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Discussion Starter #1
I read today that I can adjust the trigger pull on my 629 by removing the grips and turning a screw! Now THERE'S a feature I'd like to have on ALL my guns!
 

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Dusty,

This is main leaf spring that you are loosening. It will lesson the d/a pull and reduce the power in which the firing pin hits the primer.

S/W does not consider this a trigger adjustment and says that this screw should be turned in all the way. You can seriously reduce the reliability of your gun. Some people do this, but I caution you that the screw will not stay put once it is loose and can loosen further by itself.

Incidently all K, L, and N frame S/W have this "feature"

Fred
 

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HappyHunter said:
Dusty,

This is main leaf spring that you are loosening. It will lesson the d/a pull and reduce the power in which the firing pin hits the primer.

S/W does not consider this a trigger adjustment and says that this screw should be turned in all the way. You can seriously reduce the reliability of your gun. Some people do this, but I caution you that the screw will not stay put once it is loose and can loosen further by itself.

Incidently all K, L, and N frame S/W have this "feature"

Fred

HappyHunter, you are correct. I loosened mine and it back almost all the way out. That is not a trigger adjustment that needs to be messed with.
 

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Well doggone, that "feature" doesen't appear to be all the attractive after all. I wonder if I lightened the trigger to 4 lb and then put some Loctite on the screw if it'd stay put.
 

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It would help...some people after they are sure that the gun will fire reliably with the screw out a certain amount will cut down the screw. This allows the shoulder of screw to be snugged down and there is no problem with it loosening.

Be darn certain that the primer will ignite before you go shortening this screw.

Now another problem. The trigger rebound spring is in a give and take relationship with this main leaf spring. If you change one you may need to alter or replace the other. The rebound spring is 17 coils and is sometimes shortened to 16 or 15 coils in trigger jobs. It can also be replaced by a lighter spring.

Wolff gun spring company offers a spring kit for your gun that has a reduced power main leaf spring and 3 different reduced power rebound springs. This may be a better way to go as you will have your original parts unaltered to go back if you wish to.

hth

Fred
 

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The best thing to do is have a good gun smith do the job, or send it to S&W. JMHO
 

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I replaced the rebound spring on my S&W’s with 12# and 13# one’s. This reduces the double action pounds. I also replaced the Power Rib Mainspring on one of my guns, but the jury is still out on it. One of the problems that some have run into with this spring is misfires. I have not done enough testing as of yet. I used Wolff Springs (gunsprings.com).

I would not trim springs or back out screws, if your going to do this, then do it right or don’t do it at all.
 

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Even with a good action job I still prefer a heavy rebound spring. To me, with an action job, I’m shooting for smoothness and not for a really light pull. The problem with a too light rebound spring is that you will short stroke the trigger and the DA sear will not engage. Your cylinder will rotate to the next round but the hammer will never draw back and fall.

Take Care,
Scott
 

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:cb2: Last Summer I was shooting my 3" M66 and had no problem with .38s, but half my .357s wouldn't fire. Dimpled primers, but no bang. Sometimes not one out of the six would fire. I didn't know if it was the gun or the cheap ammo, so I took the gun and the ammo to my gunsmith. He found the leaf spring screw had worked its way loose. It was striking the .38 primers hard enough to fire, but not the .357 primers. This is one of my main carry guns. No problem now, but I'm glad I found out the problem while shooting for fun, and not for need.

Bottom line—get a real trigger job if you need one. Don't mess with this screw.
 
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