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I've refinished several antique furniture pieces where we used stains, linseed oil, tung oil, lacquer, or polyurethane, depending on the desired results. Now, I'm wondering what to use on my old Browning BAR rifle stocks(1970 mfg). It has a high gloss finish, resembling a high gloss polyurethane, without any amber or yellowing properties. What does Browning currently use or what did they use in the 1970's to protect the stock finish? Were their stocks stained and then sprayed, or just used naturally with a protective spray? Was it polyurethane, or something else to that effect without any ambering properties? I don't think that Tru-oil will give me the high gloss, uniform glass-like appearance that originally came on the stocks. If you have any experience with these particular stocks, please feel free to leave comments. Thanks.
 

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Sir:
My understanding was that Browning used a lacquer until it was replaced with a poly finish. The lacquer ones are easy to spot as they deteriate with age and usually can be flaked off with a fingernail.. The poly finishes as I'm sure you know are a different story.. There are strippers available that will remove them but the strippers are very aggressive.. they are generally marked for use with aircraft paints, which are 2 part epoxy paints of the 'imron'(sp.) ilk... I've never used them as I was afraid of a residue remaining in the wood that may later come back to haunt us as did the salt in the Browning wood.. I refinished stocks for some time for a gunsmithing concern locally and developed a tecknique that uses heat from a propane torch to damage the poly finishes enough to allow them to be easily scraped away with common cabinet scrapers... If you are interested I can elaborate.. Otherwise any remover that's rated for aitcraft paint will work. They can be had at most better paint stores and especially thru auotmotive paint dealers... and be certain to remove/neuturalise any stripper remaining on the stock and try not to put any more water on the wood than is necessary. They stock must also then be allowed to totally dry before refinishing begins... good luck from the gunnut69
 
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