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I agree with victorcharlie the Garmin Legend is a good deal. It has a good basemap for general travel. Plus you can load up to 8MB of mapping software. It only stores maps from Garmin's MapSource products.

It's downside is that reception in heavy oak or bigger timber is limited. You need to find daylight. I use a combination gps and handheld compass at times.

The Legend package comes with a pc cable. You can upload and download waypoints and tracks from other map vendors. You just cannot load their maps on a Garmin product. Unless you spend the big bucks for a Garmin PDA/Gps. Many times I have had my Legend setting in a dashboard cupholder, connected to my laptop using Garmin Software or Microsoft Streets & Trips displaying my location. I let my passenger do the navigating, and I do the driving.

The price at the gps store is to high. There is one or more Internet Vendors that are selling it for $149.00. I have also seen it advertised for $149.00 in the newspaper as a sale item.

I must admit that I do not always understand gps units and reception. The other morning I took off on a hike into a location for which I had installed the Lat/Long on my two gps units as waypoints. The path I took is tightly surrounded with Oak canopy and tall conifers. Within fifty feet the Legend lost its satellite lock. The 76C lost a couple of satellites but maintained a lock on 3 or 4 depending on the location on the path. Once I left the path, the heavy cover(jungle) blocked all reception on both units. When I broke out of the cover and obtained some sky reception came back. The kicker was the Legend had better reception then the 76C.

In semi open areas, and travelling the Interstate they have the same reception. When I am in those areas I am not at a disadvantage with the Legend when it comes to reception. There are other features which makes the price of the 76C worth it.

I have not used Lowrance gps units. I would check other sources for price. Reading the specs on the unit you are getting a lot of gps for the dollar. Some advantages are the ability to load a lot of mapping information on to the MMC cards. An external antenna outlet if you need that down the road.

Lowrance processors are noted for their speed.

A big disadvantage of the Lowrance Basic it is not WATERPROOF. :( It comes with a water proof case. Newer model Lowrance units are waterproof. The price makes me wonder if Lowrance is phasing out this older model because of the lack of waterproofing?

The price at the gpstore is about $30 LESS then what I recently seen at a local outdoor store for the iFinder Basic. :)
 

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There are a couple of cheaper options for in vehicle use with a laptop. Microsoft is selling their Streets & Trips packaged with a gps receiver. The receiver has a magnetic based for the roof of your pickup. You will need your new notebook to plug it into.

Or DeLorme also sells a gps receiver/software package. Another one to plug into a notebook computer.

I have seen them on sale between $80 to $100 plus at the big box stores. I have no idea what they are going for on the internet.

A friend who hauls crews around the country uses the DeLorme.

victorcharlie: Maybe it was not a good satellite day.
 

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JoeG52 and your followup post have turned on the light. Get an Auto Club Map or get travel directions and maps off the internet. You are not going to a remote location. You are headed to a city next to Denver, CO. A paper map will do the job. I have travelled all over the country for years and did not need a gps. I have received phone calls in the middle of the night with an assignment hundreds of miles away and I made it there, and back.

A gps would have been nice, even a non-routing one would have been helpful. It would have been nice to been able to plug Denver or some other location in as a waypoint. Or having reached a distance location and given the name of a very small town to go to. It was neat to be able to put the name of a very small town in Montana in my Legend and find it. Make it a waypoint, and do a goto. I could not find it on my paper map. The gps gives me comfort at times at 2 a.m. on a remote highway. A feeling that I know where I am.

So a gps falls into the nice to have, not must have category. I like nice to have things.

I like your schooling plans. I thought long and hard about going to Oregon Technical institute School of gunsmithing back in the 60's. During those years OTI and CST were the schools to go to for gunsmithing classes. I do not know if OTI still has a program. Lassen Community College in NE California has a program. But CST has been at the head of the class.

Even with two gps units I will still print out a map from Map Quast or Yahoo for a multi-state trip. I believe the Lowrance will and I know the Legends base map program will give you accommodations at each freeway exit. It's nice to know when travelling at night where you can get fuel, and eat. Many small towns do not have a gas pump. There are some areas along rural highways that fill-ups can be more then 100 miles away. I travel on the top half of the tank.

The gps would have been great when looking for small airstrips in remote areas. At times these small airstrips will have a different name then the town they are associated with. And maybe a few miles out of town. I have found the gps to be helpful. The POI(points of interest) option in a gps unit can be helpful.

Anyway what ever option, I hope you plans are fulfilled.
 

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JoeG52 and your followup post have turned on the light. Get an Auto Club Map or get travel directions and maps off the internet. You are not going to a remote location. You are headed to a city next to Denver, CO. A paper map will do the job. I have travelled all over the country for years and did not need a gps. I have received phone calls in the middle of the night with an assignment hundreds of miles away and I made it there, and back.

A gps would have been nice, even a non-routing one would have been helpful. It would have been nice to been able to plug Denver or some other location in as a waypoint. Or having reached a distance location and given the name of a very small town to go to. It was neat to be able to put the name of a very small town in Montana in my Legend and find it. Make it a waypoint, and do a goto. I could not find it on my paper map. The gps gives me comfort at times at 2 a.m. on a remote highway. A feeling that I know where I am.

So a gps falls into the nice to have, not must have category. I like nice to have things.

I like your schooling plans. I thought long and hard about going to Oregon Technical institute School of gunsmithing back in the 60's. During those years OTI and CST were the schools to go to for gunsmithing classes. I do not know if OTI still has a program. Lassen Community College in NE California has a program. But CST has been at the head of the class.

Even with two gps units I will still print out a map from Map Quast or Yahoo for a multi-state trip. I believe the Lowrance will and I know the Legends base map program will give you accommodations at each freeway exit. It's nice to know when travelling at night where you can get fuel, and eat. Many small towns do not have a gas pump. There are some areas along rural highways that fill-ups can be more then 100 miles away. I travel on the top half of the tank.

The gps would have been great when looking for small airstrips in remote areas. At times these small airstrips will have a different name then the town they are associated with. And maybe a few miles out of town. I have found the gps to be helpful. The POI(points of interest) option in a gps unit can be helpful.

Anyway what ever option, I hope you plans are fulfilled.
 

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3,539 Posts
JoeG52 and your followup post have turned on the light. Get an Auto Club Map or get travel directions and maps off the internet. You are not going to a remote location. You are headed to a city next to Denver, CO. A paper map will do the job. I have travelled all over the country for years and did not need a gps. I have received phone calls in the middle of the night with an assignment hundreds of miles away and I made it there, and back.

A gps would have been nice, even a non-routing one would have been helpful. It would have been nice to been able to plug Denver or some other location in as a waypoint. Or having reached a distance location and given the name of a very small town to go to. It was neat to be able to put the name of a very small town in Montana in my Legend and find it. Make it a waypoint, and do a goto. I could not find it on my paper map. The gps gives me comfort at times at 2 a.m. on a remote highway. A feeling that I know where I am.

So a gps falls into the nice to have, not must have category. I like nice to have things.

I like your schooling plans. I thought long and hard about going to Oregon Technical institute School of gunsmithing back in the 60's. During those years OTI and CST were the schools to go to for gunsmithing classes. I do not know if OTI still has a program. Lassen Community College in NE California has a program. But CST has been at the head of the class.

Even with two gps units I will still print out a map from Map Quast or Yahoo for a multi-state trip. I believe the Lowrance will and I know the Legends base map program will give you accommodations at each freeway exit. It's nice to know when travelling at night where you can get fuel, and eat. Many small towns do not have a gas pump. There are some areas along rural highways that fill-ups can be more then 100 miles away. I travel on the top half of the tank.

The gps would have been great when looking for small airstrips in remote areas. At times these small airstrips will have a different name then the town they are associated with. And maybe a few miles out of town. I have found the gps to be helpful. The POI(points of interest) option in a gps unit can be helpful.

Anyway what ever option, I hope you plans are fulfilled.
 

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We sure would like to hear your experience with the Basic Ifinder. I have found limited amounts of information regarding their performance. I believe that readers are looking for information from start up to application.

so keep us up todate.
 
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