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Anyone use the chef's choice sharpeners? I am looking at one that puts a "trizor" edge on the knife. What I need to know is how will this work for a filet knife and hunting knifes. I use stones and can put a razor edge on most knives but it takes me hours and hours to do so.
 

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Never tried one, mainly 'cause when I looked at that hollow ground "trizor" edge I just sort of shook my head in disbelief. While that sort of edge probably works well for slicing thin stuff that doesn't exceed the thickness of the edge, using it to slice deeply into something(like butchering a deer or cutting any meat or trying ta whittle/chop a hunk of wood etc), defies the whole principle of edge/blade geometry; which in turn defines how well(easily) a blade will cut. Hollow ground by definition is a segment of a circle.
In the case of the trizor edge, what you have is one end(which will be thicker than the rest of the circle) being sharpened,and a thinner, weaker arc(the rest of the circle) that joins the main part of the blade at a fairly abrupt angle. When you cut with such an edge, what happens is the material you're cutting, lets say meat, after being parted by the sharp(thicker) segment of the edge, sort of ignores the rest of the arc and then jams into that abrupt angle. What you get at point is a point of resistance. Because of reistance point, the material being cut will be forced away from that point at anywhere from 45-90 degrees. In knife parlance that's known as wedging. The material no longer "flows" smoothly from the edge and then along the blade, but is being forced away from the blade. Same thing happens when trying to cut deeply with a knife with a hollow ground or sabre ground blade. Any time there's a point of resistance(friction), the blade acts as a hinderance rather than an aid to further cutting. Not that you can't cut with them, but they're not efficient. In the case of the trizor being a stronger edge, that's pure BS. No segment of a circle is stronger, in this particular case, than a straight or convex edge. The forces being applied are moving in the wrong direction. Even a straight edge bevel that you see on most factory knives nowadays aren't particularly efficient(but they are more so than a hollow ground edge), because you get that same wedging effect where that abrupt angle occurs as the edge meets the blade thickness. The best edge is slightly convex, where the transistion between the edge and the blade is a smooth, relatively frictionless, arc. It's the edge I put on my knives, and I've yet to have a customer complain. If you want a great,longlasting edge and are tired of doing it by hand, there are two better options. If you have a bench grinder, then the sharpening wheels sold in any knifemakers supply catalog(Texas Knifemakers Supply, Jantz, K&G, Sheffield etc) cost about 15-18 dollars and will put a superb edge any any blade with a little practice(that's what kitchen knives are for). A second option is a small 1" x 30" belt grinder(which is what I use). Most of them also have a small 5" disk grinder attached also. For around 60-75 dollars you end up with much more versitile tool that'll sharpen(actually resharpen) a blade in about 30 seconds flat. All you'd need are some 600 grit belts(Knifemakers supply catalogs again). Even one will do a lot of knives. When you use a beltgrinder, you use the slack part of the belt above the platen to sharpen with. End up with a visible wire edge that can be removed with a soft buffing wheel or a leather strop, or a piece of damp cardboard etc. Again takes a little practice(kitchen knives again) but when you compare a couple of minutes total with either the wheels or the belt, compared to hours with your stones, might be worth the cost. I know once you cut with one it will be worth it. All this verbosity is, of course, IMHO.
 

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