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Discussion Starter #1
I have a prehistoric Weaver K4 that I robbed off of an Enfield Sporter and temporarily installed on my BC. While on the Enfield, the crosshairs were centered in the tube and the scope worked fine. I installed the K4 on the BC myself, maybe that's the problem?. I went out yesterday and sighted the BC in. It was off 2.5 feet low and about 1.5 feet to the right. Once I got it on the paper and sighted in it is very accurate. However the crosshairs are noticably off to the left. I can live with this for a month or so until the new scope is out of layaway.

Why is this happening? What is usually done to correct this problem?

Question number two. What is a good mid or low priced, quick & dirty boresighter. I want just enough to get it on the paper.

Thanks
ZM
 

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If you're bore sighting a rifle you can look through the barrel like with a bolt action with the bolt removed that is the quickest and least expensive way to do it. With the rifle on sandbags or other steady rest put up a target or use an object you can see through the barrel from the chamber end. Center the sight picture through the barrel on the target or object. (I use the padlock on my storage building) Next center the crosshairs on the same spot that is centered in your through the barrel sight picture. That's why it's called bore sighting BTW.
 

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To take the bore sighting a step farther, use an unprimed 45-70 case in your BC chamber, you may have to make the flash hole bigger to use it as a peep sight for looking through the bore. It's preferable to have the rifle in a vise of some sort to help immobilize it when making adjustment, but can be done without it if you're careful.

If you want a laser bore sighter, the Cabelas unit for $40 works real well.

As for the off center reticle, I'd center the reticle first using the mirror method recommended by Leupold. Since you already know there's a problem, I'd start by making sure the 3 mounting holes in the barrel are aligned with the bore using a long straight edge on the side of the base, it shouldn't show any runout towards the muzzle. It could also be caused by rings that aren't quite true. Remove one ring and reverse it 180º and see if that helps, if not, reverse the other ring to see if the reticle is closer aligned to the bore. As a last resort, and my first choice to begin with, get some Burris Signature Zee rings with the offset insert kit so you can literally zero the scope with the inserts without adjusting the scope.

Tim

The Leupold Answer Guide

Centering of a scope's adjustment dials

The elevation and windage adjustments of a scope are easily centered. Place a small mirror against the objective end of the scope. That would be the end farthest from your eye as you look through the scope. Make certain that the mirror is large enough to cover the entire objective. It must also be flat against the objective. With the scope's power selector ring set at the lowest magnification, look through the eyepiece as you would while aiming at a target. If the scope's windage and elevation adjustments are off center, you will see two images of the reticle (cross-hair). To reach the center of the adjustment range, simply turn the elevation and windage dials until you see only one image of the reticle.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Once the recticle is centered. What next?

I'm a scope bonehead. I would guess I would boresight using the peephole empty case method?

Thanks
ZM
 

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I have the same thing in an old Lyman 1.5 scope I have. When I sight in the rifle and get it shooting where I want it the cross hairs are off center. I really don't let it bother me, because it shoots where I am aiming. I think some of the older scopes seem to work that way. :grin:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I centered the recticle. After I got home from work I used the long hallway and did a bore sight using quickdtoo's instructions. Guess what? After bore sighting the crosshairs still sit noticably to the left. Redhawk1 may be correct when he says the old scopes may do this. Since this is a temporary setup I don't plan to fuss over it. A new scope is waiting in layaway.

Thanks
ZM
 

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Zeke, Redhawk is correct. In scopes like your ancient K4, the reticles actually moved when sighting the gun in, just like open sights. In fact, a big advertising campaign came about when the scope manufacturers developed the technology for "permanently centered crosshairs". That dates me I know, but even the cheapest of scopes nowdays have crosshairs that wont move during zeroing. It will all go away when you get your new scope.
Good luck and God Bless.
 
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