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Discussion Starter #1
After heading back from the unloading table, usually a two trip job for me--long guns first, then back for the cases and hulls, I usually shake the cases in my hands.
This does two things: first, it removes some of the dirt and leaves and "junk" that was collected when the brass was picked up, and

second, I can listen to the sound that the brass is making as it is being shaken. If there is a split case in the batch I usually hear a much higher sound (like a tinkle-- :wink: --don't go there). This is a pretty good sign that there is a split case in the batch. If I have time I'll try to weed it out, if not I'll know it's there when I get the cases out of the tumbler and put them in the loading blocks. If I still have missed it when I go to resize it there will be no resistance and that will definitely tell me that something is wrong with that case. (If I run .44 or 44/40 through I get the same zero resistance and can catch them, too)

ÇR
 

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Did you ever notice that split cases sound

Yup! I've noticed that! :)
 

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split cases

Back when I loaded hundreds of 45acp for IPSC style shooting, I would sort my brass by sound. If you dig out a handful from your bag and pour it from hand to hand, you will hear a split case if there is one, and only have to search that particular handful, it speeds up the search.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Did you ever notice that split cases sound

When I was shooting revolver in USPSA (talk about not being competitive) I was known to load cases that were only split "a little bit." Figure the cylinder wall was thick enough ;>)

I figured it I got to the primed and power loaded stage then I'd throw it out next time it came around.

CR
 
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