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Discussion Starter #1
I came home the other evening and the wife came slipping around the garage with a .38 in her hand. Thank God that I have a clean conscience or I might have been doing some emergency laundry. She had run a varmint up a tree and was going to blast it out. I had my .22 Magnum Ruger 77-22 in the car and cleaned the varmint's clock, spoiling my wife's fun.

I got to thinking about the posts that I have read about hunting hogs with .22 Magnum, and wondering what loads are popular for this pursuit. I have loads from 30 to 50 grains and I would guess that the Federal 50 grain bullets might do the best job. I know that a lot of people consider the use of anything under .50 BMG to be tempting fate, but it's a slow summer, and a good time for sitting on the porch and thinking.
 

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hello

yeah that subject has turned up a ton of debates so ill put my 2 cents in as well, to be honest ive been one of the doubters myself until over the loast 2 years ive seen quite a few hogs taken with either a 22 or 22mag i just came back from a ranch where the main guide uses a reminton nylon 22 but he will only shoot them when he has a head on shot and right between the eyes being said when on the Tolar ranch i seen them take a few hogs with a 22 mag lever action they used 40 solids.
personally not my choice but im not going to knock anyone for using that as if it was my only weapon i wouldnt let it keep me from hunting my favorite animal on earth. just pick your shots wisely and be careful
 

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Oldtimer,

Wow, as I read your story I decided the wild hog varmint climbed the tree and you harvested him just before your wife did. Around here, most of our hogs are ground shot!

Just woofin' you. Can't comment on the .22 mag but I did take a good sized hog with a .40 cal. S&W Sigma pistol a couple of years ago when we had a chance encounter. He was on the ground though.

Smiling with you,

Mike

PS. Check the hog anatomy photos on the http://www.texasboars.com/anatomy.html web site where they dissect a hog to show organ placement. It will change where you shoot hogs due to the location of the vitals and spine.
 

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I would never hunt hogs with a .22 mag, but if all I had was a .22 mag I would kill smaller pigs by getting close and aiming just under the ear with solids. I prefer a .222 or .243 for my pig population control.

pepaw
 

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:grin: Back in the late 40s, early 50s the only guns in the house were an old single barrel Winchester 12 gauge and a Winchester pump .22 rifle. Ammo for the .22 was cheap so it got more use than the old 12 did. During this period I seen many hogs and several deer taken with the .22, sometimes single loading the rifle with .22 shorts, but shooting .22 LR when we could afford them since they would feed. The key to taking hogs/deer was a shot between the eyes from as close as you could get.

Today I wouldn't recommend the .22 for shooting hogs, but in the hands of a skilled hunter and marksman it will do the trick.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
If given a choice, I would never try a hog with a .22 Magnum, but I recall in some areas that is all the law will allow. We used to kill hogs with a .22 by shooting them in the head. I miss the old time hog killings when the whole community would get together to kill hogs after the weather turned cold.
My wife has the account book from her great-grandfather's country store. It dates from 1913 to 1917. There are lots of listings every November when someone would come in and buy five or six .22 cartridges. I would be willing to bet that was how many hogs the family had to kill.
The varmint that my wife treed was not a hog, but one that liked the taste of the catfood in the garage. Since we have rabies in the area, and since it did not show her the proper respect by hightailing out of the garage, its fate was sealed. My wife is a woman to be reckoned with, ever since she outshot a revenuer with his own gun. In my part of the world, there is not a lot higher praise for anyone, man or woman.
 

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i liked the reserch

that was interesting about the old store and just buying 5 or 6 cartridges, i guess i take things for granted as it is not uncommon to just waste a brick of 500 in a day
 

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After looking at the anatomy photos I'm guessing a head or neck shot is best, unless you want to destroy a shoulder or both with a good .30 caliber penetrating slug. Is this correct? It would seem a .223 or similiar low recoil caliber would be nice for placing a shot where you need it. Might be the excuse I need to buy another rifle..... for hog head shots.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The small caliber shooters all talk about hitting the head. I know it is easy in a pen, usually, but a wholey different matter in the field. Elmer Keith wrote in his book, Sixguns, of a Civil War officer who shot a running hog with a .36 caliber revolver and dropped it. I guess in addition to an excuse for another rifle, you could use that as an excuse for a sidearm in the .36 caliber range. I could think of a few candidates that would make my list.
 

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At close range while still-hunting, it isn't that big of a trick with a good scope. When the pigs area eating corn, that's also not too difficult from a blind with a rest. "0" waste of meat and instantaneous death.

pepaw
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The posts that I have seen from people who use the smaller caliber guns indicate that they go for head shots. From my experiences with the .223, I would be willing to use it for head shots, as it is quite accurate. That is, of course, if you don't like brains. My grandmother used to make us shoot squirrels in the body, so she could have the brains with egggs. Needless to say, she expected a mess of squirrels, because like some folks we all know, one just did not have enough brains to go around.
 

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I have shot quite a few in the head and neck with a .223 (T/C super 14). you just can't rush or force the shot- if it's not there you can't make it happen.
 

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I have killed quite a few hogs with a 22 and a buddy of only uses a 17. Just shoot them in the ear or just behind it and they will drop like a stone. Only movement will be a few seconds of twitching.
Kevin
 

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Just as a question what might make the best hog round out of a 22 Magnum? I have one and sometimes use it for varmint hunting, It shoots very well with CCI 40 grain solid and hollow point bullets.
 

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yeah right :-D people say a slingshot can't do the, but a 22 HA,HA,HA! :twisted:
 

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I was just taking a break from writing a Bible study and saw the comment about slingshots. I guess you mean the rubber tube type, because David sure did not have much trouble dropping Goliath with one (1 Samuel 17:49). He did it in one shot, though he had taken five rocks with him. I would think it would be a really sporting way to go hog hunting. :eek: . If you try it, post a picture.
 

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Got to admit to killing a LOT of hogs with the .22 LR from my Ruger K77/22RP. With 4X Weaver scope and a steady tree stand rest, distance within 25 yards, front of the head shots in the "X" between the ears and eyes, the report of the .22LR startles the hogs in a sounder, but they usually do not disburse. They will soon commence eating around their dead buddy and I then shoot another one, and so it goes until I have enough to BBQ or run out of hogs. My Ruger digests the cheapest Federal 36 grain hollow points and spits them into dime sized holes at 50 yards from a steady rest. The 22 caliber is a killing gun on hogs under the conditions described above.

For the record: the 1953-65 World Record Grizzly Bear was taken with a single shot 22 LR, not that I would go bear hunting with that. Here's the full story and photo of the hunter and bear hide:

“Grizzly Guns” by H. V. Stent

If you are planning a grizzly hunt or only dreaming of one, a big question is which rifle to use.

On that fascinating subject, I’ve been amassing information for some 40 years of living as a teacher, fruit grower and hunter in that bear paradise, British Columbia, where stories of encounters with grizzlies and brown bears are enjoyed where ever sportsmen gather and are often headlined in newspapers and television newscasts.

Such meetings sometimes result in a mauled man or shot bear, or both. A recent one ended with both man and bear dead.

Rolf Voss of Surrey, British Columbia, had shot a caribou near Fort Nelson, in the north-central part of the province, and was carrying parts of the carcass back to his camp in wooded mountain country when a grizzly, perhaps smelling the meat, attacked him. Voss got off two shots with his .270 that proved fatal to the bear, but the grizzly bit Voss about the head – they usually go for the head – and killed him. The two bodies were found side by side.

This is no reflection on the .270. That cartridge has killed many grizzlies and browns. In 1985, a fine 27-incher (total skull measurement) fell to a .270 in the hands of Roger Pentecost of Peachland, BC. In 1986, another record-class grizzly was killed by Alvars Barkis of Sinking Spring, Pennsylvania, with a .300 Magnum; and a medium-size one, about 500 pounds, was killed by 12-year-old Gary H. Holmes of Kimberly, BC, with a .25/06. Back in 1965, the world-record grizzly fell to one .30/30 bullet fired by Jack Turner. And before that, the world-record grizzly succumbed to a .22 Rimfire!

Bella Twin, an Indian girl, and her friend Dave Auger were hunting grouse near Lesser Slave Lake in northern Alberta. The only gun they had was Bella’s single-shot bolt-action .22 Rimfire rifle. They were walking a cutline that had been made for oil exploration when they saw a large grizzly following the same survey line toward them. If they ran, the bear would probably notice them and might chase, so they quietly sat down on a brush pile and hoped that the bear would pass by without trouble. But the bear came much too close, and when the big boar was only a few yards away, Bella Twin shot him in the side of the head with a .22 Long cartridge. The bear dropped, kicked and then lay still. Taking no chances, Bella went up close and fired all of the cartridges she had, seven or eight .22 Longs, into the bear’s head. That bear, killed in 1953, was the world-record grizzly for several years and is still high in the records today. Which only goes to show that in an emergency, strange things are possible, but who wants that kind of emergency?


 

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Got to know just what do you consider a Wild Hog(size/weight)? Our family Veterinarian was chased up a stunted White Oak by a 275 plus pound Razorback that he had wounded with his Win. 88 .308. The rifle jammed when he tried to chamber the second shot, leaving him with a expensive club. Dropped the rifle and up the tree he went. He always carried a .22 WMR revolver and a box of 40 gr. Winchester solids. He shot that old boar over 20 times in the head before it went off to lay under some brush nearby. I laid there and died of the original wound from the .308. If you going to shoot “Piglets” then I guess a .22 WMR would do but if you’re after bigger “hogs” then get a bigger caliber. Lawdog
:D
 

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60#'s to 200#'rs and 3 to 11 in number are typical in flood plain / pine upland forest sounders. Big boars walk alone. I have never been confronted with a really BIG boar hog while tree sitting with the 22LR. I would not want to EAT one that large, although I have eaten them well over 300# live weight. I think I would not shoot a BIG boar with a 22LR. The results would be speculative. Big boars need big bores. So far, every one as described above and shot in the "X" with the 22LR has dropped in its tracks. That's 20+ and counting.

What do you call a piglet? Suckling pigs and wet sows are not shot. Pigs are fed, hogs are eaten.

Farmer Jones got out of his car and while heading for his friend’s door, noticed a pig with a wooden leg. His curiosity roused, he asks, "Fred, how’d that pig get him a wooden leg?"

"Well Michael, that’s a mighty special pig! A while back a wild boar attacked me while I was walking in the woods. That pig there came a runnin’, went after that boar and chased him away. Saved my life!"

"And the boar tore up his leg?"

"No he was fine after that. But a bit later we had that fire. Started in the shed up against the barn. Well, that ole pig started squealin’ like he was stuck, woke us up, and ‘fore we got out here, the darn thing had herded the other animals out of the barn and saved ‘em all!"

"So that’s when he hurt his leg, huh, Fred?"

"No, Michael. He was a might winded, though. When my tractor hit a rock and rolled down the hill into the pond I was knocked clean out. When I came to, that pig had dove into the pond and dragged me out ‘fore I drownded. Sure did save my life."

"And that was when he hurt his leg?"

"Oh no, he was fine. Cleaned him up, too."

"OK, Fred. So just tell me. How did he get the wooden leg?"

"Well", the farmer tells him, "A pig like that, you jest don’t want to eat all at once."
 
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