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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This evening I took a walk behind the house to check some cams. Grabbed my peep sighted .32 Spcl M94 Winchester just to have. I put my notebook computer in a small pack to check cards on site; my electronic predator call was in the pack since last I used it. On one cam I have a picture of a black bear from about 8:00am today. I figure, what the heck I'll set up the caller about 100 yards away at the edge of a bog. I call a couple of times using a fawn in distress call, no bear, but I catch movement to my left and see a coyote circling to get downwind. As I turn to shoot it sees me and runs, I let one fly but miss. So this is the first coyote I've called in. I realize I've probably educated it some, so how long do I wait before I try that spot again, and do I use a different call? Thanks,


Lester
 

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I would move my stand location and change the sound I use after waiting for a couple days. Pay attention to the wind and try to stay as still as possible.

:) Al
 

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Will mainly depend on how large of an area he controls - if he's a male and not an alpha, he might just be passing through and you'll never see him again. I would just set up at that same spot or if you have other good spots - just pick one and set up. Fawn distress or coyote pup distress are good calls as are the different rabbit calls. If your remote has good range and at 100 yards that's pretty good, just let him circle, unless he'll be swinging in behind you, as they sometimes will circle tight to get down-wind and you'll get a shot at 20 yards if you are 100 yards up-wind of your caller. I would also use some type of decoy at your speaker. Something resembling rabbit fur (will move just ever so slightly with a skiff of wind) or maybe a couple pheasant tail feathers - something along those lines. You want him to zero in on your decoy, that will usually cause him to circle tighter or to just come straight on in.


They will still notice any movement made by you if they are coming toward you - once you are at 90* or greater to their head, they will pick up movement but you'll see them turn their head after which you just freeze and they'll normally just keep at a fast trot toward your decoy - sometimes they will stop dead for a second or two while looking straight at ya - they seldom will continue on but will break straight away - I will start throwing lead ASAP once they stop.


If they make a big wide sweep, normally they are more curious than hungry, unless they have been hunted hard - but even then, most will cut short if they see just a slight movement from the decoy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Good advice guys, thanks very much. I'll give it a try again soon in the same area, probably not the exact same spot, as there are a few others close by that should offer a good set up. I do have a ruffed grouse wing that I've used before as a decoy, that'll be with me next time I try. In my original post I failed to mention that I did have two scent wicks with red fox urine near my stand...


Lester
 
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