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Discussion Starter #1
What is required to launch the special grenades with the M-1? I don't want the real grenades, but think I would like to play around with the practice grenades. All I have seen are pictures, but don't know anything about what all is required. Do the grenades fit over the muzzle or is there an attachment that fits over the muzzle that the grenade fits on or what? I understand there is a special grenade sight for it--am I correct? And is it a blank cartridge that launches the grenade? Is all the equipment including cartridges and practice grenades available for purchase? If so, where at at what price? Does anyone make a crimper so you can reload the cartridges to launch the practice grenades?
 

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M1 Garand grenade launcher

The original grenade launcher for the M1 rifle consisted of a snap-on muzzle device that attached to the bayonet lug, with a tube spout that provides a slip-fit for the tailboom of the grenade. The gas mechanism of the rifle was disabled for grenade launching, since it was strictly a single-shot affair. Grenade launching cartridges were single-loaded, not clip-fed.

The sight was made compatible with rifle grenades also used on the the Springfield 1903 rifle launcher and the M1 Carbine. The sight device was a pressed-steel accessory that attached to the left sife of the stock near the clip release with wood screws. It's rather crude, and designed only for a couple hundred yards range. This system was used throughout WWII and Korea until replaced by the more effective M14 rifle grenade launcher and the M79 launchers in the late 1950's.

The grenades were launched using special GRENADE LAUNCHING blanks, not the regular noise-and-flash training blanks.

It's probably NOT a good idea to try to make your own grenade launching blanks, because even the military with it's extensive experience in using blank ammo for training has experienced damaged rifles (and shooters) using blank ammunition.

Many of these items are still widely available in army surplus stores and military surplus dealers. Check the Shotgun News ads.

Please be advised that some states recently enacted legislation that made possession of the launcher/rifle combination an "assault weapon" with the related ownership problems. Possession of real explosive grenades of course is prohibited. WWII reenactors like these rigs because it was common for one designated rifleman in an infantry squad to be the grenadier.
 

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What you are looking for are the M7 and M7A1 grenade launching attachments for the M1 rifle.The earlier M7 did not allow the M1 rifle to cycle semi-automatically and the M7A1 came out late in the war to correct this.

Yes,dogfaces in WWII prefered to have a rifle dedicated to grenade lauching,normally it was the M1903A3.The 1903 series bolt gun was a much better grenade lauching platform.The rifle grenades were hard on the M1 rifles gas sytem and bent operating rods were common.Rifle grenades generated some wicked recoil and normally they would not be fired from the shoulder.

Grenade launching blanks generated higher recoil than normal "training blanks.They were loaded with EC blank powder,the same stuff used to load MKII "pineapple" grenades;the military switched grenade filler from TNT to EC powder right before US involvement in WWII(yellow bodies denoted TNT,OD with yellow ring EC).


CH4D makes star crimp blank dies to make training blanks.Blank making is more of an advanced handloading operation.DO NOT try and make grenade launching spec blanks,DO NOT shoot grenade blanks through your M1 rifle,its really hard on these aging war horses.

http://www.rt66.com/~korteng/SmallArms/grndrifl.htm
http://www.finnaa.com/m7page.html
http://www.ch4d.com/
 

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**** of a recoil ,even as a young man about three is all you could fire without flinching there after and you always were bruised.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I thought it might be fun to "launch" some of the practice grenades, but after finding out about the recoil and possible damage to the rifle, don't think I'll be doing it. I am very proud of my DCM M-1 and have not changed a thing about it--I want to keep it just as it came from the armory. I shoot it with GI ammo and want to keep it shooting just as it did during WWII. Sooooo, think I'll pass on the grenade launcher. Thanks for the info. You have kept me from probably damaging a rifle I am very proud of, especially its historical significance.
 
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