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I just recieved permission to trap on a guy's farm. I hadn't even seen it before. It's a 45 miles away. I knew he had a lot of land but, I really didn't know how much. He has one area that is 4 miles wide and 3 miles long :shock: . I was hopefull that there was a little creek on it or something. Nope! just pasture. I've been trapping alot different terrain than this. I don't even know where to start. It was real dry here this summer (just like everywhere) and the grass in the pasture is real short. So, that kind of rules out snares. I'm not sure what sets to make or where. I was thinking of post set on the ridges if I can find any sign. Can anyone help? :)
 

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I use a bunch of snares, many in wide open pastures. Yes I'd perfer brush and thick grass but I live in New Mexico! If you have good trails you can hang a snare using a 1/4 inch rod about 30 inches long. On the top spot weld a 24 inch lenght of 11 ga. wire; (while the wire is still hot you can wrap it once or twice around the rod to remove the stess from the weld). On the bottum of the rod hammer a flat spot like a spear point, this will keep the rod from spinning. The 11 ga. will hold the wammy and you can hang the snare over a trail with the support 2 feet to the side. I don't no how many I've taken with this rig but the carcasses would make a dandy pile!!! I wish I could claim the invention but John Graham got to it first. I use small cable and ambergs with good results ; cats too! I'd hang them for the first time during the dark phase of the moon. :wink:
 

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obviously, you have either trapped this by now, or decided to let it go..

big pastures are perfect spots for footholds-

Look first to any high points, cut banks, etc. A high spot might just be inches higher than the surrounding area, but it makes a difference.

and in a big pasture with short grass (grazed) you are going to have cow trails and 2 tracks. check out the main intersections- a couple of dirt holes under a sage or yucca on an elevated point near at this intersection will be very productive.

Use whatever visuals you have- a big rib bone for example with a couple of sets near it, will pull coyotes a long ways.

any badger diggings, gophers or PD diggings are also must spots to look and most likely set up.

remember that in a "featureless" area- ANY structure, feature will be a point.

look at the flow- along "color" lines (different textures grasses, colors, density, etc)- I often make setso n2 shades of grass in new/old hay plantings. Even if the grass is 100% the same grass, heighth, etc- they follow it for long distances.


When everything else fails for location- look for the prominent habitat areas that you CAN SEE- they don't have to be close by- and set up the line from A to B- remember that coyotes in this type of location, will "flow" following the easiest path more times than not.
 

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At first I thought Oso and Wacky had rejoined us,then I looked at the date--over 5 years old.
Wonder if Oso ever trapped it.
Tom
 
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