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Hi all,

I am currently loading for the 9mm, and have a bullet seating question. When I put the bullet on a charged case, it ussually sits in the belled case very nicely, but sometimes it goes up into the seating die a little awkward. Does this affect accuracy, or does the die straighten it out?

thanks,
vanbuzen9
 

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For the most part, the die will straighten it out....to a point. I doubt that this is affecting accuracy at the ranges most pistols are used at. You can check bullet run out with a v block and a dial indicator.

For pistol shooting, while I'd try to get them straight, I don't think I'd worry about it much......now a rifle is a whole different thing..........
 

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Just guide it straight into the die with your fingers or buy a Lyman M-die to flair the mouths. Most dies with straighten them out while seating but then there's always the chance of a "crunch" one.
 

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seat the bullet in a standard seating die. It will be out of alignment, as are most semi auto rounds. Then in a seperate operation, get a taper crimp die. Run them through a taper crimp. All alignment problem will be solved. Never seat and crimp in the same operation. you are defying physics when you do so.
 

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vanbuzen9,

The die usually does straighten it out, but be sure not to seat the bullet too fast/hard. You need to give the case time to expand around the bullet. If you seat it too fast/hard the case could buckle, you could get a misaligned bullet, or both. I learned a little trick that helps prevent a crooked case while loading either rifle or pistol rounds. It does take a little more time, so do it only if you really want to.

Seat the bullet half-way; back the round out, and turn it approx. 180 degrees and seat the rest of the way. In my experience, I believe it does help ensure a straight and true round.

The tidbit about not seating and crimping in the same operation is also rock solid. I've ruined a few bullets that way; the case had cut into the jacket.

One more thing, I use a single stage press, so I don't really know if that tip I mentioned is applicable if used on a multiple stage press (A.K.A. "progressive reloader").

Hope this helps you out some.


:D
-Patriot
 

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Just my 2 cents worth , i load about 1000 to 1500 9mm a month and always seat and crimp in the same operation .

The key is not to over crimp , it does not take much crimp for the 9mm and for the range that it is shot at the accuracy is fine

AS for my hunting handgun and rifle i always crimp in a different step
 
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