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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm loading for a Ruger Blackhawk with a 5 1/2" barrel. I have the sites set to shoot point of aim at 40 yards with 200 gr cast in 45acp. My 300 gr colt loads shoot about 3" high at that distance. I'm looking for a couple of things and I know someone here can help. Do you have any load data that approximates black powder velocities with heavy bullets? And, I'm looking for good hunting loads so what's your favorite? I've got molds in 200 and 300 gr but I'm thinking I need something in between (250 or 270). I'm on the fence about going heavier than 300 gr. I just dont think I need it for deer and hogs. When i finally get my bear hunt that may change. Thanks in advance.
 

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You really don't need more than 250 grains for deer or hogs unless you are primarily hunting some really big ones over 250 pounds. I mostly load the Speer 250 swaged lead bullet, the 250 Keith or the 270 RCBS lengthened version of the Keith.

Since I picked up my 5.5" SS Black Hawk convertible I've only shot .45acp thru it so far. I had 1000+ of them loaded up a bit too short to work thru my semiautos. I thought about whether to toss them, pull them and reload or buy a revolver to shoot them in. So I picked up the Ruger BH.

I don't have the loads for either of those bullets in my head but I mostly use Unique and 2400 for them. I haven't been running them over my Chrono but according to the loading manuals I use I should be getting roughly 1000 fps with them. That's a little more than old BP load velocity but not by a lot.

If you can't do it with a 250-270 grain bullet at 1000 fps then you really need a whole lot more gun. If deer and hogs are what you are after you don't need more.
 

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Do a search for Dec/Jan, 2012 Handloader magazine. As Graybeard said, standard loads with a cast Keith or Lee RNFP at 255 grains is plenty enough at pistol range and it’s hard to beat Unique. For Carbine loads, I spice it up with H110 and a 300 grain bullet for good loads. Never had consistent loads with a 255 grain bullet and H110. Also, I’ve used either of the 4227’s with excellent results using a 255 or 300 grainer. Why am I using H110? I have 6 lbs of surplus and am too cheap to give it away
 

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H110/W296 (same powder) is good if ya want loads that hot. In a Ruger which is strong enough to take max loads with it, the powder works well with appropriate bullets but gives more recoil than I personal have a need for these days. My old arthritic hands don't like that much recoil anymore.

These days I tend to shoot for around 959-1000 fps for both the .45 Colt and .44 Special and haven't loaded any .44 magnum in several years tho I have more magnum ammo loaded than I'm likely to ever shoot up.
 

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Same here. I save the hot stuff for the carbine. There’s not much that walks, crawls, creeps, or flies that a standard load won’t take care of with authority
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I appreciate the responses. I've been reading back thru all of the pages and there's a lot of good info on SA's and the 45. I'll keep digging but if anyone else has some nuggets of wisdom, please feel free to share.
 

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You will find the harder recoil of the 300 gr bullets is the reason for the higher point of impact at 25 yards. Reducing bullet weight and/ or velocity will lower the poi without adjusting sights. Titegroup is an excellent powder for mid range 45 colt loads. Trailboss is the best for reduced velocity cast bullet loads.
 

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Generally, an increase in velocity will lower point of impact. Heavier bullets and slower velocities result in more barrel time for the bullet to be affected by the recoil. Obviously, at some point down range, higher velocity will impact higher as the slower bullet starts it’s downward decline closer to the muzzle.
 

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Generally, an increase in velocity will lower point of impact. Heavier bullets and slower velocities result in more barrel time for the bullet to be affected by the recoil. Obviously, at some point down range, higher velocity will impact higher as the slower bullet starts it’s downward decline closer to the muzzle.
I agree that somewhere downrange the heavier bullet will fall below the trajectory of the faster. Probably closer to 50 yards. Up close, the recoil of the heavier bullet will cause a higher poi.
 

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I used to shoot a lot of H110 and 300+ grain bullets and still do a little, but age has overtaken and now shoot a lot of Keith style bullets, 250-265 grains with Unique in the 900-1000fps range and they will flat put the smack down on anything in Virginia. The charm of the old 45 Colt, like the 45-70(amother of my favorites) is that good success is easy to find anywhere in the range of mild to wild. Most of my hot/heavy loads find their way into my 14" Contender barrel.
 

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actually the biggest effect on point of aim comes from dwell time in the barrel. The longer the bullet is in the barrel while its flipping the higher the shot will print. Take your 300 grain bullet at say a 1000 feet per second and see where it hits then bump it to 1200 and it will allways shoot lower at under 50 yards. Its why too a shorter barrel will ususally put a light and a heavy load closer together then a long barreled six gun will. My 4 in 500 Linebaugh will put about any load within an inch of any other at 25 yards and my old 5.5 inch 500 would have up to 6 inches difference in poa. Lower velocity loads allway printing higher. Like bill said 300 grain bulletes in a 45 are fun to play with but for deer, blackbear and pigs there just not needed. A good 255 at 900-1100 fps will do a lot of killing. Ive killed 1200 lb bison with loads like that in 44 mags and 45 colts. Now the 300 might have been an advantage in something like the bison or for big bear or moose but bottom line is one shot and I was eating that bison. Your best bet though if you want to match poa with that acp load without some REAL recoil is going to be a 255 at around 1100 fps. That said some guns will take a bit more some a bit less. you don't have to run an action with your acp loads so a better way of going about it might be to sight in for the 45 colt load you want and back the acp load off or use a heavier acp bullet.
 
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What did the OP finally do for his load goal?





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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'm still working on it. We've had several storms in the gulf so range time has been limited. I'm planning to site in my Colt load at 50 or 60 yards and let it be what it is. I can adjust for the acp's at other ranges once I know where they hit.

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Idk if that directly answered your question. I still have not settled on a load for the Colt's. I have been shopping for a mold in the middle range of weights (250-270).

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I BOUGHT A BIG JUG OF TRAIL BOSS POWDER, ALL THE TOP LOADS WITH IT ARE CLOSE TO BP LOADS. I'M CURRENTLY SHOOTING A BULLET FROM MATTS BULLET THAT WEIGHS 250 GRS AND SHOOTS VERY WELL, ITS A SOLID BASE WADCUTTER, HE HAS A HOLLOW BASE WADCUTTER THAT WEIGHS 240 GRS, BOTH BULLETS SHOOT POA AT 25 YDS IN MY UBERTI 1973 REVOLVER. LOVE TRAILBOSS POWDER. JIMP.
 

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TB seems to burn at lower temperature. Results in less lead fouling. I also like the 210 gr and 305 gr bullets from Matt's.

 

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I'm using 300gr. XTP behind H110 as its a great load and very accurate. I don't worry about trajectory too much as I keep my shots under 150 yards when hunting deer.
 
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