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Finally a documented kill

Every one says they do not attack humans . Now to send a group of wackos hiking in the same area ....
Opps thats a bit harsh , but there is a group of people that need a wake up call .
Sorry to hear of young ladies demise.
 

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I wonder why this hybrid happened, and if it were natural or a man induced cross breeding. Here in Minnesota we have thousands of wolves living in the same area that coyotes live in amd have never heard of a cross. Would be an interesting creature though.
 

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A wolf will normally kill a coyote on sight, they will not tolorate them in their territory. yellowstone was over run by yotes til the reintroduced the wolf now they are rarely seen.
 

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I'm wondering where in the North Eastern United states there are wolves?

Just as a coyote won't tolerate a fox within its territory, they learn to adapt to the environment.

I still wonder if these "hybrids" aren't man induced. If not it must be a wolf population that is so low that there are limited mating opportunities.
 

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Wolfs normally kill every coyote they see they will not tolerate them in their area, yellowstone has very few yotes since the wolf was reintroduced.
 

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I can't see how they can claim that picture in the first link is a yote wold hybrid. Looks like any coyote we shoot around here in MN. As for wolves and coyotes not being in te same area, BS there are tons of both in Northern MN. Just that the coyotes there have lived amongst wolves for many generations and know how to avoid the wolves. Wolves won't tolerate a dog in thier territory either, but despite alot of peoples dogs being killed by wolves there are still dogs there.
 

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billy_56081 said:
I'm wondering where in the North Eastern United states there are wolves?

Just as a coyote won't tolerate a fox within its territory, they learn to adapt to the environment.

I still wonder if these "hybrids" aren't man induced. If not it must be a wolf population that is so low that there are limited mating opportunities.
normally a cat will attack a rabbit as in this video but you need to watch this

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LAn2UFXSsgw


i had a perverted boxer dog that once raped a pig
there were no offspring

so the can be some inter-breeding
 

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Montanan: this is nothing new to us neu yawkers who shoot these critters. My neighbors and I have all taken big heavy coyotes (65 lb) some others have mistaken for wolves, but we also have the Canadian Grey Wolf coming back into nys. And they interbreed with the eastern Coyote which produces a larger Coyote.

I think the Grey Wolf and the Eastern Coyote have interbred for better than 100 years with the result being bigger, heavier local Coyotes. 20 years ago the typical Coyote diet was 80% small game and 20% Whitetail but that has reversed due to both the Coyote and Whitetail population expansions and I have no doubt the Canadian Wolf has come farther south to take advantage of both the larger Whitetail population but also the smaller Coyote.

The Eastern Coyote wasn't really any bigger than their western cousins until the Canadian Wolves began cross-breeding with the Eastern Coyote and sometimes it is difficult to tell if you are looking at a Coyote or a Wolf. We have had Wolves taken as far south as our Adirondack Park, which is about 200 miles south of the Canadian border.

Our Chief Wildlife Pathologist sez that each breed contains dna of the other and it is difficult to tell - no it ain't - Wolves are big and nasty - they have skulls and jaws that can and will take a human apart. Coyotes are smaller and their skulls are of different shape but I have no desire to get in the way of those razor sharp pointed teeth and I firmly believe that Coyotes are often responsible for the total disappearance of 'remains' (such as when a victim has been left in the woods andthere isn't any thing left after only one year). And Coyotes have packed up on hunters here, following doe scent on hunters boots and going nuts and packing up and even trying to get up ladder stands.

I have no doubt that Coyotes attacked that hiker. If she paniced (sp?) and tried to run they would probably have gone after her. If they were in a pack frenzy and she was menstrating and they smelled blood and she tried to run, she was done for. jmtcw.
 

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Mikey I fully agree, as I have in years past seen those coyote pictures that hunters have shot. This artical was no more than some expert ::) trying to ring the alarm bell in the west as if it were something new that was just found.

All the while the hunters like yourselves are looking at each other saying, "Ah yep, only proves what we've known all along"

Here in this picture of me taken quite a few years ago, I'm holding up this coyote of the average Montana size here in the NW.

 

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I think the Grey Wolf and the Eastern Coyote have interbred for better than 100 years with the result being bigger, heavier local Coyotes. 20 years ago the typical Coyote diet was 80% small game and 20% Whitetail but that has reversed
My thoughts exactly. A good report by a biologist that I had read several years ago suggest some cross breeding between the Coyote and the Red Wolf at the turn of the century. You would think that the blood line would have thinned down but I see many Coyotes around here with a lot of red colorization. These can be bigger animals (upwards 60 pounds) with shorter ears and brooder snout hence, the eastern Coyote.

Another variety suggested is the breed between Coyotes and wild dogs. It is not so much the domestic dog but rather the dogs that were around when the Indians were. These make for a smaller, meaner animal that are hard on the trap lines as they will tear up most any trapped species in sight. I recon that a large eastern would do this also but they seem to be a warier animal and harder to call. If I want a large eastern, I am willing to call & coax for upwards of 45min to an hour. The important thing to remember is to give that yote a way to get to you without exposing it'self too much.

The third type is Coyote\Domestic breed. Offspring can favor the Coyote but the give away is that they are mostly black. The Black Coyote used to be worth $50 but then it was found that the hair would slip bladly on a processed hide so now they will pay nothing for them.

The gray wolf is around here in central Il but they are elusive. A Pike county hunter took a gray in the winter of 95' that was five foot long and weighed 90lbs. This was legal but the DNR posted a "Dont Shoot A Wolf Under Penalty" page in the 2006 regulations. The Wolfs are coming in more & more as they are already established in Iowa & Wisconson which border IL on the North & N\W...they were projected to infiltrate the U.S. Borders north to south but are running behind on the projected date by a couple years.

Meanwhile, it becomes more & more common to see the Red Fox in town early and late in the day.
 

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glance: that other variety you mentioned is what we refer to as the Coy Dog, wild, smaller than the coyote but a wild dog. We have/had them here in up-a-state ny but they may have been driven out or eliminated by the coyote or wolf. Some of our locals (who may be democraps lacking descriptions) call the domestic/coyote mix coy dogs but, they are democraps and don't know what they're talkin' 'bout.....

The mix of coyote and domestic dog, whether feral or not, is plainly seen here, and often. My hunting buddy got one this past Sat. am. It was black and grey and about 45 lbs and my buddy described his 'presenting' as definately agressive, so he shot'm.............end of story.....
 

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I suspect that this maybe rare, or maybe not rare mixing has been going on for several thousand years. Here in certain parts of Texas we have Whitetails in the brush, and Mulies in the hills and canyons. But we also have their mixing, that some here call "Blacktails" which is the mixing of the two.
As for as our K-9 friends, we don't have any wolves here, but we have always had coyotes, and we have always had a mix with the occasional farm dog, for the infamous coydog.
Let a lone male run into a female in heat, and the mating will most likely begin. In this part of the country the coyotes in pairs or packs almost always kill, or try to kill (and eat) the domestic dog, but the young loner looking for a lover has many times in the past added a surprise now and then to the litter.
 

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billy_56081 said:
I wonder why this hybrid happened, and if it were natural or a man induced cross breeding. Here in Minnesota we have thousands of wolves living in the same area that coyotes live in amd have never heard of a cross. Would be an interesting creature though.
Man induced.
 

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ms said:
billy_56081 said:
I wonder why this hybrid happened, and if it were natural or a man induced cross breeding. Here in Minnesota we have thousands of wolves living in the same area that coyotes live in amd have never heard of a cross. Would be an interesting creature though.
Man induced.
Why? It sounds like a waste of time. Who would mix such a hybrid and for what purpose?

I have seen wolf/ dog hybrids kept as pets, but these days you need a permit for everything and anything. With the amount of trouble you have to go through to own certain terriers (the dreaded pitbull, which many insurance companies won't cover for homeowners) I can't see anybody paying anything for a coyote/dog much less a coyote/wolf. If no one will pay for one, there isn't much incemtive for anybody to purposefully cause it to happen.

I'm not saying that the hybridization isn't possable. I'm saying I can't see a reason for human involvement. If it ain't makin a buck, folks lose interest in a hurry. This is a natural phenomenon, or pure BS.
 

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Man raised captured wolves to reintroduce into the wild. They will probably crossbreed with coyotes because they haven't got the ancient tendency to kill the coyotes like their ancestors raised in the wild. When I was young, coyotes were not east of the Mississippi, neither was armadillos. Somehow with all the bridges across rivers now, they have crossed them at night and spread eastward. We had lots of foxes, oppossums, but no armadillos or coyotes. Coyotes here in the south will cross breed with wild dogs, making a very dangerous predator not afraid of humans. Always carry in the woods. Let the liberal and naives go in the woods without a weapon. Not me. We also have copperheads, rattlers, and cottomouths that might need dispatching. I never kill a king snake though, they kill rattlers. I also know of a guy who went turkey hunting one spring and was attacked by 5 wild dogs with a pit bull as the lead. He shot the pit bull and the others scattered. He said he came out of the woods shaking. I always shoot a wild dog with no collar. I have caught two dogs with collars and returned them to their owners, but if they have no collar, I assume they are wild.
 
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