends on whether I eat it with fried eggs, or hash browns.
I have found , cooking it in a large skillet, big enough so you can spread the hash around the edge when done to one's desire and after that fry two or three eggs in the middle which I mix into the hash when done is very, very good.

As most canned hash has a official, shelf life of three years, (having bought Corned Beef C rations in military clearance stores that were far older than that) in the can, I have found spending a seeming large chunk of coin for the big can food service stuff, depending on shipping is cost effective, per ounce, as you can open a can, use what you need and freeze or put in a quality sealed container in the fridge for long , long time.
 

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I use to "corn" moose and caribou quite often, also Sitka blk. tail venison, but I never "hashed" it.


Besides a salt brine, you use some pickling spices including pepper corns and it takes about 30 days for the process to complete.


DM
 

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To do it right you need a small pump the brining solution and a very large brining needle as you need to pump the large piece of beef with the brine not just soak the meat in it. after pumping you place the meat into a large barrel kept in a cooler to soak for about 2 or 3 weeks. When we were in California and there still were regular meat markets where the butcher would cut you a roast or steaks or what ever there was a market that had corn beef, you told the butcher what size you wonted and he would bring you out one. My wife would pick out one take it home soak, it in fresh water for several hours to remove some of the salt, put it on a baking dish place cloves and crushed pineapple on it and bake in oven till tender man it was great. Shure miss those days.

Deaconllb
 

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ive corned a few whitetail hind quarters. Its good but its drier then beef corned. Makes good hash though. With injection and #2 curing salt you can corn in a week.
I use to "corn" moose and caribou quite often, also Sitka blk. tail venison, but I never "hashed" it.


Besides a salt brine, you use some pickling spices including pepper corns and it takes about 30 days for the process to complete.


DM
 
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