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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Most of my hunting is in the brushy Mo. Ozarks, oh sometimes you might get a shot across a power line or small pasture. I've always sighted my rifles in at2" high at 200 yds. and seldom miss unless it is running. Of course it might help with my Ml. But I also need a good pair of WARM boots. The older you get the colder you get, at least in my case.
I found a nikon prostaff # 440 range finder on sale for 179.00 (are they any good ?) Could use a suggestion on some warm boots. I mostly sit and watch trails.
 

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I'm not sure about the Nikon range finders, but my wife got me a Bushnell range finder and I love it. I've never been that good at judging distance - sometimes I was on sometimes I was off. Now I know exactly what the distance is and where I need to aim. For me it just helps me ensure I'm going to be on. If you can swing it; then go ahead and get it.
 

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My wife gave me a Nikon 800 for Christmas last year. I spent a lot of time playing with it. I learned that my field estimations were way off. That properly sighted, flat shooting rifles have been saving my bacon. One area I hunted this year was a plantation with long semi open shooting lanes. I thought the rangefinder was very useful. The first day I hunted the plantation I carried a 30-30 Marlin with a 4x scope. After checking out the area with the range finder on a following hunt I carried a .270 with a 3x9 scope.

In the pre-season I scouted an area, and used the rangefinder to determine the maximum range in an area. I did not carry the rangefinder on the day the season opened in that area. I was comfortable with the sighting arrangement on my rifle and had practiced with it. I intentionally left the rangefinder behind, because I felt it had done its job in the pre-season. If I had hunted in an area that presented 300-400 yard shots I would have carried the rangefinder. I learned during the pre-season it is better to use the rangefinder to pre-determined the field of fire, for the lack of a better term. If the maximum range of the field of fire falls within the Point Blank Ranger of the rifle I am carrying I need not carry the rangefinder.

I am reaching the saturation point. I only want to carry so much gear with me. I have become a victim of the modern hunting era. When I started out I carried a canteen, extra ammunition, a lunch stuffed in small surplus invasion pack, rope, pocket first aid kit, knife, binoculars, and compass.

While the additional gear I carry only adds a couple of pounds there has to be a limit. I should note that at times my hunt takes me a few miles from my vehicle.

The Nikon 800 has a high quality 6X glass and is very clear. And at no time did it fog on me. It is guaranteed to be fog and waterproof. I am more then happy with it. I had asked Santa for the Nikon 400 because of the recommendation a hunting partner made. A relative of his and others did some field-testing of Bushnell Rangefinders and the Nikon 400. At the end of the day he felt the Nikon suited him better.

I am looking forward to using it while coyote hunting.
 

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I'd take the WARM boots over the range finder every time!

In all the years i've been hunting i've yet to buy a range finder....

I sight my rifle 2" high at 100, and then check it at 200 and 300... I've just never needed to shoot into the next county to get some meat!!

DM
 

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IMHO

If you do alot of walking to get to your stand, the boots would be my choice. I'd prefer not to have aching feet after a week of long walks..... If not, buy thinner boots, a few extra pairs of wool socks and some toe warmers.... Personally, i'd always rather buy better constructed boots with less insulation, to keep down on cost. This also helps if you hunt a region where temps can go from hot to cold in a day, like here in Texas...

Then buy a cheaper rangefinder and use it to teach yourself more accurate range estimation(especially if your shots rarely if ever pass 250 yd).... And like the the other person said, use it to range specific landmarks and shooting lanes

I agree with the other guys.... a rangefinder is nice, but not essential... keeping warm, and taking care of your feed IS essential....

Hunting is a good allegory for life itself.... prioritize everything, and take joy in the little things.... like warm feet and a toilet :D

Now get out there and enjoy yourself.... Something tells me that you're like me, and will enjoy it even if you dont have a rangefinder... Happy Hunting
 

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I bought one recently, never had one, never even used one but and thought it would be a "nice to have"

I am not really good at judging longer distances, 250-350 is hard for me to guage and out at 300 - 400 yards they start dropping fast...

Like some one else said about having very accurate and flat shooting guns have saved my bacon :)

I have been playing around with it and it's sure interesting, I got the Leupold RXII, very nice

like someone else said, guaging varying points in my "field of fire" is good
I am also teaching my son to hunt and to me, 100 or 200 yards, doesn't really matter
to him, 200 yards is a long way out there and I don't think he's ready for clean and consistent kills
I also am doing more handgun hunting and
 

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was given one , tons of fun to play with ! got a good education on judging distance too ! i seldom carry it as with you shot are short , but the ability to judge distance has improved and boy the bets ya can win with friends !
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Appreciate all the sound advice. I'm going for the boots ! After this heart attack I don't get far from the truck but I must have warm feet. I spent the last hour going through Cabellas boot section. I'm not rich but are there any boots in that book you could reccomend ?
 

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Look at the "Whitetail Extreme". They come in several different weights of insulation from 400-1200grams I think. They are an 11" boot, and the way they support my BUM Ankles is great. I have a pair of Rocky Bear Claw II's in 1000 gram, and a pair of the Whitetail Extremes in 800gram. I haven't needed to wear the Rockies since I bought the Whitetails. But I haven't hunted in Very Cold conditions since either. If it drops into the single digits or below I'll see how they work then. But I have to say they are a good boot for the cost, I'm happy with mine.
 

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I could not live without a range finder. I often don`t carry it when deer hunting, but I like to shoot varmints at long range and you just can`t guess yrd. close enough.
 

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I've got the Leica LRF 800, I use it for Bowhunting and when I go out west Mule Deer hunting. If I had to choose I'd go with warm boots. If you find a good pair that keeps your feet warm let me know which brand you bought. I have the same problem with my feet too. I bought a pair of LaCrosse 10" Hunting Pac 2000 GM boots this year and they are light weight, comfortable to wear but when I sit in the cold my feet still get cold. Must be old age.
 

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i got the Cabela's pull on zip up made out of 3mm neoprene and insulated !
used um in Canada last year in 3 day ice/rain storm temp was cold ! wind was 25-60 mph feet stayed dry and warm !
 
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