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Tough to do these days, but I still get excited about buying something with the American flag on the box, or just a simple "Made in U.S.A."
Just a thought.
 

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i do that myself as much as possible, but it
gets tougher and more tough every day :'( :'( :'(
(these ^ tears should be bigger)
 

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these days you'll have to go to Canada or Mexico if you want to buy anything "made in America".
 

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In a real way, I'm glad that folks in other countries can buy Made in the USA. It means we're making something again, and were making more of it that we can use ourselves, so we can sell it and bring some $ back home. It means were making something that other folks are happy to buy, feel like its quality, and has value. So much of our economy exists in the ether that one wonders what we'd have left if the electrons stopped moving along the inter webs.


I buy American when it makes sense, but I'm conscious that all too often my buying American is contributing to a death cycle which feeds greedy corporate banksters, and leaves the poor worker (and their union bosses) out in the cold ... at least that's the way it seems.


I definitely buy local as often as I can, although to hear it put, my purchasing local is contributing to the employment of a lot of illegal immigrants ... since the local kids would turn their nose up at picking fruits and vegetables, and instead spend their time protesting for a higher minimum wage and student loan forgiveness.


Seems like there's just no winning if you chase the thread further than the point of sale, so I keep myself warm at night knowing that a few hard working americans had a job somewhere, probably selling a new bass boat to the union boss, or sweeping up the litter left in the wake of the protesters.
 

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When you buy a foreign product with a American name like Stanely, Porter Cable, Dewalt, Ridged, Winchester and many more in the hardware shooting sports and out doors you are Making A lot of money for an American company with cheap foreign labor.

Many people today, My kids included buy about every thing on line. When they do that they always search these sites first. Even in the grocery store the daughter looks at the label on produce and other produces to see where they were grown or raised. No Foreign produce for her.

http://www.stillmadeinusa.com/

http://www.madeinamericastore.com/

http://americansworking.com/

http://madeintheusa.com/

:) Al
 

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Why do you think that the point of manufacture matters? Most of the money in a product is in design, development, distribution, marketing, and sales: America makes a lot of money that way even on products made by foreign companies. Don't those jobs count for anything? Then there are enabling products, like TVs and computers, which are conduits for the sale of products, entertainments, and services. In other words, you buy a $500 computer and end up spending $10,000 in online purchases during its five year life span. Doesn't that matter?
 

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Some stuff is made in America, and using American workers. But the company is still foreign, most of these plants are only assembly plants and the parts are made elsewhere. I know that's the case with Toyota and Honda. Caterpillar still has a big foundry and they actually cast heavy structures for Volvo and Mitsubishi as well as their own. And they used to do a lot of the machining on those parts, but I'm not sure if they still do.


John Deer and Hitachi as far as heavy equipment are about the same two tractors some parts will interchange.
But I'm not sure if the manufacture of these parts is still 50/50 like it once was.

A lot of the equipment used in the oil field is still American made, the pumps, draw works, derricks.
Wire line, Hopper pulling units, National oil well, there was some foreign stuff showing up but it was basicly junk and company's stopped buying it.
 

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Have a little pride: The US is the world's #1 manufacturing country. China is a near second. Japan and Germany are very distant third and fourth. About foreign companies manufacturing here, it makes sense to build a lot of things close to where they're used; it's a lot cheaper that way.
 

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Conan said:
The US is the world's #1 manufacturing country. China is a near second.

China passed us in 2010, and left us in the dust in 2013. They are 23.2% of the manufacturing economy, and we are only 17.2%, and they are still climbing as their per capita manufacturing is still low, while we continue to fall back as ours is still high. Japan is 7.8%, Germany 6.3% for reference.


... according to MAPI, the Manufacturers Alliance for Productivity and Innovation:
https://www.mapi.net/china-solidifies-position-worlds-largest-manufacturer
 

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mechanic said:
Caterpillar just announced layoffs of 10,000.

That's mostly from their Power Systems Division, it relies heavily on oil field exploration and production.
CAT did this in the 1980s during that crash, I barely escaped that lay off.
ONAN/Cummins are kicking CATs tail in standby power, CAT was getting to where they were priceing themselves
out of the market. Industrial Engine sales are way down, oil field was 70% of that market including the gas conversion engines used in production. CAT is so big that when they say 10,000 lay offs that doesn't mean just
American jobs. It includes plants in Mexico, Brazil, Europe, Asia, including white collar workers as well.
And cutting a lot of TEPS factory dealers, only temporally set up to take up some of the overload during a boom.


They know they are temporary, and many of these plants will just return to what they were doing before CAT came in making them a retainer deal they couldn't refuse. It won't effect the service/dealer end of it all, there is just to much equipment out there still running on other projects world wide. A lay off like I experienced doesn't mean that a dealer isn't going to snatch you up, your to skilled to be out there kicking rocks.
Or Cummins is sure going to come after you.
 

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Team Nelson,

Good catch! I forgot about that. Now a country with four times the population of the US is manufacturing more than the US. Still pretty hard to say that US is not a manufacturing power house. Another thing about US manufacturing is the US reputation for high quality manufactured goods; that's a word-wide reputation, and it makes US products very desirable.
 

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Conan said:
Team Nelson,

Good catch! I forgot about that. Now a country with four times the population of the US is manufacturing more than the US. Still pretty hard to say that US is not a manufacturing power house. Another thing about US manufacturing is the US reputation for high quality manufactured goods; that's a word-wide reputation, and it makes US products very desirable.
I need to find the report, but there was an (unpopular) study that revealed right to work shops produced on average a higher quality than union shops, and those plants who operate in right to work states have lower incident rates which affect workmanship and oversight. We have a good number of skilled labor in America today, who can do great work and have great lives if the government (and others) would just get out of the way. But what we don't have is a culture that cherishes skilled laborers, that tells their children that its honorable take the tech-track in high school, and get a trade instead of $75K in student debt and a job at Starbucks. Other cultures have recognized that the strength of their economy is not in academia, but in training craftsmen. China figured it out, and all they need to do is keep working on increasing their per capita manufacturing through training and technolgy, and the will out manufacture the rest of the world combined. Their only limit is resources.
 

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Sheridan5mm said:
Tough to do these days, but I still get excited about buying something with the American flag on the box, or just a simple "Made in U.S.A."
Just a thought.

I prefer to buy based on quality/cost. If made in the U.S., good; but if the American option is junk, I have no problem buying foreign-made.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I bought some light bulbs for my American truck that was made in Mexico today. Not sure where the bulbs were made, but I didn't have much of a choice. The only brand they carried was Sylvania.

Also got some of those little plastic anchor thingies to re-attach the mud flaps and some of those clamshell wire connectors so I could jerry-rig the wiring for one of the headlights and avoid buying a $900 module that I believe is rigged itself to fail, as the headlights are not wired through the fusebox. If I has to guess, I'd say the little plastic parts made a long boat ride to get here.
Probably shoulda used nuts, bolts, and washers on the mudflap. But I'm not sure all the holes are accessible from the backside.
 

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Conan said:
Why do you think that the point of manufacture matters?

It matters because manufacturing is one of only three ways to produce volumes of new wealth (agriculture and natural resources being the other two). Most everything else is just moving existing money around.

Also, manufacture things overseas and by necessity, most of the supply chain and support function jobs required to operate a factory (construction, maintenance, purchasing, quality assurance, engineering, truck drivers, tire shops that puts tires on the trucks, etc.) go to people in that country's economy. It's not just the US factory worker that loses his job when a company outsources.

It really matters to me personally; I've made my living in manufacturing for 30+ years.
 

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There is one universal truth about manufacturing today and it doesn't matter where it's made, who makes it, or who is making the profit from it. That truth is that EVERYTHING is made for a short working life and designed to need replacing quickly in order to maximize profits. The younger generations have grown up to accept, and prefer, a disposable existence and I don't think that excludes people. They think nothing of having to buy a new computer or refrigerator or automobile every two or three years. My mother-in-law has a freezer made more than 50 years ago that is still operating perfectly, if not the most energy-efficiently. Do you think ANY appliance made today will still be operational in 2065? The yuppies of today love to rant and protest and pontificate about others' lifestyles being bad for the environment but hypocritically ignore the impact of their own landfill filling lifestyle.
 
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