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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know this is stretching things a bit. But still relates to the FA forum as members have discussed holsters etc here. I'll get to the point. I need a safe for my growing collection and now with the single shot FA and short barreled gun I am running out of space. Only problem is that I need a "light weight" safe. Under 300 lbs max. less is better. I can live with a "pistol safe" as I have no long guns as of yet. Would prefer an American made safe, although I know in this weight class it will probably come by way of China. Fire resistance is of no concern to me. Just protection against a "light strike" attempt at safe entry by a crumbbun. Thanks.
-Don
 

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I agree with the weight thing. I've moved a 600 lb safe a few times and it is a PAIN! 300lbs would be easier to deal with. If you don't need a fire safe, you might look at this. You can break it down and make it manageable to move.

http://www.zanottiarmor.com/safes.htm

However, I've somewhat lost my faith in safes as far as protecting guns from theft. I think they can keep your kids from getting into your guns. But, I’m doubtful about them protecting a “real” criminal from getting them. The reason for me stating this is one of my friends on the east coast of Michigan had his guns stolen.

He had a very heavy safe that was of a top name brand that is made in America. It had all the fancy keep the safe crackers out of it doo dads. It was anchored to the wall and floor. Someone hooked a cable/chain or something up to it and pulled it out of the floor/wall and through the outside wall of his house between when he left for work and got back at lunch time. Within a month his Kimber 45 was picked up by a cop in a traffic stop. The rest of his guns have not shown up. So, not only did he loose all of his guns that were stored in one convenient 1000lb + “transportation” case. He also had a hole in his floor and hole in his house. Probably a total of over $20,000 loss including guns, house damage, safe, etc.
Long story short, a light safe makes since. But, it is mostly an illusion of security from theft. It will keep out the amateurs and kids. That is about it.
 

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just my 2 cents,

In my opinion, what we all call "Safes" are actually theft deterrents. They offer a certain level of security (both from fire and from theft). In most cases the level of security is proportional to the cost. I believe MY safe offers me adequate protection from fire and from the "smash and grab" robbery.

Given some simple tools and the right amount of time, i have no doubt that a determined person could gain entry to just about anything.......Including my safe. The experience that rocky_taco shared is a prime example of a determined thief. However, I doubt it is the norm that a thief will have that kind of time, no neighbors around to see it happening, and have the safe on an exterior wall allowing the needed space to gain access with whatever machinery/vehicle is needed to yank a safe through a wall. Somebody came to that house with a certain level of knowledge of the situation they were entering AND with the tools needed to pull it off. And in addition to that, the thief also had the equipment/manpower to load it onto a trailer, van, or truck.

Honestly, If a safe isn't bolted down, a simple refrigerator/furniture dolley (one of those with the leg that drops down) and two men could tote off a ~850 lb safe with relative ease.

~c.r.
 

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I'm going to wander a bit from the actual question, but still throw out an idea. About 10 years ago I built my retirement home. During the design phase, I planned an underground "safe room", to do double duty as a vault and a storm shelter. It's 7x11 feet, and dug into solid bedrock on three sides. (The lot is sloped, so this was easy.) Each wall and roof are 8" of concrete with extra steel rebar reinforcement. It has full HVAC, as well as an outside air vent via a 4" pipe. The door consists of a prehung vault door, about 1/2 inch thick, with a combo lock. From the inside, the lock can be manually released. I average about 2 to 4 uses a year for tornado warnings, and the rest of the time it just houses guns, photographs, computer backup files, ammo, documents, etc. It's pretty easy to design something like this into a plan, but harder to retrofit.

Otherwise, I'd try to combine a safe with some sort of concealment. A false wall at the back of a closet is good, or maybe hiding a safe between wall studs and sheetrock walls of adjoining rooms. Another trick is to hide rifle bolts and revolver cylinders separate from the rest of the guns. At least a thief won't get a shootable gun. Gun safes do get defeated sometimes, but overall, they have a pretty good record compared to no safe at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks to all that have replied with your suggestions. I've been real sick with a cold/flu and feel really punk. Poor me lol! I purchased a couple of small gun "lockers" modular in design. Not fire resistant but theft and certainly child resistant. Weigh about 10 lbs each unit. I agree a big safe sticking out there in the living room might be inviting a burglary. Out of sight. Out of mind as they say. I have strategically located various high end Apple products (mac book pro, iPod classic 160 gb, etc.) in the middle of the room in front of the pistol lockers. My logic is that the thief will immediately head for said Apple products triggering the trap door that ejects aforementioned criminal into a water slide that terminates into a muddy pool of large hungry beavers. Should work?
 
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