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... and I wish I'd started sooner. Took the recurve out early to start practicing and it was clear my body just wasn't having it. My buddy (recently retired 30yr Army Colonel) has been hunting with a xbow for 15+ years, encouraged me to give it a try, so I picked up an Amped 415 for a ridiculous discount, got some Hammerfist arrows from Hobo Archery, and some NAP Killzones. First shot with target points I got a nearly full pass through on my layered foam target so I had to pick up a high speed rated bag to practice and sight in. Wow is this thing fast!

Been out a bunch with it, just haven't harvested a deer yet. Did take a shot, about 40yds on a meat doe, and held two lines high thinking I needed to compensate for the range ... nope, it shot straight. Passed clean over her shoulders, landed past her in an empty corn field.
 

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Crossbows are impressive. I always hunted with a compound, then about 8 years ago, I injured my shoulder, and couldn't draw it. That was the year PA opened crossbow hunting. Night before I was supposed to go hunting with some friends, one of them suggested a crossbow, so I bought one that night, sighted it in in the dark with headlights for illumination. The next morning, I arrowed a nice fat doe from the top of a ridge, shooting almost straight down. Hit her between the shoulder blades. The bolt severed her spine, exited the lower rib cage, and buried itself in the dirt. I was impressed. Have taken a couple more deer, and a turkey since, and my compound sits gathering dust.

Larry

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Crossbows are impressive. I always hunted with a compound, then about 8 years ago, I injured my shoulder, and couldn't draw it. That was the year PA opened crossbow hunting. Night before I was supposed to go hunting with some friends, one of them suggested a crossbow, so I bought one that night, sighted it in in the dark with headlights for illumination. The next morning, I arrowed a nice fat doe from the top of a ridge, shooting almost straight down. Hit her between the shoulder blades. The bolt severed her spine, exited the lower rib cage, and buried itself in the dirt. I was impressed. Have taken a couple more deer, and a turkey since, and my compound sits gathering dust.

Larry

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Larry, I had that shot on a doe yesterday ... she literally brushed the ladder on my stand as she walked under me - would've been a 5 yard shot nearly straight down. Too little though, let her go to fatten up a bit. But based on how this things shoots through layered foam targets, I was imagining all I'd find of the arrow was a bloody nock sticking out of the ground underneath her.
 

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Hi, everyone! Can you help me to choose new crossbow bolts. I have started archery recently...not really experienced. The thing is I am left-handed, and I am afraid it could be a problem. I've come across this article while choosing.
 

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Hi, everyone! Can you help me to choose new crossbow bolts. I have started archery recently...not really experienced. The thing is I am left-handed, and I am afraid it could be a problem. I've come across this article while choosing.
StannyLu, just want to make sure you're asking asking about Crossbow (horizontal, ambidextrous), and not Compound (vertical) bows? The article you linked was about Compound bows. Arrows are different depending on which type of bow you're asking about.

For my Crossbow, the Bloodsport Witness has been the most consistent performer for the value. A batch of 6 all weighed precisely the same: 303.3 grn. Same FOC. With similarly matched-weight 125 gr field points, they all hit the same point on the target. Crossbows usually have a recommended arrow length and weight - going a little heavier will often make it fire smoother, quieter, and is easier on the limbs and will prolong their life. Crossbows are so fast now that the combination between a faster bow and a heavier arrow makes for a powerful result on game, like complete pass through at 50-60yds!
 

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StannyLu - Most cross bow bolts are usually 20 or 22 inches long. Different cross bow types use different types of nocks. Flat or half moon type are the most common. I would contact your cross bows manufacturer, or Google your particular bow, and see what length, weight, and nock is recommended.

Bolts are commonly available in aluminum or carbon fiber. Both seem about equally durable; aluminum bends, and CF breaks / shatters when you hit something hard. I like aluminum because I can re-straighten bent bolts good enough to use for practice, or as an unloading bolt, fired into the dirt. I use Easton and Carbon Express bolts in my rig.

I like NAP expandable broadheads for hunting, as they fly true out of my bow. Remember cross bows have a lot of energy, and any inconsistency in you bolts or tips will be magnified compared to a slower bow and arrow. I like plastic vanes compared to feather - more durable. You can also get illuminated nocks, which work great in low light - like a tracer bullet to your target. You will also want a rope cocker, as cocking a cross bow by hand is difficult, and is usually less accurate, as it is not as consistent as cocking mechanically.

Larry
 
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