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Dinny sent me some pics & asked me to post for him. He has poor cell reception. But wanted everyone to know. He is havin fun!

He said it was a long miserable drag!! His legs are rubber!

Dropped him outta the tree but needed a second shot. Thinks both good & solid. Bears treed by dogs have adrenalin up. Can be tough to anchor!!

He used his 357 Maxi and my cast 270g (Accurate 36-270c )bullets.

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CONGRATULATIONS DINNY!
 

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Very cool ! I thought he was going to use his 348 Win. handi for bear hunting but sometimes your mind tells you to grab something different.
Congrats Dinny !

jedman
 

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Ya done good Dinny!!! Brian, thanks for helping Dinny get the pics posted. Nice bear! I know you've worked for it. Our best wishes for the Holidays for you guys and yours from Patty and I.

Pete
 

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Congratulations Dinny.

Beautiful creatures they are. Hunting with dogs is the best. Are you hooked now?
 

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Way to go , Dinny, congrats! I sure hope it's better eatin than the last fall bear I ate, even the sausage was bad, bear roasts weren't fit for a dog. I suspect it had been eating gut piles since it was near the of deer season which prolly didn't help, they are what they eat, after all. If it had been a spring bear, maybe it would have been better, but I don't look forward to shooting another.

Tim
 

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So very good to see, thanks a heap for the pictures, we were wondering how it worked out, and now I have some reserch to do.... a 270 grain bullet out of a 357, wow!
blessings
 

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Nice one Dinny! Congrats!
 

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Atta boy Dinny. You mean it doesn't take a super belted magnum to kill a bear. A big slow boolit over a little fast one every time. Elmer Keith vs Jack 'O. I like Elmer!

Congrats on your successful hunt.
 

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That is great! I wish that we had black bears instead of black pigs.....

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk
 

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Way to go Dinny. Congrats on getting your bear. When you get back to good cell reception we all want DETAILS. Take care, John.
 

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Very Cool Dinny. :tango_face_smile_bi

I am envious.

Hunting bear is still on my wish list.
 

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Thanks Brian and others! I'm not home yet, but I'm on my way. The 348 Handi was just too heavy to pack around the 3000ft mountains/hills here in Western Virginia. I will post more after I get home, unpack, shower, and rest a bit. My dogs are barking and I'm not talking about the canines.

Thanks, Dinny
 

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So here's the long-awaited story about how I got my first bear.

I made a friend on the 24hrcampfire website who traded me a bunch of 348 Winchester components. He's a retired gunsmith who lives in NE Kentucky and I was fortunate enough to meet him during one of my trips back home last year. We got talking about bear hunting and he told me about a nice Christian family he had hunted with years ago in Highland County, VA. He linked me up with them and they told me to come out for the dog-running season this year. Not having ever run bears with dogs, I was in for a treat!

Day 1: We drove to the top of Shenandoah Mountain which has an elevation of nearly 3000ft. We walked down the mountain with about 20 dogs in search of a hot trail where a bear had walked through recently. After about 6 hours and 7-10 miles later we never struck a single trail. There were very few sightings of any acorns anywhere and we didn't see a single deer nor squirrel. It had seemed that the bears were nowhere to be found.

Day 2: We walked 5-7 miles this day looking for a trail to follow. After about an hour in the woods we had something the dogs were really interested in. The two oldest dogs were released and tracked with GPS. After they set off on a beeline, other dogs were released a minute apart until about 10 of them were in what seemed to be hot pursuit. Watching the GPS we saw the two lead dogs start circling in one area, the other 8 dogs spit up enroute to the lead dogs location and soon all the dogs were wandering aimlessly. It seems that the bear had given them the slip and probably dipped into a den tree or crossed water or something that made the dogs lose the trail.

Day 3: We got a hot tip across the radio that an old-time bear hunter was out hunting rabbits with his beagles and had come across a fresh bear track in soft mud that froze overnight. We drove to that location and waited to release our dogs until the hunter had all his beagles back in the truck. We turned our dogs loose and walked down some old log trails in an area that was clear cut 10 years ago. It seemed like a good area withe alot of dense shrubbery and briars. It wasn't long and the dogs were on the trail. We lost sight of the dogs within seconds of them striking the trail and it wasn't much longer we couldn't even hear them barking anymore. The GPS tracker showed them heading to an area called Benson's Ridge about 2 miles away. We were about halfway back to the trucks when one of the guys yelled out that the dogs had "tree'd". We drove around towards Benson's Ridge and checked the GPS after we parked as close as we could get to the dogs' location, which was 1.37 miles away. I was told it would be a long uphill walk so I dropped my backpack, sweatshirt, and proceeded up with just my rifle. I have to admit that my adrenalin only got me so far. After about a mile of walking across loose rocks and fallen over hemlocks I was really starting to slow down and think about the trip back downhill. Myself and the next youngest guy had set out ahead of the older men. We got to the bear's tree about 15 minutes ahead of the others. The other guy started tying the dogs to nearby trees while I provided his security from a bear that could come down the tree at anytime. When two of the other guys got about 50 yds away and the last dog was tied to a tree, the bear started down the tree on the side opposite of me. I yelled to the other guy and he started to unsling his 30-30 lever gun. About that time the bear decided to slide around the tree towards me and I aimed for his shoulder while he was still sliding down rear first. At the shot the bear let go and fell about 30 feet to the bottom of the tree and rolled to the bottom of the valley. I thought for sure it was dead but before it came to a stop, it started back up the other side of the valley. The guys in the bottom were pretty excited and told me to shoot it again, which I was already on him and turned another 270gr LFP loose while he was running. He stumbled and slowed but didn't drop like I was hoping. I fired one more time and missed that running shot. By this time the guy near me was able to fire off his 30-30 and anchored the bear with a hot to his rear end. The 3 shot I had fired were all the rounds I had on me. I had forgotten that earlier in the day some of the ammo was coming loose from my buttstock ammo carrier and I placed the other 6 rounds in my backpack and kept those 3 in my pants pocket. I borrowed some one else rifle to check the motionless bear for life. Luckily for me he was dead. The rest of that afternoon is somewhat a blur. I remember cutting a slot across the bear's nose so we could attach a dog lease to it and drag it out. After that, I dragged that bear for wheat seemed forever. When CW says my legs were rubbery, he wasn't kidding! I would stop to take a breather every so often and would often feel light headed. I haven't ever had to hunt in terrain that rugged. I got some help fro others to get the bear back to the truck and enjoyed to the short ride back to camp. That night I took the bear in to a check station and skinned and quartered it afterwards. I was asleep before my head even hit the pillow that night!

Day 4: We woke to fresh snow and one of the guys yelling at everyone to get it up so we could be the first ones to see bears tracks crossing the roads. There were literally dozens of other bear hunters in this area and everyone was driving the roads that morning looking for tracks. I spent almost 8 hours in a truck and never saw a track anywhere. No one found any tracks crossing any of the roads were drove that day. Seems the bears are all in for the season except the rare occasional wanderer.

Day 5: While driving over towards Ramsey's Draft someone spotted some bear tracks coming off a hill side and crossing over Hwy 250. The dogs were turned loose and circled around in the same area for about an hour. The bear probably slipped into a den tree. I left town at about 1000 and that ended my first successful bear hunting trip.

All in all I had a great time and learned to really respect good dog hunters. They trained their dogs to only follow bear tracks and to work together and not to fight. These were the most skilled and fit hunters I've ever hunted with. I hope the Army doesn't send me anywhere too far away for my final assignment next summer and I'm able to hunt with those great folks again.

The 357 Maxi is a very bear capable cartridge and I wouldn't hesitate to use it again given the chance.

Thanks, Dinny
 

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