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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have heard of some folks who just partial resize stright wall cases. Does it do any good at all?
 

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Does anyone partial resize stright wall cas

OLDMAN,

Yep, I sure do for certain handgun rounds. I do for the 38, 357, 44, and 445SM. I especially do it if I am using slightly oversize cast bullets. This helps to eliminate a bulge that can occur at the depth the bullet is seated. I do believe it helped accuracy in my Contender but not sure about cylinder guns (maybe?). Good-luck...BCB
 

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Does anyone partial resize stright wall cas

cknight98,

I size just the amount of a straight-walled case as the depth I am seating the bullet. This allows the rest of the cast to be "blow out" sort of and as the bullet is seated, it increases the diameter of the brass and it approaches or equals the diameter of the fired and unsized portion of the case. If the case is completely resized, the seated bullet may increase the diameter of the case to a greater width than the sized portion, thusly, the bulge at the base of the seated bullet. If your partially sized case will chamber, it is the way to go in my opinion. Mark the side of a fired case with a line from a magic marker and begin sizing the case a bit at a time. I generally put a case in the press and move the case to the full up postion. I then screw the sizing die down to touch the case and start the sizing process. I screw the die in a bit each time I size the case. The mark will lighten and let you know how much of the case you are sizing. When I get to the approximate depth of the seated bullet, I lock the sizing die and reload ammo. Good-luck...BCB
 

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Does anyone partial resize stright wall cas

The buldge in the neck of a straight-wall case indicates you are getting a good amount of case neck tension. This will go much further to consistency in your loads and preventing bullet jump than one can ever get by crimping(critical in some revolver loads). As far as whether or not to full length size a case, why would someone want to set themselves up for a failure to feed or chamber when you may just need to do so.
 

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Does anyone partial resize stright wall cas

Full length sizing a straight wall case will give you a "coke bottle" effect. Easier to visually see on 357 Max and some of the longer straight wall cases. It does cut back on powder capacity, but is only really noticable if using full cases or compressed loads. It also works your brass a little more, big deal, one less firing. My loads are more accurate sizing only about the depth of the seated bullet. New brass, range brass, etc are full length sized first time. Once fired in my gun, it stays with that gun until no longer useful. Rarely, if ever, full length sized again. Only straight wall case that I ever loaded that would not chamber was due to over tight crimp casing case to bulge near the rim. Anything going out hunting or for protection is checked into the firearm before it goes into the box.

Have a great day. Choose those techniques that work for you.

Steve
 

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Does anyone partial resize stright wall cas

The most consistent .45 Colt loads I have ever chronographed and shot were constructed using a .45 ACP sizing die (full-length) and a a .44 Mag expanding die to bell the case mouth. The SDs for these loads were 1 for several different testings. Previous testing by the loader also yielded the same results.

I have loaded .475 Linebaugh cartridges and been able to see the location of the grease grooves imprinted on the case wall. As I stated in my earlier post, it is case neck tension and not crimp that really grips the bullet and allows consistent ignition of large charges of slow burning powders.

Back when I was making .445 Supermag cases out of .303 British, the cases would be wasp-waisted prior to fireforming. My fire-forming loads were reduced about 10% under regular loading. I would dare say one could experience charge weight variations due to changing powder lots as much as whether or not a case had been full-length or partially sized. Everyone does work up to a max. loading when a new can of powder is opened, don't they?

As far as accracy goes, I load .445 Supermag in .44 Special dies and my silhouette load shoots 2" at 200 meters. Plenty good enough for "minute of ram". There is a visible buldge from the Sierra bullet I shoot in it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Does anyone partial resize stright wall cas

Hitman,
No sir, I do not work up my loads on every new can of powder I buy. I also do not shoot max loads. I am at least 1 grain shy of max and the largest caliber I shoot is the 44 mag. I do not think I need to work up a load on each can of new of powder.
Now using the info above if a lot of you folks think I should work up loads with each can of new powder please let me know. In fact I hope I get a lot of replies which will give me a few opions on what others think.
Thanks Hitman for your reply
 

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Does anyone partial resize stright wall cas

If you are working with the same lot# of powder - no need to rework loads. If you are getting a can of a different lot#, I'd say drop down from your favorite grain weight and work up. Never know what "new technology" they'll use in a different lot.
 
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