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We attended our first CAS this weekend and my gunsmith brought my new Yellow Boy ('66, slicked up and different sights) to the range so I shot it. The first stage looked into the sun and I immediately noticed the sun reflecting off the brass frame and right into my eye, making it very difficult to aim. This is a new rifle so the frame is still highly polished. Is there a way to age, or dull this thing up so the sun does not reflect of it. Any "coachin'" here would be appreciated.
 

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:D
You could mask off the area that you get the problem from with tape or take your gun to someone with a sand blaster and have them shoot it with glass bead in that area . :cry:
 

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dulling brass

You might try vinegar, or rub the receiver down with a buddy's black powder fouling.....
 

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Heck, just shoot a few rounds of the Holy Black, that's guaranteed to dull any brass finish! Seriously, though, the best would probably to have the top beadblated if ya want to keep the sides shiney. But barring that, the brass will tarnish pretty quick and the glare will be gone. I have had several brass framed pistols and they all have tarnished pretty quickly after handling. Ya might try just rubing your hand down the top pat severa times to get the oils from your skin on it and just let the top tarnish a little. Just keep an eye on it and don't let any serious corrosion appear. :D
 

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If there is any chance you want it to be shiny in the future, do not change the finish! Just let nature take it's course and it will get nice and dull all by it's own self. Mine took just a few weeks. If that's not fast enough, try rubbing it down with your hands when you are sweaty. I know it sounds weird, but you'd be surprised at how fast the oil in your hands will tarnish silver and brass.

just my .03
 

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Try some of the Birchwood Casey Sight Black it sprays on and wipes off just like soot (I would mask the sides and spray only the top)
 

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I took a dirty cleaning patch that had black powder fouling on it and wiped my receiver on my '66 rifle with it. I haven't had any glare problems with it since. You can mix up a little paste using unfired black powder and get the same effect.
 

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Shoot Holy Black in the rifle and slobber some of the first wet patch on the action while cleaning.

Lone
 
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