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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Well, I tried the Armour corned beef hash this morning and I botched it. I tried to make two patties fried crisp on both sides using butter as the fat. Temp was 4 on a scale of 1 to 10 on electric stove. That's hot enough to sizzle, but not hot enough to burn stuff to a smoldering crisp quickly.

The patties fell apart. I did get them crisp, but the overall effect was not good.

There seems to be two confounding factors: the moisture in the taters needs quite a bit of cooking to evaporate, and the meat is chopped so fine that just doesn't stay formed as a patty.

I could rethink the process by, say, putting the hash in a baking dish, baking it long enough to dry it some, and then broil it to get a crispy top. That might work.

Got any suggestions for doin' it up right?

I'm thinking "what would jethro of the Beverly hillbillies do"? The jethro inspiration is to forsake the hog jowls and possum shanks for a moment and fry up some potatoes and onions so they are nice and browned. Separately, cook a hamburger patty. Then fry two eggs over easy. Top the potatoes with one egg and the burger with the other.
 

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Are you seriously against beating an egg and adding the corned beef to bind it before frying? Kind of an omelet?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Are you seriously against beating an egg and adding the corned beef to bind it before frying? Kind of an omelet?
Will that work? It will bind it, but I'd probably be sacrificing crispiness. Is that the state of practice with current theory? There does seem to be a trade off in binding versus crispitude.
 

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"I could rethink the process by, say, putting the hash in a baking dish, baking it long enough to dry it some, and then broil it to get a crispy top. That might work."
You will not like the results

UNLESS, you want your hash to be very loose, as I prefer, you add NOTHING to it.
It takes a goodly, I repeat, goodly, amount of time for even the driest canned hash to cook off moisture it is canned with.
Even in a very hot pan , it will take longer than you expect.
AT the same time, it can go from , **** this is taking a long time -- to -- OH shite, I should have watched it closer -- suddenly , depending on brand.

When I add eggs to my hash I always cook them separately ,even if they are in the same pan, and then combine them; some times I will cook them separately, totally, two pans, and just set the fried eggs on top off the hash.
If you add raw scrambled eggs to it, STILL, cook it for a goodly amount of time before adding the eggs as you have to cook the moisture out of hash to a level YOU like.
You will probably NEVER get a burger type patty but you can get it tight and dry so it does not fall out of the bun like a loose meat sandwich.
I have been eating hash for as long as I have eaten something beyond baby food, or about as long as I have been drinking coffee.
 

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I just fry the corned beef hash in the frying pan. I still it not as a patty, until brown. Then put it on my plate. Fry 3 eggs and put them on top and eat it all together.

Jees you guys make everything so complicated. How hard is it to fry something?
 

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my favorite way to eat it is to fry it with a couple scrambled eggs and a bit of cheese and put that on biscuits and ladle on some sausage gravy. Was shown it that way in the service down in VA years ago and its still my favorite
 

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Sounds dandy, some of us enjoy the process of creation in the kitchen, for some it is fuel for the furnace, for many it varies.
Heard a guy write once that his taste buds were so sensitive he could be food editor for Guns and Ammo Magazine.
best wishes
 

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Wow Lloyd, that sounds like the breakfast recipe of the year! All my favorites - eggs, cheese, hash, biscuits and gravy, rolled into one! Have to try that sometime.

Conan: Hash was never meant to be a pattie! If you want a pattie use sausage!!! Next thing you know you'll be trying to make a bacon puree!
 

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Conan, to achieve your goal I believe canned hash won’t work. The potatoes are chosen for their ability to do exactly what they did.

Going to have to hand forge your dream from raw ingredients I’m afraid. There are no shortcuts to personal perfection. Cheap and easy to live someone else’s dream though.

Bob is onto something though about time, it takes forever. Try this, it won’t be a patty as such but...
Put it in the skillet at medium, arrange it in that patty and don’t touch it. I’m talking 10 minutes likely more, then slide her out. The bottom might just have glued itself together.

I need a kinder gentler machine gun
 

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I just fry the corned beef hash in the frying pan. I still it not as a patty, until brown. Then put it on my plate. Fry 3 eggs and put them on top and eat it all together.

Jees you guys make everything so complicated. How hard is it to fry something?
What Byron said!

It does seem to me that in years past you could cut both ends of a can and push out patties, cutting them about an inch thick. Can't seem to do that nowadays as they fall apart after the heat hits them. So I have modified my method. Simply mash the whole can into an 8 inch skillet, fry one side until brown and crisp, turn once and fry until that side is crisp.

Then it's onto a plate with a couple a three over easy eggs on top. Mash the whole mess together and enjoy! :tango_face_grin:

My mouf's waterin'... I think I'll go make some now! :p
 

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Chicken fruit! Hope you find the eggs, I think I have a can and will "glue it together" on medium with a bagel like hole in the center, after the flip, the eggs will go in, heat off, lid it and check if for perfection.
Real butter on the toast!

Some like the forum for cooking science, some like it for the flavor and dining experiences, most a little of each at the time and season of life.
blessings:tango_face_wink:
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Round two, and a satisfactory approach. I had enough left for a good helping of hash this morning, and I'm pleased with the result. The idea of a firm patty probably is too quixotic from canned hash, but it doesn't have to be difficult or time consuming, and it doesn't have to have the consistency of lumpy gravy, like I'd get if I just heated it up. Here's what I did...

Put the hash into a saucepan with a lid over medium low heat, just enough to heat it and get the moisture evaporating. I put the lid on the saucepan so that he interior would heat faster and start steaming. This did the trick for releasing a lot of the moisture. Then I put the hash into my non stick egg skillet in one nice lump, along with some butter. Got it sizzling at medium low and let it cook like that for about five minutes, until the hash stopped releasing steam. That crisped and browned one side.

I then released the hash from the skillet in omelet fashion so that it was crispy side up on the plate. Two fried eggs on top, and voila! It was a decent hash texture. Not a patty. But forkable and not all mushy and wet.

The main thing driving my thinking was that canned hash is inherently supposed to be a convenience food. The preparation had to be convenient. This whole preparation took about fifteen minutes, a very acceptable time to me. And above all easy.

Thanks Bob for turning me on to this third way that forms an eternal golden braid: bacon, sausage, and now hash.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I
Wow Lloyd, that sounds like the breakfast recipe of the year! All my favorites - eggs, cheese, hash, biscuits and gravy, rolled into one! Have to try that sometime.

Conan: Hash was never meant to be a pattie! If you want a pattie use sausage!!! Next thing you know you'll be trying to make a bacon puree!
Hey spruce, i had no idea that you're the antichrist. Bacon purée? You need to stop having such impure thoughts.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
If served with crisp hash browns, the hash would not need to be fried to any crispness. the hash browns would provide crispness. It looks like just getting rid of excess moisture is sufficient. So, a small serving of hash browns plus a small serving of hash plus two eggs make the meal. And there's crispiness.

Alternatively, skip the hash browns, and have hash with eggs on top, and served with toast.

It makes me wonder where the idea that hash needs to be crisp came from. My experiments show that it's not a desirable goal to have it crispy because hash doesn't lend itself to crisping.
 
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