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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Nope!

This guy is in New York. As I have about 5 bows in the house, I needed some help last year. He made 6 for me and I'm telling you, they are the best I've ever put on my bows. :grin:

As a matter of fact, he's making 2 for my wifes bow right now. I teach for a computer company and hardly have time to shoot these days, much less make any strings.

Anyway, I saw his post in the classifieds and thought of you guys.
 

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The ad is no longer there. He is a manufacturer of bow strings and sells them as a business. Businesses must pay to advertise and he wasn't interested in paying even the minimum $50 fee to do so. I removed his ad.

Individuals can sell their personal goods excess to their current needs for free but businesses must pay to advertise and sell on this site.

GB
 

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I love flem strings as well and make them for all my bows. If your bow can handle fast flight, then try making one out of 450 plus material. Each thread has a 155# break strength, and the material has zero stretch - yes truely zero unlike fastflight. This material will allow you to make a much thinner string ( less threads) that will not creep at all. I use 8 threads for my 50 to 60# longbows and that gives me a break strength of over 1200#!!! I could easily go less threads, but then the knocks are too loose lol.
One draw back to this material is that unless you have a good glove, it bites into the fingers badly due to no stretch.
 

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Try one and see if you do get a bow capable of ff. 450 plus is about as much better than fastflight as fastflight is above dacron. I agree that at hunting ranges -especially 10 yards lol) it will make no difference, but I like to shoot all year and practice out to 60 yards. The speed and decrease in noise are noticed, but the real advantage is tougher material( longer life of string as well as better abraision or cutting resistance)in the hunting environment. You really will not have a fear of cutting the string with a broadhead unless you really lay into it and bruch will not fray the newer materials.

Also, the lack of stretch eliminates the need to retune as often - especially when compaired to dacron which will continue to stretch and stretch. This is not as great an issue if a bow is true centershot as it is for us longbow shooters.

I think that on a older( most likely slower) bow, the difference is not as noticed, but on newer, faster, lower brace height, reflex/deflex bows speed will be noticed. Also, on the lower brace height bows, you will not run the risk of hitting yourhand/wrist juncture with no stretch strings as can happen with dacron ( I do not mean the wrist where arm guard covers). I know that if I put a dacron string on either of my two reflex/deflex longbows (6 1/2" brace heights), I have had the string hit the spot where my thumb meets my wrist.

In any case, regardless of the string material, flem strings are both more traditional and just plain look nicer and are easy to make. You can get plans for a jig on the internet and you probably have spare wood in the garage to make it out of. The version of archers bible that I have walks you through making a string (all it really is is braiding) as does my copy of traditional archery. It will also save you a ton of money as bow string bulk material is cheap and you can make one of much higher quality than the cheap strings sold in many stores. For me, making equipment is always much more fun than buying it - there is nothing like taking an animal with a arrow that you made knocked to a string you twisted, and shot from a bow that you made. Makes me want to get into smithing now so that I can learn to make broadheads, but my wife would most likely slay me with my own bow if I started one more hobby hehe.

Good luck this season.
 
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