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Found a stainless .357 target model dan wesson with a 5 inch heavy barrel ,this is supposed be NIB but discontinued about 5 years ago the price is $335 . Is this a Good gun ? (I know most of the dan wessons have a decent reputation). Anybody know anything good/bad about these?
 

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:D YUP..it will do what ya want it to...I have had very little problem with any of the DW that i have owned over the years...unfortunatley i cant say taht for some of the other makes..go fer it....
 

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S Summer,
Wait no longer!!!!!!! Go to the DW web stie and check out the Alaskan Guide Special.-----------
 

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The Dan Wesson revolvers are investment cast guns. I have one that came apart like a hand grenade that I show in local Hunter Safety courses. Buyer beware!
 

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:blaster: The Ruger's are investment cast too, and are some of the strongest revolvers made. The Dan Wessons are some quality firearms.
 

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Flash, I beg to differ with you. Investment cast isn't as strong as the ones build from billet steel. Don't know where you've gotten your info from but your wrong. Investment cast is cheaper to produce, and that why W. Ruger chose to use it. He also sided with the government about the limiting of magazine capacity. Can't say that he was one of my heros. He always did thing cheaper(hense less expensive but not the same or better) than the other manufactureres. If you have much experience with firearms, you'll surely run accross the differences, quickly. Never saw a Ruger that had a good trigger job. Dan Wesson's call to fame was from the tension on both ends of the barrel (that's where his accuracy came from), not the investment case material. Probably why they didn't stay making revolvers.
 

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:) I realize that investment casting is the cheaper route and I never said that the Rugers were the STRONGEST but ARE in the ranks with the strongest. I don't know where you learned to interpret someone's dialog but you need some practice. I am in favor of the magazine capacity ruling and only because it could save someone's life. I don't look at the fact that it might hinder my ability to blast off 15 rounds into the hillside at record speed. I carry a weapon and it has 6 rounds in it. Oh. I forgot to mention.........it's a Ruger SP 101, my 15-2 is a little too large for that. Never had too much desire for 1911's as a carry weapon and I absolutely hate Smiths. I never tried a single action army under a blazer or sport coat. Whew, I am going to tremble at the teller machines with a cast weapon. At least my slugs aren't cast. Do you think the criminals would be disappointed in me for using a cast revolver? I'll bet they carry those fancy ones machined from billet steel and aluminum.
 

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Isn't it great to live in a country that allows free speech and thought. As for free enterprize, W. Ruger felt the same way about Smiths. At one time, he wouldn't allow distributers to carry his guns if they had Smiths in their inventory. Needless to say the ploy didn't work and Smith and Wesson survived. So did Ruger. By the way, I assume the 15-2 you mentioned is a Smith? All in all, one mans medicine is anothers poison. I just tryed to relate some of the facts. Sorry, it seemed to upset you.
 

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:D Yes, free speach is a wonder in itself the way the world is today. The 15-2 is a Dan Wesson 357 revolver. I wouldn't and never have owned a Smith. You didn't upset me at all. I was merely stating some facts myself, from my intrepretation of your dialog. Bill ruger was a pioneer that deserves respect while he rests. I cut my teeth on a standard model 22 while my Dad missed many rabbits with his Woodsman. The game, criminal or target doesn't know the difference when it comes to the firearm. It's whatever does the job correctly that satisfies us. Within safe pressures that will not stretch the top strap of a relvolver, a Ruger and a Dan Wesson are both quality firearms that have their own little charms about them. The "click, click, click" of an old model Blackhawk still sends me back to feel like Wyatt Erp, and for a lot less money than a Colt. Hence, the appeal. The Dan Wesson can wear a 10" shroud and tube for a nice meat gun, or a 2" for defense. Hence the appeal. Have a Merry Christmas and teach those youngsters how to spot cylinder "end play" and they'll not have a problem with a revolver coming apart on them.
 

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Where did you get the idea that end shack was the problem with the forementioned revolver?
 

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Unless it's an obstruction in the barrel or a double charge, the slop in the cylinder is what hammers the top strap until it stretches. The round that does the damage will either blow the cylinder wide open(obstruction or charge) or separate the strap at the rear site(cylinder gap). The crane latch is a good indicator too. Any wobble here and it's considered a paper weight by my standards. By the way, you refered to investment casting as the reason for the damage, not a double charge of 296 or mud in the muzzle. What else would make them come apart?
 

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Having loaded my share of 296, I don't think there is any way to double load this powder in a .357 case( maybe bullseye or 231). Most of the strength of investment cast frames, in my opinion, comes from casting them much bigger and heavier the billet steel frames, that are supposedly of the same strength. I speaking in reference to the Redhawk and super Redhawk and the Dan Wesson guns compared to let's say the S&W 29's. Since weight is a concerning factor in what revolver I would choose to carry all day. Also, in my experience, investment cast frames don't hold up to daily use. I've owned several Smith for over 25 years now and fired them with real magnum load on a regular basis. I've have friends who have tryed the investment cast frames who now own and use billet steel guns. Witness the grip screw on the Dan Wesson guns, several in our area gun ranges have stripped out very easily.
I have also seen barrel shrouds threads that won't hold up to the constant changes in barrels, isn't this a selling point for these guns? Of course, I grant you, I don't change the barrels on any of my guns on a regular basis. Just clean and try to keep ammo loaded for them and shoot them some more. Your favorite guns do have some good points, but you must admit, there must of been some reason why they didn't last in the market place. If your interested the prison system here in my state is useing the Mini 14 in .223. The aromorer constantly is working on them trying to keep them working. It's not just my opinion, it's most who have knowledge of the investment cast's track record. The only ones that I know that look and act good are the ones that lay in a safe or other secure area untouched.
 

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The 2 guns (Ruger and Dan Wesson) that the previous poster put down for being investment cast are 2 of the strongest revolvers on the market today, BAR NONE. A LOT of silhouette shooters put thousands of HEAVY rounds through the Dan Wessons without problems. Take a look at the IHMSA records owned by Dan Wessons, especially before they lifted the price limit. NO SMITH AND WESSON REVOLVERS HAVE EVER BEEN ABLE TO SURVIVE THE CRUCIBLE OF SILHOUETTE COMPETITION TO MY KNOWLEDGE. But Dan Wesson is legendary for both its strength and accuracy in the silhouette world with a strength record that even exceeded the very strong Ruger guns over long periods of heavy use. As far as service and parts, all that is available straight from the factory now. They have been under new ownership for several years now. As I have followed the company for 2 decades through its ups and downs and different iterations, I think they have finally found there niche. Instead of trying to compete with Colt and Smith and Ruger in the service pistol category like they did years ago, they are concentrating more on the specialty gun market now. The down side is that the guns are more expensive now (but still comparable to Smiths and Rugers). The up side is that they will proably be around for a long time. They always did build a fine gun, but I think they finally figured out how to build a fine company. They have not changed hands as many times as Smith & Wesson has in the last 20 years. The good part is that the guns are so dang strong, you rarely need parts or service.

I am a bit mystified at the following that the S&W 29 has among those who know they will need to fire heavy loads. The 29 is a fine gun in many respects and the quality of S&W is usually very good, especially their trigger pulls, but the 29 has always been too light for heavy loads making recoil painful and making the gun shoot loose during repeated use of any +P loaded ammo. Don't get me wrong. I like Smiths. I own them in other calibers and if I needed to carry a 44 Mag concealed for any reason, the 29 with 4" barrel would be a viable choice due to its relatively small size, but I would not fire heavy loads in it. Rugers and Dan Wessons are very strong, and even Taurus' are bigger and stronger than the Smith 29. Why risk your life or the life of others based on brand loyalty when the 29 has proven time and again they cannot handle a steady diet of heavy loads. I think their new 500 S&W Magnum (THE MOST POWERFUL PRODUCTION HANDGUN IN THE WORLD) will prove to be very durable since they have designed it specifically to address the weaknesses of the Model 29. Smith & Wesson consulted with the president of Dan Wesson during the developement of their new 500 S&W and used many features on their new gun that Dan Wesson has used for years. They redesigned the crane, went to a barrel/shroud arrangement and attachment just like Dan Wesson, increased frame size and weight, even reversed the direction of the rifling so that the impulse imparted to the gun when the bullet hits the forcing cone tends to CLOSE the cyliner crane as opposed to OPEN it as it does in the Mod. 29. The Performance Shop had to develope a special front crane latch to help keep the 29 closed and heavy barrels because of all the problems that developed with the 29 firing heavy loads. Of course this drove the price of the gun very high and still did not fully remedy the problems with the Mod. 29.

If you need to fire heavy loads, get a gun designed for it (i.e. Ruger or Dan Wesson), not the S&W 29.
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I have known a few Silhouette guys that swear by Dan Wessons and typically load far heavy than would ever do for my ruger blackhawk.

So, are the Dan Wessons capable of higher pressure than the Smiths (I have shot a few S&W's loose in the past and had a 629 that used to lock up after a few cylinders of factory rounds - one reason why I only have rugers now).
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If my life depends on it, I don't want a gun that may lock up when I need it most with heavy loads.


By the way, one answer to the previous question on the other forum:
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I can't speak for the large frame Dan Wesson revolvers, but I shot with a lot of guys who beat the pi$$ out of them shooting silhouettes with no problems whatsoever. I have two small frame Dans, a 357 and a 32-20. The 32-20 has only had 2-3000 rounds through it, from factory level to 357 plus levels. The 357 was my first centerfire handgun, I got it when I was 16 or 17. This revolver has had over 15K rounds through it, 10K of which have been heavy 180 grain loads. It is still tight and shoots as well or better than the day I brought it home.
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So in answer to the original post, the Dan Wesson is one of the finest guns you can buy at any price as far as accuracy, shootability, and durability goes. What else do you need from a gun.
 

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To Flash or anybody educate me

Flash said He approves the 10 round mag. limit because it my save someone's life. I am not being smart, but that has always been a mystery to me how a firearm could be safer with only a 10 round mag instead of a mag that holds 13, 15, 17 or whatever. What is the difference?
 
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