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I looked at the first few pages. But it's hand written (scribbled) and I could not read it, I'm not sure if it's even English.

Maybe someone else will have better luck.

ETA: I scrolled through several more pages and found some crude illustrations, but they're about as indecipherable as the handwriting.
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On a desk top, if you open up the chape where the book appears, that opens it. Navigation bar across the top of the page has left/right arrows to turn pages, and you can scroll in and out to enlarge. When clicking on the right arrow for the next page, it will open in a small full page view and you can scroll into details.

Looks like a serious study on artillery, but it is almost unusable without many hours of specialized effort. It is written in a very archaic script which is hard to decipher. Then, if you can read it, the English language (grammar and spelling) are more nearly that of Chaucer's Centerbury Tales or Shakespeare that what we are used to today. 18th Century English is pretty much recognizable, but this is so much earlier that it really needs a specialized scholar to even make a transcript, let alone a translation.

Still, a very important historical document. Someone may have already translated or copied much of it in a later (18th century?) text.
 

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John.

I opened the link. Then scrolled down to the section the says View Bindings.

I nclicked on the thing that looks like a book. That opened another window showing the book.

I use a roller wheel mouse.

Clicking on the book made the page large.

Using the roller allowed me to make the page larger and smaller.

Holding the left click button allowed me to move the page right-left, up-down.

Top right of the window at triangles that turn the page. Just a triangle turns the page in direction triangle points. Triangle with a bar goes to the end of the book in the direction of the triangle.
 

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ABEbooks has a copy of a 1969 reprint for under $50, if anyone wants a hard copy.

The author, William Bourne was not primarily a "gun guy" but quite an interesting character. Sort of a British Leonardo DeVinci. Here is the opening section of the Wikipedia entry on him:
QUOTE
"William Bourne (c. 1535–1582) was an English mathematician, innkeeper and former Royal Navy gunner who presented the first design for a navigable submarine and wrote important navigational manuals. He is often called William Bourne of Gravesend.
In 1574, he produced a popular version of the Martín Cortés de Albacar's Arte de Navegar, entitled A Regiment for the Sea. Bourne was critical of some aspects of the original and produced a manual of more practical use to the seaman. He described how to make observations of the sun and stars, using a cross-staff, and how to plot coastal features from the ship by taking bearings using triangulation."
END QUOTE
 
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