Graybeard Outdoors banner
1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,530 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just when I resigned myself to the idea that I would never hunt anything but local whitetails again, things change. :-\


Seems like one of my best buddies from high school has lived in Colorado for some decades now. Well he and his wife, they got married when she was 17 and he was 18, came through Atlanta and spent a couple of days with us. He and she implored Kathie and me to come out during elk season and hunt. Maybe mule deer also.


Well how could we refuse, their being such old friends and all... ::)


So now I have to decide which rifle I want to use: the 300 WM, the 338/06 or the 35 Whelen... :-\ And of course I'll need a backup. Maybe the 9.3x74R...


And I have to make that decision before I can even think about working up loads! More decisions like, should I stick with my old favorite 180 (30), 210 (338) and 225 (358) Nosler Partitions or 'speriment with some of the new super premium bonded and monolithic bullets... :-\


'course he said his longest shot has been 265 yards... maybe my 45-120 or 50-140 would stretch that far... :p
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,845 Posts
Take the 35 Whelen and leave the rest at home.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,611 Posts
Dee said:
Take the 35 Whelen and leave the rest at home.
HANDS DOWN!!

I got a similar offer for the 2010 season. Good lord said no few months before. :(

But I was ready. RL15 and a Nosler 225 Accu bond bullet it was shooting near MOA at solid 2500 fps.

CW
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,016 Posts
after reading thru your post , twice .. id have to say the 35 whelen with the your 'old favorite' load..

the caliber will do the job at hand in a first rate fashion, and your old favorite load is familiar to you , trusted by you and wont likely let you down if you do your part ..
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
656 Posts
Captain of Horse,
It seems to me you could go up to the Colorado air and space museum as a first step. Look around for an AH1 Bell Huey Cobra. You could then satisfy the article writers that claim no firearm is big enough to hunt with or carries enough in the magazine to be used in self defense. You could also go drone hunting.

Hodr
enjoy the trip, Colorado has some beautiful country
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,285 Posts
Sorry to be different.
The others are proven.
The calibers are bla bla bla.
But the 9.3x74R you put together recently has "" Bling ""
You will enjoy it more, get satisfaction from killing an elk or deer, and be the talk of the town.
You know you want too !!!

PS. If not then the 35 whelen is the one
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,618 Posts
All three are good choices. Even the back up rifles are good choices.
I use a 338 WM so I would say the 338-06 with 210 grain bullets
There are some merits to the 300WM. That being speed. The faster the bullet the less drop over range. So if you have a 300-400 yard shot the 300 WM with a 165 grain bullet will be fast and give you a flat trajectory and may give you the shot that the other calibers you would not take.
But more to the point I would take the rifle that is light, easy to carry, and shoulders well with your heavy hunting coat.
There will be a lot of walking up and down hills. Break in your boots.
As part of your getting ready, go to a local sporting goods store and buy a Step aerobics stick. They come in different weights. I own 9 and 15 pound sticks. They are about $20. When I go for my walks I will carry one getting ready for a hunt. They are about 4 feet long and I use them to simulate a rifle and treat them like one. Not using it as a walking stick. I start out with the 9 pound one (my 308 or my 338 are both about 9 pounds) and then start mixing in the 15 over time. While adding some water weight to a day pack to simulate the stuff I keep with me in the hunting pack for my morning walk. I do not use my hunting pack but one similar so the sweat does not stink it up for field use.
After a pig hunt in CA I wanted to get in shape for an Elk hunt to Montana. I took all the clothes (heavy cold weather stuff), pistol, ammo, gear(flashlight, GPS, Range Finder, Knife, Binoculars, and spare batteries), water, snacks, boots and the pack and threw them into a bin and weighed them. I started to work out with the goal to carry 125% of that weight in a day pack to get ready for the hunt. The air is a lot thinner where the elk run so adding weight will help you get ready for the thin air.
My daily schedule was take the Day Pack (adding 2 pounds a week) for a 5 mile walk with the 9 pound stick (adding the 15 pound stick one day a week after the first three weeks till I was only using the 15 pound stick) Get home drop the weight and run to the top of the driveway and back down to the house and work with the pellet rifle to make 4 good shots. Working on getting my muscles and breathing under control from different positions. During the first pig hunt we were running all over the country side seeing pigs and getting set up, but I could not settle down to make a good shot. Then taking time on the rifle range on the weekend shooting the rifle 4 or five times. In the evening I would take a second 4- 5 mile walk with just the 9 pound stick and often a Cigar.
Another thing you want to do to get ready is Play/ Work with your binoculars. Spend some time to work on ways to settle down and be able to use your binoculars keeping them steady and use items to make it easy to scan every inch of a hill side. If you are going to use shooting sticks for the binos also practice shooting with them. Again the pellet rifle in the back yard will help.
Good luck.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,530 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well how can I disagree with the opinions of so many men whose opinions I regard so highly!? The Whelen it is! :D And since no one has disagreed with the Nosler, the 225 gr. Partition gets the nod. That's settled. No, wait... I've got a Handi Whelen and a Remington Whelen! Sounds like a shoot-off to me! ;) Oh! And Tom! I've decided the 9.3x74R is too much of an unknown. I've never even shot it. I'll save it for a future moose hunt! I can hear Newfoundland calling my name as we speak! ;D


So, I started thinkin' about another rifle for a backup... :-\ I've got a lifetime supply of the long discontinued, 338 cal., 180 gr. Nosler BT's. They have been my deer bullet for my beloved '03 Springfield based 338/06. With BL-C(2) powder I can get velocities pushing 3K fps but have normally loaded it to 27-2800 fps. I know the bullet will hammer deer, but does anyone think it is to frangible for elk should it be pressed into service? ???

[/size]As always McWoody, you bring up a number of good points! I hadn't thought about clothing... :-\ or exercise... :( My friend did mention altitude sickness though! They live in the woods, on a mountain, at right around 7K feet. He says we need to come out a couple of days before season to get acclimated! Then I remembered that the Army required us to be on oxygen if we flew higher then 10K feet. Oh well, I have over a year to get ready! ;D [size=78%]
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,755 Posts
If you are taking two rifles you should also take a gun bearer. You know to fetch your gear and all. 😀


Seriously, if the Whelen won't do the job, you have an armored elk, and should run quickly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,384 Posts
I could cut you a 10 pound limb out of a tree and mail it to ya for twenty bucks. You could carry it around like Walking Tall and look cooler than if you had a store bought aerobics stick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,000 Posts
Richard,

Take the lightest rifle you think can do the job. Elk hunting usually involves a lot of hiking and an average of a week to find a good shot. I think having enough time is what makes the most difference. You may get lucky but if you want to increase your odds make sure you allow enough time for your hunt.

You have lots of good elk rifles. What I do is leave one with a friend where i like to hunt (out of state) so I don't have to take it back and forth. Sounds like you have a freind there in Colorado.

What are you gonna shoot with that big rifle back home?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,510 Posts
AtlLaw said:
. . . . :( My friend did mention altitude sickness though! They live in the woods, on a mountain, at right around 7K feet. He says we need to come out a couple of days before season to get acclimated!

you might want to make that couple of days a full week or so.
the first(only) time i went, it was all i could do to stagger for
6 steps or so then rest and suck up some 10,000 foot air.
it was like walk for 1 minute- rest for 2. no way to make headway.
the rest of the crew were in the same boat. they went back
the next year, acclimated for a week then hunted the next.
it sure ain't like oklahoma or arkansas at 2,000 feet. it'll make
a 7 pound bow feel like 70. much less trying to locate or make
a clean shot on anything or tote it down off the mountain.
this was years ago. i'd probably just die right off now.
good luck
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,225 Posts
Bagram is 5K feet and I could really tell the difference between there and St. Louis. I was only 33 and 215lbs back then. I can't imagine going there now and being expected to carry my ruck or rifle. A stairstepper should be helpful, but not all by itself. Walking hills with a pack will help too.

My vote is also for the 35W.

Thanks, Dinny
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,354 Posts
Along cheeseheads thinking. Let the scale make your decision, Gravity is unforgiving.

I have never ever wished I was carrying another 2lbs of rifle, and a quart less water. If your plan is to buy the cheapest bullet available use that Whelen, it is most able to put a cup and core bullet to optimum use. If it is the lightest more power to it.


Forum Obstructionist
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,530 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Ya know, you guys now have me curious about the weight of these rifles... :-\ I never worried about it before, but then I've never been 70 before! ::)


Think I'll also weigh the Whelen Handi for comparison. ;D


Shoot Cheese, I've got a M99A carbine in 308 that's not much more then that! And I've still got my former backup rifle, a M7 in 7-08. Not to mention the fact that I've still got a supply of old, as in discontinued, Nosler 160 gr. flat base bullets. These were what I used for the backup guns "shoot anything with" load.

This discussion is fun! :) Hi-ebber, and day is always a hi-ebber, my old school friend believes all one needs is a 30-06 and I agree with him. I also agree with Cheese's selection of a .308, and think my 7-08 would do the job.


Fact be known or admitted, most of the rifles in my safes would probably be up to it. Especially since I'm not a cross canyon shooter. My self imposed range limit is in the area of 250 yards. That evolved many years ago, I believe because of the High Power shooting I used to do; especially the shooting at the 2 and 300 yard lines. Of course sporting rifles have 'scopes and may arguably be more accurate then the 03's, Garands and M14's I used, but then again, hunting is not shooting at paper.


'sides, the poor bigger bores have been sitting around for years doing nothing except maybe popping a whitetail once in a great while. They need to stretch their legs! ;D That's why the 338-06 and Whelen got the nod! Y'all just named the primary! ;)


As for the 300 WinMag, it is the only belted Magnum I own. And I only own it because I got such a good deal on it from a friend. It's a pretty rifle as it wears a "Super Grade" stock, but unless I am planing to exceed my range limit I have no real need for it. :-\ Now, if I lived in the west, or Alaska, or Africa, it might have become my every day carry rifle! :)
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top