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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a marlin 30AS with a very heavy trigger pull. I would like to know how to fix it. If it takes new parts, what parts need replaced?
 

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Lendar,
A good gunsmith can do a trigger job. Problem is finding a good gunsmith that is capable and willing to work on the Marlin trigger/sear combination. If you can't find a smith, you can buy and install the Wild West Happy Trigger kit - No Kidding its called the Happy Trigger,
You can buy it from Wild West Guns on line or from Midway or Brownells or any number of gun supply shops.
Cost varies from 60 to 90 bucks and is very easy to install. I installed one on my Marlin 30-30 in 20 minute. I could do the next one in 10.

Bob A
 

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Actually the Marlin design is one of the easiest triggers to improve that I've encountered. You can use a Dremel rotary tool and a cotton cloth polishing drum with some polishing paste and do wonders. You won't remove any metal this way, not much chance of creating a dangerous situation or ruining parts. Simply polish the contact points of the sear and hammer until they are smooth. DO NOT USE SANDING DRUM OR RUBBER CRATEX for this operation as these are far to aggressive and can ruin your hammer and sear and create a dangerous trigger by removing too much steel!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I did just what your talking about and it helped some but its still very heavy. I need to take it apart again and have a look. This is about the worst trigger I have had on a firearm. I thought that maybe this was common on marlin and someone had an easy fix.
 

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I stripped mine when I got it and de-burred all the internals. I polished the trigger surfaces and did remove some material from the sear. If you are new to trigger jobs I don' recommend you doing this yourself. The most important thing is that you don't change any of the angles of parts unless you know what you are doing. In my case the sear was binding because it was to long. I removed a little, tried it, removed a little, tried it, etc. until I got it right. Then I case hardened it to make sure it wouldn't wear. I went from 3 inch groups at 100 yards to 1/2 inch groups.

If you aren't familiar with triggers find a good smith who is, or get one of the drop in kits. Either way before loading the gun cock the hammer and try to make it misfire. I give the stock a good hit with a soft hammer on the butt, bounce it around plenty, slap it hard with my hand on the side etc. If the sear releases I buy new parts and start over. Accidental misfires are not an option.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I think I will do that, but first buy a new sear and then play with the old one. I don't mind polishing things up inside but taking metal off, I never did that before. I would like to have a sear that works before I take metal off the old sear, and there is always a chance a new sear might just fix everything. Thanks for all the replies.
 
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