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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Guys,


This question relates specifically to the standard Winchester 94s, with their factory semi-buckhorn sights.


Does any body actually use them to hunt with? I can see that maybe, out west where there are no trees and long open prairies, that you might be able to get a clear, decent sight picture on a broadside shot for standing deer, but east of the Mississippi, in normal hardwood forests, are they a viable hunting sight at even close range?


Thanks for all experiences.


Mannyrock
 

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I use them on my hog rifle. Or should I say they are on my hog rifle. Up close and personal I don't really use sights. Since I am half blind they are there for alignment more than aim.
 

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If I was buying a 94, it would have to be an angle eject.
 

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When I was 15 years old I bought my model 94 and used it with the factory open sights for the first 4 or 5 years I hunted with it before I put on a receiver sight. I had no problems hunting with those sights back then, but with my eyes now I might just as well shoot blindfolded as try to hunt in the woods with the factory sights!
 

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I like full buck horns better but YES, as long as you can still see them they work fine. :) Marbels makes a nice set. They are actually on my newest rifle. Henry Octagon 22 maggie! ;D ;D ;D

CW
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the replies.

I guess that for deer hunting out to 100 yards, you would sight in a semi-buckhorn by putting up a 6 inch black bull, and then using a six o'clock hold on it? So that the front bead is down into the tiny round cut-out of the rear sight, and the bull sits on top of that?


I've never done it, but it seems that if it was sighted in that way, you could aim at the bottom edge of the deer's chest, and put rounds up into the heart area?


My wife use to do all of her deer hunting that way with one of the original TC Hawkins rifles, bought in 1978. She set it up so that all she did was wait for a broadside shot, hold even with the bottom edge of the deer's chest, and fired. She never new exactly what part of the vitals she would hit, but after the smoke cleared, she had always plowed a .50 caliber hole through the middle of the chest area, and the deer went down. She killed alot of deer that way. It kinda drove me crazy that her rifle was sighted in like this, because you couldn't get a tight group from the bench. But she would always say, "I'm killing deer, not shooting ground hogs."


Mannyrock
 

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cwlongshot said:
I like full buck horns better but YES, as long as you can still see them they work fine. :) Marbels makes a nice set. They are actually on my newest rifle. Henry Octagon 22 maggie! ;D ;D ;D

CW
Actually, I prefer the semi-buckhorn Marbles sight. On all my rifles (and there are several) with open sights, I replace the factory sights with the Marbles semi-buckhorn rear sight, and a Marbles 3/32nd" bead front sight. That larger front sight helps with my "old" eyes to see it, and I can shoot some really nice groups with open style sights. The secret to shooting open sights well is to have those open sights adjusted correctly, and to practice frequently. I have aperture sights on several rifles, and I like to use them as only the blade front sight covers any part of your target, thus you can see more of your target. I own more rifles without optics than those with optics. For me, a rifle sans the scope is a much lighter and handier rifle to hunt with than the same rifle scoped. I'm all about light weight, and my Remington 700 with Leupold bases and rings and a Ziess scope weigh way too much. It's the most accurate rifle I own, but nowadays, it always get left at home, and I'm usually carrying a Marlin carbine when on the hunt. I'm getting too old to carry all that extra weight.
 

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I like a deep v rear sight with skinny post and bead front sight. A shallow v can be easily modified with a file.

VV something like below. VV
 

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mannyrock said:
I guess that for deer hunting out to 100 yards, you would sight in a semi-buckhorn by putting up a 6 inch black bull, and then using a six o'clock hold on it? So that the front bead is down into the tiny round cut-out of the rear sight, and the bull sits on top of that?


I've never done it, but it seems that if it was sighted in that way, you could aim at the bottom edge of the deer's chest, and put rounds up into the heart area?. . . . .

Mannyrock

i never could shoot good with that aiming style, although there are a lot that do. a friend that was quite
the accomplished silhouette shooter zeroed and aimed that way. he said it was to prevent target panic.
i've always zeroed my sights to hit wherever the bead was at. right in the middle. i figure if my animal
moves an inch or two in one direction or the other i'll still be right in the pump house. it hasn't failed me yet.


of course, everyone is different, and should use the style that they can hit with accuracy and consistency.
and practice often. very often. quite often. not a week before the opener.


good luck
 

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I have used these type of sights but with Winchester 94 and Marlin 336 I prefer a Williams Receiver sight (peep sight). I sight in with the insert and then unscrew it for hunting like a ghost sight. Gives a longer sight radius and thus more accurate. With peep sights I generally zero it at 75 yards. This makes it good for me to about 150 yards which is fine for a .30-30.
 

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I use my Winchester 94 .30-30 with the factory issue sights, and trust it to 200yds on deer and hogs and to 300yds on paper, but then again, I tend to prefer irons for most things anyway on most of my guns, so I am a bit prejudiced.
 

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dpastordan said:
[/size]
I have used these type of sights but with Winchester 94 and Marlin 336 I prefer a Williams Receiver sight (peep sight). I sight in with the insert and then unscrew it for hunting like a ghost sight. Gives a longer sight radius and thus more accurate. With peep sights I generally zero it at 75 yards. This makes it good for me to about 150 yards which is fine for a .30-30.
[/size]


That was my preferred approach to setting up a ******* assault rifle. Williams FP, sight it in, and toss the insert into the drawer. Ghost rings before ghost ring was a cool tattykill term. Add in the sling swivels and sling the gun muzzle down (one reason I like trappers) on the off shoulder and it's a fast flip up, into the shoulder and on target.


I have noticed that it depends on when the Winchester was made as to how useful the back sight is to me. Some of the sight combos still work for me and these old eyes that were never 20/20 to begin with. Others I take one look and say, "Nope."


While I'm a big fan of the receiver sight and a nice gold or ivory bead post when I picked up my little Puma 92 Trapper used it had fiber optic sights on it. As it was handed to me from behind the counter I thought, "Yeah, those have to go. Peep and post required." Then I popped the gun to my shoulder and everything snapped neatly into place. I figured I should at least try them at the range. I did. I even took a deer with that gun at about 80-90 yards. Suffice to say, that gun is staying just the way it is. Molly is just fine with her red headed front sight.


But, with the Winchester factory sights it all depends on the sight.
 
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