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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm new here, but not new to catchin big cats. I'm a limblining fool in the springtime from about mid March till the freezer gets enough channel and flathead fillets to last a year for my family and my brother's family, as well as enough for some big fish fries.

I used to be a noodler, used barrels and scuba gear, but the state made most of my techniques illegal, and I got older, fatter, and a tad wiser, so I quit that noodlin a few years back. I did get some nice flats back in the noodlin days, up to 70 pounds and some change.

I like to rod-n-reel, but I do that mostly for grins in the summer, and turn most everything loose cause of the full freezer syndrome at the house.

Got a lake right behind the house to the east, and a place to launch the jon boat right down the road to the south about a quarter mile. I manage to catch flats pushing 50 pounds on my lines each spring, and will be more than happy to share any knowledge with you folks.

I'll be checking in pretty often, and I'll keep you folks posted when I start my lining this spring.
 

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Good to have another catfisherman aboard. Things are a little slow here most of the time but it comes in spurts. I think we almost have enough folks to keep this one flowing if folks would just post.

Are limb lines and rod the only way you fish for them? No trotlines or jug fishing? Are you limb lining along a creek, river or large lake?

CM
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yep, the limblines, and the rod-n-reel are bout it. I have used jugs and trotlines. I had a trotline when I was a kid way back in the early 60's, and used to toss a few jug lines out back in those days as well, but it's been a long while since I've done either.

I limbline the upper end of a lake. It's mostly shallow flats, and my poles are attached to stumps along a feeder creek. I get out there and attach the poles when the lake gets down 3 or 4 feet, which it usually does in late summer/early fall. I tag the poles and wait till around the middle of March to put line and hardwear on them.

Around the second week of March is when I can start catching perch. That's what I bait em with.

Watching those big ole flats pull those poles clear under gets my blood to pumpin pretty good. Sometimes I just have to back off in the jon and wait till they let the poles come back up so I can do my business.

I've had a couple of fishin buddies, rod-n-reel, that have said that they just didn't see the fun/sport in limblines.......hahaha, that is till I take them out and let em get their ass wet tryin to get a nice flat in the boat.

I just sit back and laugh. They sometimes loose a good fish for me, but it doesn't matter, it's worth the fun watchin em, and they understand why I limbline after that.
 

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When you say poles do you mean cane poles?

Only way I've ever done it is attach the string to a real honest to goodness limb on the bank. Might be an over hanging limb of a creek, free flowing river or can be in lakes. Never tried using a pole tied to something in lieu of the limbs.

CM
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Cane poles aren't strong enough. I have used them some just to try em out, and they are quick to break with a good cat. I cut saplings and small trees. Willow works well, but the beavers like em too much, and are bad about stealin em. Hickory, river birch, and mimosa seem to work well, and the beavers don't bother them as much.

The poles are usually somewhere from around 12 to around 18 feet long might be about the diameter of a pool ball at the base. Long and skinny. They are attached to the stumps, and hang out over the creek channel. When the lake is full all ya see is those poles sticking up out of the water along the submurged creek.

You limbline where no man has gone before, limbline in trotline territory so to speak.
 
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