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This is the religious discussion forum, are you of the opinion that Halloween is a Christian religious event?
 

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i get more "flipped out" over the neighborhood
border jumpers practicing their voodoo and
central american and santa ria crap in their yards
 

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mcbammer said:
Pagan rituals is nothing new in the churches , look at how many celebrate Easter . The goddess of fertility .
??? The Churches and Christians I'm familiar with, celebrate the resurrection of Christ.

Please elaborate on that please.
 

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Oldshooter said:
mcbammer said:
Pagan rituals is nothing new in the churches , look at how many celebrate Easter . The goddess of fertility .
??? The Churches and Christians I'm familiar with, celebrate the resurrection of Christ.

Please elaborate on that please.
Easter is only found once in the Bible in Acts 12.4 it is a mis- translation. of the Greek word Pascha translated means Passover , Greek dictionary word 3957 in your Strongs Concordance . Research Istar a pagan goddess worshipped and practiced in the spring around the same time as Passover . It worked its way into Christianity down thru the Centuries . Christ became the Passover lamb the sacrifice for one and all times . Hiding colored boiled eggs is not found in the Bible . Church s do some abominable things in order to keep their attendance up .
 

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Some Christian employees complained to HR at a company where I worked. They did not like anything on the premises that alluded to Halloween since it was pagan in origin and was offensive to Christians. i doubt that there were any pagans there but most of the Christians planned on taking their kids out for trick or treating.
 

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I'm no fan of Catholicism but I know the Roman Church put resurrection observances on Easter as a matter of practicality, not a desire to elevate worship of Istar, so I'm puzzled about attempts to connect Christian Resurrection Day/Easter as a pagan observance. Mention Istar to people today and you would get blank looks because most would have no idea of who or what you were talking about; we don't have people making 'Happy Istar Day!' greeting cards!


I rarely hear a Christian making an issue of Easter or Christmas being pagan at one time. I've NEVER heard anyone try to make Halloween a religious thing but I have heard some concerned about the potential long term spiritual effects on kids. I've basically told them to get real, no little kid is going to become a witch or vampire from dressing in funny outfits and collecting gift candy door to door.
 

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Ireload2 said:
How many of you flip out over the pagan origins of Halloween?
Why 'flip out'? Tie whatever you want to any calendar event, its whats in your Heart that has meaning. There is a need to research history and see where these events actually come from. Here is one explanation....




What is All Hallows Eve Traditions?


Halloween Traditions, History, and Autumn Celebrations


Many Christians know All Hallows Eve by the secular name "Halloween," and avoid any celebration or religious observance of the day. The prevailing thought within many churches is that the holiday glorifies evil and is anti-Christian in its ideology. While many of the customs and traditions associated with the celebration find their roots in Medieval superstitions and ancient European rituals, the prevailing theme of the holiday was to give thanks for the harvest and honor family and friends who died in the past year.


The Church recognized this facet of the observance as they expanded their missionaries into Northern Europe and Britain. Seizing an opportunity to advance the cause of Christ, the Church incorporated Christian ideology into the various harvest festivals throughout Europe and changed the day of honoring saints and martyrs to correspond with the celebrations of the autumn months.


Halloween's Ecclesiastical History
Traditionally, All Hallows Eve is a vigil for the observance of All Saints Day and All Souls Day, which fall respectively on the first two days of November. The name itself means "holy evening". The night is marked within the Church with prayers, hymns, fasting, and the reading of various scriptures in preparation for the celebration of the faith of the saints and martyrs the following day.


All Hallows Eve falls on the 31st of October, which also happens to be the day for the Protestant celebration of the Reformation. Pope Gregory IV set the date for All Saints Day in the early ninth century to specifically interact with the Celtic festival Of Samhain. The prevailing belief within the Church Catechism was that "a perennial link of charity exists between the faithful who have already reached their heavenly home, those who are expiating their sins in purgatory and those who are still pilgrims on earth. Between them there is, too, an abundant exchange of all good things," (#1475).


All Hallows Eve and Autumn Celebrations
Despite the Church's success in establishing a Christian foundation for the autumn celebrations, many of the ancient customs and traditions associated with them were still practiced by the population. The carving of gourds and the wearing of costumes and masks to scare away malevolent spirits are typical of the superstitions carried over from these celebrations into the All Hallows Eve observance.


The custom of "trick-or-treating" has its origins in a ritual wherein the elders of a village or town would go from house to house and receive offerings of food and gifts for the souls of dead friends and relatives thought to visit on this night. This practice evolved during the Middle Ages, when beggars would travel from village to village and beg for "soul cakes". Villagers would offer prayers along with the cakes to those who had died in the past year for their transition to heaven.


Many countries around the world have some type of celebration during the Autumn Equinox that gives thanks for the harvest and pays tribute to those who have died. The concept of death among various cultures and societies, many of them Christian, is treated as a natural part of the process of life. Honoring relatives and friends who have "gone home to be with the Lord" is often viewed as a privilege that is pleasing to God. Numerous Christians find comfort in the belief that those who have gone before them are among the "cloud of witnesses" praying and interceding for them. The United States is one of the few nations in which the concept of death is socially uncomfortable and viewed as a taboo subject.


Whatever the prevailing view amongst churches, for many Christians, Catholic and Protestant, All Hallows Eve continues to be observed as a time of faith and hope. Remembering those who lived their Christian faith and served God with all their hearts, even to the point of giving their lives, provides inspiration and perseverance for those who still remain.


http://www.sharefaith.com/guide/Christian-Holidays/all_hallows_eve.html
 

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Went trick or treating as a kid.
Raised in a Christian family.
Celebrated Christ's resurrection and called it Easter.
No recollection of pagan rituals, thoughts or unctions.
Is it possible that I've been a pagan all along and just didn't realize it?


lc


PS. Stupidity and lack of reason "Flip me out".
These names....eh. No concern.
 

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well this issue can be locked away
for another 365. had a grand total
of 2 kids. about dusk there was a
dust up 2 houses to the east with
about a dozen asst. fire trucks, ems,
and police units. after such an event
it's always fairly serene for the next
6- 10 hours. something about the
poleece in force makes the animals
very quiet.
 

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We had trunk or treat at the Church tonight! There were a hundred little pirates, princesses, batmen, supermen and ninja turtles etc etc walking with bags and little plastic buckets getting treats from the " venders".

I could show you some pics that would melt your heart. All those little pagans were smiling and happy cept for a few timid lil ones. When my 3 year old grandson saw something scary he would jump in my lap and hold his hands over his ears, not the eyes, he wanted to be able to keep an eye on that scary wolf man. ;)
 
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