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i have a question about danger signs in shell cases from a revolver , as oppossed to looking for danger signs in shell case from a bolt action rifle. do we still look for the same danger signs on either casings. for one you dont have cases lenghthen in straight cases as you do a rifle case. what about bulging? Thanks for your help.
 

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Danger Signs

abj,

I guess the biggest danger sign will be sticky extraction. Next in line I look for flattened primers and obliteration of headstamps. After many reloadings the cases will begin to split from fatigue, especially the nickel plated ones. For longer case life, stay away from the hot loads. They not only wear out your brass but abuse your gun.

Loader 3009
 

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danger signs to look for in cases after fir

The ONLY dependable sign is when pieces fly off and you feel the blood running. Then you hope you still have all your fingers and eyes!

The .454 Casull operates at the same pressure level as the belted magnum rifle rounds which is to say the MAXIMUM of any SAAMI spec round out there. 65,000 psi. Even when you slightly over load it you're likely to notice nothing regarding the case that would be dependable in telling you that you are too hot.

By the time extraction gets sticky you are so far passed acceptable pressures by SAAMI standards that you are in blue pill proof range IF pressure is the reason. There are LOTS of other reasons for sticky extraction.

Just go by the book load recipes that have been pressure tested and you'll do fine. When you start making assumptions that you know more than the folks with pressure testing equipment and can judge for yourself how much more you can put in than they tell you is MAXIMUM then when you lose fingers or eyes you'll KNOW that was too much. You still won't know HOW MUCH too much.

GB
 

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Graybeard, what I get confused over......

I agree it is best just to stay within the load ranges in the books. But two examples I will use is the 357 Max and 44 Mag in the new Hornady Book. They are lower in the new book than their old books were by quite a bit. I shoot 20 Gr. of IMR 4227 in the 357 Max and 8 years ago when I started shooting it, it was a couple of grains below the listed max. In their latest book it is 1 gr. over the max. I was just comparing two Hornady books again last night and their are other calibers the same way. So then the decision must be made, which to use when you have used the old book for years with not problems.
 

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danger signs to look for in cases after fir

Bullseye. Until very recently MOST all of the loading data in the manuals was NOT pressure tested. They used the same old tired methods that have been preached for years of measureing case head expansion, looking at primers and feeling for sticky extraction.

NOW everyone is using pressure testing equipment and as a result they are bringing the loads down to what the equipment tells them keeps the pressures within SAAMI specs.

Just because it was ONCE recommended don't make it a SAAMI spec load. Just because it isn't now recommended don't mean it will blow up your gun. BUT it is a good indication it is over SAAMI spec by some amount. HOW MUCH over is the $64 question.

Once you've had the experience of a handgun blowing up in your hands you rethink the entire reloading process and what it is you REALLY want from your loads.

GB
 

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Agree 100% Graybeard

This difference in the books does not effect me much because I rarely load above mid range. I seem to get the best accuracy in the middle range with almost all calibers. The 357 Max is my one that likes the higher charges. I called Hornady when I got the new manual and one of their techs said the same thing you did, that they probably now have a pressure test barrel for the 357 Max. I still have been loading the 20 Grs., but the older I get this blowup in the face things bothers me enough that I just might try that 19 Gr. load.
 

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danger signs to look for in cases after fir

Bullseye.

I blew up a TC Contender in .44 Magnum. Another poster blew up a Ruger SBH also in .44 Magnum if memory is correct. These are considered by many to be the strongest handguns around and are the ones most often pushed to the limits. He and I can attest to the fact they can be pushed TOO FAR. It is NOT an experience you want I promise you.

GB
 
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