Graybeard Outdoors banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello, New member here. Very glad to find your forum. I just today got a Dan Wesson
357 nickle plated 8" barrel with ventilated rib but no under lug from a gun store.
Beautiful pistol. I took it to the range today and after about 35
rounds of remington 38 sp. The pistol started binding up. The hammer
would not come back far enough to turn the cylinder,but by rotating
the cylinder back and forth by hand it would chamber a round.This did
not feel like the safest thing to do so packed the pistol up. I do not
have a barrel tool to unscrew the barrel and I'm going to get a feeler
gauge in the morning. Does this sound like something that others have
experinced or should I try and get my money back when the gun store
opens on Tuesday. Thank you Robert
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
It was working fine at first, right? The first thing to check is the barrel/cylinder gap with a feeler gauge. It sounds like someone set the gap too small and powder residue is building up on the cylinder face. When it builds up enough it starts dragging on the forcing cone. If the b/c gap is less than .004" you need to re-set it. I think Dan Wesson actually recommends a b/c gap of .006". Less than .004" is too little, though.

I see this problem occasionally with Colt and Smith & Wesson revolvers that have excessive end-shake. The end-shake allows the cylinder to contact the forcing cone and gives the same binding problem after 20-100 rounds have been fired. The worse the end shake, the sooner the binding starts during a shooting session. It's possible that your Dan Wesson has excessive end shake, but more likely the b/c gap is just not set right. Still, check for end-shake by holding the gun up to a light so you can observe the cylinder gap and see if you can physically pull the cylinder forward enough to touch the barrel. If your barrel/cylinder gap is .004" or more and you can pull the cylinder forward enough to touch the barrel then you have an end-shake problem and you need to talk to the people who sold you the gun about a refund.

-Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thank you for your response. I used a feeler gauge today on the cylinder. I got .003-.003-.003-.005-.006.005. I don;t know if this will be a problem when I get the barrel changing tool. Do you think something is bent here or is this difference normal in the Dan Wessons? I will also check the end play.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
751 Posts
Is this an older model DW or the newer CZ? The older models finished the cylinders in the softer then heat treated and had an acceptable level of warp from heat treating. The Norwich factory treated prior to milling. My 357 max had an .002 difference and set at one piont made it bind at another. You can have the cylinder milled to a higher tolerance or if they have them at CZ get a replacement cylinder. In the mean time as I was told by DW; when I discovered my problem , is to set the gap at the closest point at slightly under the .006 and it'll work fine. My recommended gap is 002 so I set at 003 on the widest gap, until I had the cylinder honed to true.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Well, you have a nickel gun so machining the front of the cylinder to true it and then having the cylinder re-nickeled per Blhof's suggestion is an expensive option. Too expensive if you ask me, although that would be the best and most correct repair option.

You evidently have a .003" differential in b/c gap (.003" min, .006" max), assuming you were careful and accurate with the feeler gauge. The clock is ticking so far as getting your money refunded is concerned. You probably either need to return the gun for a refund very soon, or live with what you have. If you choose the latter option then my advice would be to set the b/c gap to .006" on the tightest cylinder. This will make the gap .009" on one of your chambers, which is above the factory recommendation, but this is for testing purposes.

If the above procedure allows the gun to function without binding through a 100-round shooting session then I would reduce the gap by .001" and repeat the 100-round test. Do this until the binding problem reappears and then go back to the last setting where no binding occurred.

Don't worry about the b/c gap being too large. Colt's upper b/c gap recommendation is .008" and you'll only be .001 above that limit.

You'll also need to verify that you are getting acceptable accuracy with the setting that works best. B/C gap can affect accuracy.

I guess if it was me I would evaluate how cheaply I got the revolver. If it was a bargain then I would probably keep it. If I felt that I paid full retail then I would see about getting my money back and buying one in better condition. Just my $.02.

-Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
yes I was very care full with the feeler Gage,did it about 4 times with the same reading.It was clean under the ejector rod also.I paid $424.00 out the door and now having to buy a barrel tool just to see if it sill work is starting to get expensive ,I feel that for that price it should be in really good shape. The gun dealers and pawn shops around here charge $75.00 to do a transfer so that really stops any online shopping. I am feeling to return the pistol if the gun store will take it back. There is a nice ruger gp100 6" stainless for $375.00 at another store that might be a better option. Thank you for your help
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I took the dan wesson to the range today after I made my own barrel tool out of a wrench and set the gap too. 005 on the tighest chamber. It bound up twice on the factory loads but when I wiped the cone and cylinder face it shot ok. Shot 100 rds. of 125gr., 3grains of trail boss in 38spl.and it fired those fine. I guess I will keep it thank you for all your help with this problem
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top