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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been using the Hornady btsp bullets for some time now and I am looking to change. Not that the bullets are bad or anything it just that no matter how good I shoot the deer they hardly ever drop, they don't run far but they don't drop. I am a results man myself and I love to watch them hit the ground. I am using 120 grain nosler ballistic tips in my 264 mag right now and love them, nothing has ran yet and have shot several and a variety of ranges. I am just wondering what everyones take on the best round for a Winchester 270 for whitetail hunting might be.
 

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I found that the 110gr. Sierra delivers faster kills than the 130gr. bullet assuming the proper placement of the projectile. I've used it on Pronghorn and whiltetails but would be reluctant to use it on anything larger than a deer.

Do I conisder it a better choice for hunting, NO! I have never happened to hit a shoulder blade but I would be concerned that it would not penetrate it.

Good shooting!
 

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What are you really looking for? I have killed a fair number of deer in the last 45 hunting seasons. And I have seen a lot of deer killed by other hunters. In the 1965 deer season I validated tags on 285 bucks. This also provide me a lot of oppertunity to talk to successfull hunters about there rifles and their ammo. Bullet performance has always been an interest of mine. I always looked at the damage caused by different bullets. A well placed bullet behind the shoulder can destroy the heart, and lungs. The deer can still run a hundred feet or so. Or you can place a heavier bullet through the shoulders breaking them and put a hole in the top of the lungs.

I have successfully used the Hornaday 140 BTSP to kill a number of deer. The furthest I have had one run was about fifty feet. I did get one killed that would have satisfied you. The buck was about 75 yards away looking down a 70% slope at me. I was amazed to see his hoofs flip into the sky from the bullet impact. But that is a rare shot.

Frankly I prefer the 140/150 grain bullets in the .270. This year's deer was at about 225 yards. It was a downhill shot that caught him in the center of the front lower neck, destroyed a lung, part of the liver, and cut five ribs into before coming to a stop under the hide. The 150 grain bullet I recovered wieghted just over 70 grains and had expanded to .75 caliber.

The deer went 75 to 100 feet before dropping.

My point is that you can shot a number of deer behind the shoulder with a adequate round a get a number of different reactions. Now I have got a lot of one shot kills on critters, blowing them to pieces kills on jackrabbits and woodchucks with a .270. I surely would not want the red blob reaction on deer. To have dependable drop them in their tracks kills you must have a round that destroys the deer. I would hate to see that!

Siskiyou
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yea I am kinda leaning toward the ballistic tips right now since I have seen what they did with the 264 mag but I was thinking about maybe trying something different. Always liked the soft points and was thinking about getting some of the Winchester Supreme with the coated soft point, but a lot of people have been telling me the coating is not good for the rifle.....
 

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If you really want to flatten them with one shot, try a .35 Whelen AI or a long throated .350 Remington Magnum with 225 grainers at 2600-2800 fps. Guys on this board who use .35's on deer say it really lays them out. Also there was a guide/hunter named Thornberry in Alberta who wrote an on line summary of his many years of deer hunting and guiding who that the .35 Whelen was tops for slapping down big deer with one shot.

If you're really interested in the .270, why not try some of those 120 grain Barnes X bullets? They supposedly have zero weight loss and you'd probably get at least 3200 fps with that load.

I have loaded some 130 Nosler Ballistic Tips for a hunting buddy (I use only Partitions) with a .270 WCF Mauser 20" mannlicher carbine using 55 grains of IMR 4350 for about 2950 fps of MV. On several hunting trips they've worked like champs for him. He says this hand load (originally worked up by his father in law with Nosler flat base bullets which were discontinued) is more accurate and kills better than factory ammo. I"ve never observed them, but he says they kill like lightening and he always brings a deer back to camp. I've only recovered the base of the bullet jacket, the bottom of the core and jacket fragments so they are obviously very frangible.

As far as butt shots go, I've never taken them with any load in the .270. I did take my .338 mule deer hunting loaded with 250 gr solids just in case. A couple of times in the past I've had to pass on going away shots. Ross Seyfried used that on a caribou that was running directly away and said it penetrated the full length of the animal, exited in the front and that the caribou dropped like sack of potatoes. Fortunately, I got a great broad side shot and used the 250 Partition instead of the solid. He died in his tracks at a measured (laser rangfinder) 301 yards. I may very well stick to my .338 for deer, although a 225 grain bullet might be best. Or maybe a 180 grain .338 Ballistic tip at about 3200 fps. If you really want to flatten them, why don't you try that one?
 

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264 WM,

If you're concerned about having a deer drop right in its tracks, I wouldn't so much worry about the type of bullets as I would the type of shot - I'm talking about neck shots.

I have taken numerous neck shots on deer within 150 yards and have NEVER had one even move an inch! It's instantaneous! The best part is that you don't have to worry about meat damage.

Zachary
 

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I picked the Nosler Ballistic Tips because they have a proven reputation for deer and antelope. Ballistic coefficient is good for long shots and wind resistance. I looked at Hornady SSTs, but didn't buy them. I think they might be just as good, and I believe they're less expensive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have been taking a few neck shots here lately with my 264 mag. Don't really have the confidence with the 270 though. I could do it just choose not to. The 264 with 120gr. ballistic tips is devastating in the neck. The last one I shot the head was only held on by skin, there was nothing left. Needless to say I am going to be taking more neck shots on the does at least.
 

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I have shot a few deer with the 270 and the 130gr. ballistic tip and have yet to have a problem with bullet performance.
BruceP
 

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264.

Sounds like that .270 needs some work. Like any rifle it may need some adjustment, in the bedding, sights, or load, copper build-up. I have one that will not shot Power Pts(factory). In another .270 it will shoot Power Pts. out of the same box in a small group. Do tell! If it does not do the job for you, sell it.

Had a 7 Mag. that would not shoot exceptable groups with Rem, Fed, or Win. factory ammo. Not a happy day with a new rifle. I noted that all the factory rounds appeared to have powder charges that did not fill the case. I then selected a Remington bullet, H4831, and loads that more closely filled the case. Suddenly I had a rifle that I was happy with. I have seen Remington factory 7 Mag. do an outstanding job in a friend's rifle.

As for neck shots, most rounds from the .300 Sav. up will cause lots of damage and a large hole. I was amazed what a 150 grain Remington Bronze Pt. from a .300 Savage did to a deers neck. That is the nature of softpoint bullets when they hit the spine(hard object.)

Practice is a key element.


Siskiyou
 

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For what it's worth a 270 was the first rifle i got. I got it for my 16th birthday and trust me that was more than a couple years ago. I shot my first deer with it and couldn't believe it ran off. I've learned dropping one in it's tracks is not normal. For a while I used a 7MM weatherby Mag and even with a good broadside shot at less than 100 yards he still ran. About the only thing I've dropped a deer with are my 35 Rem using 200 plus grain softnose (brush gun) and a 12 Ga slug with a neck shot. I have found the 150 grain nossler part. do a great job in the 270 and there is less chance for deflection fron grass twigs etc. After over 35 years I still like the way my 270 works. (Course I just ordered a 7MM mag in a TC Encore so I'll have to see how that works)
 
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