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Discussion Starter #1
I am looking for a DW revolver (.22 cal, 6" H or HV, blue or stainless) to replace my 1985 model that I sold a few years ago in a fit of stupidity. I have to admit that I have not stayed abreast all the comings and goings of DW, so consider me a newbie, here. My question is this: Should I be looking new, current manufacture DW revolvers as being of the same quality, accuracy and appearance as the older, 1970s and 1980s models?
Or, should I skip looking at new stock and focus my search on an older model?

Any commen, discussion or direction would be greatly appreciated.

Regards,

/Emil
 

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I would put fit and finish of the new Dan Wessons above anything in the past. The accuracy of my current production 722 is better than my old Palmer, Mass manufactured 722. Last silhoutte season, I was trying out new ammo at a match without sight settings and managed to knock over 7x10 turkeys all with leg shots.

In my opinion, the older Monson manufactured revolvers are pretty darn good. I have one in .41 which will shoot lights out and I wouldn't trade it for love or money.

The new models are pricey. I would guess you are looking at about $550.00 for a .22. They are using millet sights on standard models and Bomar sights on the SRS models (Silhouette). If you are interested in top accuracy, be prepared to get a trigger job as I would estimate the single action pull from the factory around 6-7lbs.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Dan Wesson : Then.....

Thnx for the feedback. It's encouraging to hear that "newer" is better than "older", at least in relation to a tried and true design like the DW revolver.

Given the high prices of new DWs and the apparent "bargain" of old models, I settled for an old model SS pistol with a Silhouette barrel. While this wasn't my first choice of barrel length, the price of the DW I purchased was half the cost of a new DW leaving plenty of room to add another barrel when I find one, one of the beauties of owning a DW revolver.

/Emil
 

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My only advice to anyone buying DW's, is make ABSOLUTELY SURE that you're going to be happy with your purchase before paying your money.

I have several DW's that I've had for many years and I intend on keeping them..

Just be forwarned that if you ever decide you don't like the pistol, or you just want to move on to something else, you're going to take a huge hit on the resale value/trade in for your gun.

It's unfortunate, but DW's have about the poorest resale value of any gun that even resembles quality manufacture.


It's a damn shame, but it's a fact we all have to face up too.


I ama "gun show junky" and attend several a month within a couple hundred mile radius of my home. I can assure you I've seen the same Dan Wesson pistols for sale by the same dealers/individuals for a couple years now. And they've got them priced in the cellar.... just no takers.


I wish I had the answer, but I don't.
 

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Gun values

[/color] :gun4: I tend to agree on gun show values. Just as a note; When the 414's came out in 1994 they made us 25 guns before they went belly-up. Very short run. SN started at 0025 went to #53. They skipped 3 numbers in the middle. Two nine inch bls were made sloted on bottom to make weight. I've seen only one of these 41 supermags for sale. If you find one of these guns, I would hold on to it, or contact me, I might consider a trade. By the way I still have the original (Starline) 414E.T. Gates head stamp brass for this gun.
 

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Yes the used guns can't be given away and they are theeeee best made, most accurate, strongest, most innovative etc etc. The 1911's are beating Kimbers for the price and the new DW's are the best ever made
 

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[/color] :gun4: On the old vs the new. I think you always have to remember to pick your guns well. Mic the exit holes, .429-430. Production guns arn't always made to be exact, although they should be. The DW's we sold over the years were good but not always exact. If you know how to check your gun the old shooter can become a tack driver. The throat is very important element of this. The end of your barrel that next to your cylinder has to be flat and gaped right. when the bullet comes out of your cylinder the gas could go more to the side that has a uneveness. The bullet may hit the throat uneven. Thus your accuracy will suffer some. SLUG the barrel. A small chunk of lead pounded down your barrel with a dowell. Mic it to see if your at 429, 429.5,430. Get a mould made for it. Your 44 should shoot well. I'm sure there more tricks to get an accurate wheel gun. combination of loads bullets and the above will get you started and bust rams. I haven't played any of the new guns yet. For a production DW's are hard to beat. SUPERMAG505
 

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So you don't size for the cylinder mouth on these for best accuracy? Or is that one of those old debates that never ends? Just curious, as I'll probably try everything.
 
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