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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of the many unique features of our sport is that the targets are of four different shapes, all asymetrical. Does anybody have any tips they'd be willing to share about different approaches to different targets? Maybe this is really basic stuff but I've been slow to develop a plan I can stick with.
I know it's important to find a point on the target, either imagined or an appropriately located paint chip. Let's assume flawlessly painted targets. Where should that point be?
I tend to look for a spot a little above center on the chicken, where it's wider, and approach from below. Lately my misses have been over the top.
I try for the tallest part of the pig, under the hump and over the front leg. I try to pretend that aiming area is round and funnel the sight into the center of it. Most of the misses seem to slip under the jaw.
The turkey loses height rapidly as the shot slips tailside. I've been trying to settle the dot just behind the neck at the top edge of the body and break the shot as the rifle settles slightly lower.
The ram has plenty of length but is hurting for elevation. I've been trying for just behind the shoulder, somewhat headside of center thinking, perhaps, that some bad shots will catch the horns or the front leg. Can't be good to plan for bad shots. Maybe I should be working on an approach-break as the dot swings in from the front.
Anybody feel moved to help me out? Thanks in advance.
 

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Ajj, assuming you are right handed were do you hold the rifle with your left hand – a close hold or a long hold? Are you able to hold on the targets and if so how long for? Are you talking rimfire, centrefire, air or all of them?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Aus: Right-handed, hold as close as possible with the wrist against the trigger guard. Presently thinking of smallbore. I can usually hold within the target for a few seconds after a brief settling period and before I need air but, as we all know, holding while we break the shot complicates the hold part somewhat. I try to let the dot settle as I break the shot. Sometimes I accept a non-center aiming point if the dot has settled well but I do try to find a spot on the target, real or imagined.
 

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ajj,
You're hitting plenty of em already!!! I know, we always want a couple more. Problem seems to be when one gets to your level gains come harder and harder. You don't seem to be getting much input from the Pros so's I'll give ye a "hillbilly $.05 worth.
Last fall I went to drawing circles in the most strategic places on my SB targets, circle say 1" or so where if it's missed there's still a good chance of hitting the animal. (this on paper). Had quite an effect , seem to shoot for the circle instead of the animal. "aim small--miss small" I can't say if it helped any or if it was just the practice itself as far as regular targets go.
By drawing the circles it did give focus to the best percentage area to go for.
"Over the back of turkeys"-- I've heard that from a lot of shooters at all levels. shape of the thing seems to draw you up there where the slightest breeze can take you off. However--- and this is me--I've often found that the tensions in me are changing during a match resulting in my head comming up off the comb, inconsistant cheek pressure. And it does result in verticle!!! If I could just recognize it happening before the match was half over. I've also taken to setting my zeros with the dot on the back line of the animals, objective no over the tops. as that's where most of the misses are anyway,,,,not super low mind you, just hedging it a bit. (they still go over)
Sorry we missed you guys on the 22nd, not enough hours in some weeks. we are gonna get down there at least once before the season is over. Any of the Benton bunch gonna do Phoenix? I hear it's supposed to be alot like Ridgway,PA on a beautiful spring day!!!!!! (that ought to get a responce)
Oh yeah--was given the ultimate training advice once from an all time world class champion in another sport that may have relevance to us. His input "don't miss". you'll win ever time. Also "relax---enjoy---don't smoke!!!" NOW you tell me how to combine those last three and we're on our way partner!!!
Carroll
 

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aim point and holding

I know people that hold on the animals different. eg. on the chicken they hold on the foot..... to force a tighter aim point. Then between the legs on the pig. on the leg on the turkey and between the legs on the rams. It will force you to hold tighter or a smaller circle
mbj
mi
 

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I've been stuggling with rams and find most of the misses are due to elevation. Gross windage misses (for myself) are usually due to jerking the trigger. So . . . I've started leveling the X-hairs on the top of the back and that seems to have helped. On Ram's I'd say elevation is the bigger chunk of the equation. Turkey's are the opposite.

Pigs I miss because I get over confident and let marginal shots go.

Chickens have become a real PIA, I had a hard time shooting for the centre of the shape so I started aiming for where the leg meets the body. I do get more hits but occasionally a shot sneaks by under the tail or breast.
 

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Since I know I can't completely eradicate my wobbles, I try to keep a verticle wobble on the Turkeys and horizontal wobbles on the other animals. Crazy as it sounds, accepting muzzle movement while giving it shape seems to work well for me.
 

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Is that you Alston?

G'day ol' friend,
Lost your addy ages ago, and haven't tried finding you until I started seeing some posts from you.
I have just started back up with silhouette and am enjoying it very much.
How have you been and whats been happening?

Cheers,
Stuart
AKA: stu in oz :grin:
 
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