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Discussion Starter #1
My Browning self-destructed Saturday morning.

I was at the range, practicing offhand getting ready for Quigley, and all of a sudden the rifle wouldn't stay cocked!

As I raised the lever, the hammer would not stay back but would follow the the breechblock to the down position. Even when I tried to cock it by hand, the hammer wouldn't stay back.

I took it home, sprayed the action with carb cleaner, re-lubed it, adjusted the trigger screw, etc. - nothing worked. As I close the lever I can look into the bottom of the action and see the "parts" (the sear, I suppose, and whatever the other parts are called) sliding right past one another.

The trigger is the factory trigger which has been re-cut by a gunsmith and used with a lighter trigger spring. I worked great for about 6,000 rounds. Recently, I had one or two accidental discharges, so I adjusted the trigger pull to be a bit heavier. I also noticed that occasionally, a shot would go off with a much lighter than normal pull on the trigger.

Luckily, I have another rifle I can use for Quigley, but what options do I have for the Browning? Has anyone heard of that set trigger sold by "Boomtown" (I think that's the name - they advertise in Black Powder Cartridge News). If the trigger parts are worn, can they be safely recut?
 

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It sounds like you broke the sear spring, almost every body I know (me included) who shoots a Browning has had the sear spring break between 5000 and 10,000 rounds. Both Browning and Brownell's stock replacement springs, they are about $1.oo each (+ - ) plus shipping.

Wayne
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, Coldspring.

Now that you mention it, it does make more sense that something (like the sear spring) broke. If it was the trigger wearing-out, you might expect it to malfunction gradually - like having the hammer drop sometimes, and stay cocked other times.

How do you install the sear spring? I tried to remove the trigger by first removing the stock through-bolt, and then trying to drive out the pin in the middle of the action, but couldn't get it to come out.

I know I took the trigger out myself originally, but I just can't remember how I got it out! Am I supposed to completely remove the buttstock first?
 

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I have both the .40-65 and .45-70 in the BPCR 1885 Browning (never could find an affordable Creedmoor - it was easier to get a Shiloh). I had that same problem when the funs were new and had les than 500 down the barrel. The problem went away by itself. I don't know why?? Neither tirgger was touched by a gunsmith. They are both 100% stock from Browning and both shoot very well. I've just recently gone over to straight BP in the .40 and the groups are impressive at 100-200 yards.
 

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Cooper:

I have a friend who has figured out how to take the Browning apart and more important how to put it back together who installed the new spring for me. I insisted that after I saw how he did it I would be able to do it but he was wrong. Unfortunately it is along way from you to North Texas where we live. Why don't you check and see if there is someone at one of the clubs up there who knows the secret to the puzzle. I do remember that you do not have to remove the stock.

Wayne
 

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Cooper: I hate to say it but Coldspring is wrong. You DO have to take the stock off to remove the trigger. There is a small pin just under the stock wood where the wood and frame meet. This pin should come out easily and the trigger will then come right out. When you get the trigger out look up in the frame and test the sear movement to see if the spring is broken or not. There could be a couple other things going on here. If the spring is not broken be sure the trigger and sear mechcanism is very very clean. With the sear honed by a gunsmith, or the after market trigger screw adjuster installed, both are very susceptable to not holding or pre mature let off with hardly any dirt, grime, or grimey oil powder etc. that may have collected in this area. Brownells would be the place to order the sear spring, and or the J&B inovations trigger adjustment screw. Be warned however though that since your trigger has already been worked on the J&B trigger adjuster is not a good idea to install. Brownells also has a parts diagram you can pull up. If you search the web you can find disassembly instructions for the Browning. Best regards steve witt
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the info, guys.

Now that I'm back from Quigley, I'll start looking at it.

I ran into a friend at the Q and he told me about someone in California who sells a kit to take the Browning completely apart. It consists of a somewhat- "L"-shaped piece of hard plastic which you place underneath the lever, and then close it. This serves to take the tension off of all of the springs. Then it is a simple job to drive out the two pins, and remove and replace the breechblock.

My friend has it and assures me it is easy to do!

I'm going to get it and give it a try.
 

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Cooper,

I'd sure be interested in the kit you referred to. Can you get the sellers contact information from your friend? Thanks

Wayne
 

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Discussion Starter #9
TexasMac I know you saw this on the other site, but I'll post it here for others on this site who might want to see it:

John E. Stepp
26687 Dersch Road
Shingletown, CA 96088
530 - 365 - 7036

My friend who bought it said the price was $25.
 
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