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High velocity CB's for head/neck shots.

My wife just tagged an elk with a 300 yard head shot, using a 100 gr jacketed 243 rifle. I told her to go for the heart when we first spotted the elk, but it vanished in the brush before she could take a sure aim. When it appeared again up the mountain at 300 yards, it stopped with it's body almost dead lengthwise, which presented only a paunch or texas heart shot, neither of which the 234 is capable of taking on. But its head was turned back watching her, as the elk pondered whether to run some more or what, so the invite to stay for dinner was presented just under and forward of the eye, and went back to shatter the atlas joint. All thoughts of running were instantly abandoned!
After witnessing the shot and cutting up the meat, with less than a half pound of bloody meat. I've concluded that for my next big game hunting I will be using paper patched tin lead bullets, (patched with the GOP method) at velocities of 3300 to 3400 fps from a 30-06.

I have head shot a fair number of deer down through the years, but always refrained from it in preference to chest shots if a good broadside or quartering shot could be made. The main reason I didn't like head shots was that I've always used deep penetrating bullets, which because their impact isn't extremely violent, can leave a wounded animal if the bullet doesn't hit the skull solidly. With an explosive bullet, we have another matter. Any kind of solid head or neck hit will open up a 4 inch cavity with instant knockdown, no getting up, and sticking isn't required, as bleed out is rapid, and complete if the distance to walk to the animal is 100 yards or more. (Her elk was almost done bleeding when we got up to it.) There is no adrenalin laden meat, so flavor is tops and freezer storage life is optimum.

My decision wasn't made just because of this one elk kill. A local hunter who is over 80 years old, has been using Hornady 110 gr RN 30 cal bullets at 3200 fps for the deer him and his wife have taken for at least 30 years. His reason is named above, and he had partially sold me on the idea before my wifes elk. If the range is too long for a certain head shot, they aim for the lungs, which is what I propose to do. Same if the animal is moving and presents a broadside picture.

If you are wondering why all the fuss when even a 22 LR will kill deer cleanly with head shots. (IF THE BRAIN IS HIT!) -- The reason I'm hot about using cast is two fold. First is the matter of ultra high speed cast and a flatter trajectory than ever deemed possible with cast bullets. When I first developed the GOP method I wasn't hotly inspired because lead bullets cannot be made that will penetrate deep and produce relitively slim wound channels if velocities go too high. It was already easy to obtain the 2400 2600 fps speeds that lead will withstand and penetrate deep in all weather. Second is the matter of using any deep penetrating bullet on head neck shots and them not having the massive shock needed for sure and instant kills if the bullet hits some distance from the brain. These will do it superbly well, and still leave the option of lung shots if one wants to preserve a good rack for mounting or if the range is too long for the head neck shot. In this case, velocity will have slowed until the bullet will penetate very well without over destruction.

If the concept sounds good to you, check out our website, and look around on this forum for more information about GOP (Glue On Patch) bullets. They are super for all varmints, even pure lead can be shot at extreme velocities, patching is as wraping a bandade on your finger, no sizing or equipment for it is needed, gas check cost is eliminated and accuracy will be superior to any standard cast.
 

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Re: High velocity DB's for head/neck shots.

I have seen your gop method mentioned in a couple of post and have been looking for more detailed information. I have not been able to find it on your website. Does your book give detailed info about this method also?

I have been throwing around getting into casting for a few months. I will probably start casting first for my 357 max encore carbine. I know that I don't need the glue on patching for the velocities that I shoot but it sounds like a really slick setup.

I will probably start getting things together to start sometime after Christmas. Thanks for your time.

Chris
 

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Re: High velocity DB's for head/neck shots.

I got Veral to make me a mold for my Ruger SuperRedhawk chambered in 454 Casull and my pistol shoots them great! I cant wait to try them out during deer season. I will admit that veral's molds are higher but they are well worth the extra cash!
 

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Re: High velocity CB's for head/neck shots.

GOP bullets are for rifle or fixed chamber guns. The patch can be paper glued on, or computer labels just wrapped on. Due to very low barrel friction, chamber pressure with any given powder charge/bullet weight will be much lower than jacketed, with higher velocities. When loaded to equal pressures, velocities can be extremely high. There is NO BARREL FOULING. The bore looks like a mirror after a few shots.

I didn't realize it wasn't mentioned in my catalog, and I'm sorry about that. It is available with any bullet weight, profile and caliber listed for standard cast bullets. Production time is considerably slower than for gas checked bullets, so most people wouldn't be interested in using it for loads which gas checks can handle readily. However, with the ever increasing price of gas checks, and the fact that GOP bullets are more accurate, in all the tests I've done, I believe the time has come for the concept to take off. They work great for low velocity loads with suitable powders all the way up to full throttle in most large powder capacity rifle chamberings, and most delightfull of all, very soft alloys will shoot as accurately as hard, without fouling.

The GOP patching method was developed after my book was written, so if anyone has questions which would be of a general interest, post them here and I'll answer here, or write me for any personal questions about ordering etc.
 

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Re: High velocity CB's for head/neck shots.

I was looking at getting two different moulds. I wanted one that was lighter that could be pushed faster to shot flatter. I was initially thinking about something in the 180 gr range, but I saw your 200 gr. spitzer has a bearing surface length of .375. The throat in my rifle is app. .300 long. I normally seat the bullets out to the rifling, but this would only leave about .075 in the case. Will seating the bullet short of the rifling affect accuracy significantly? What would you consider the minimum necessary seating depth for these bullets.

For the second mould I wanted a heavy wfn. I was thinking something in the 250 gr range. I am looking to push this bullet at approximately 1700 fps. I have gotten over 2000 fps with a 200 gr. gas check cast bullet without pressure issues.

Is there any way to have a general idea of the velocity difference with the gop compared to normal cast bullets? I have been shotting a 200 gr cast bullet but obviously with the spitzer taking up less case capacity, I should be able to get a little more velocity. I was just wondering if switching to the patched bullets will also give me an increase in velocity. Thanks again for you time.

I realize that my questions may be getting away from the area of general interest, and if you would rather email me with a response that is fine. [email protected]

Chris
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Re: High velocity CB's for head/neck shots.

The forum is a good place for your questions, as the one about velocity increase with GOP over standard cast was not addressed fully in my explanation. I would estimate a 20% velocity increase with GOP if pressures are brought up to the same level as either jacketed or standard cast in a bottle neck rifle cartridge. With your maximum case it may be a bit less, as I believe cast will slip out quiet a bit easier than jacketed, which isn't true in larger rifle chamberings, where I've found pressures to be very close to equal with heavy cast loads with duplicate jacketed velocities. I'm making this statement with the understanding that I am considering LBT bullet lubricant, which will shoot at lower pressure than any other cast bullet lubricant I know of.

I'm quite sure you'll get way over 1700 fps with the 250 gr WFN in GOP, and suggest that you order just the one mold till you have worked with it a bit. Understand that I DO NOT recommend a soft alloy for this caliber/bullet weight, as it will expand to far too large a frontal diameter and limit penetration too much. You'll get best performance on big game, ie, body shots on deer and larger, with an alloy hardness of at least 20 bhn. For primarily head neck shots or carefully placed lung shots a soft alloy gets the nod as I explained above for high velocity rifles.

Also, understand that best bullet weight for head neck shots as I described at the start of this post, I believe at least 120 gr for calibers 7 MM and larger, with 160 gr and higher being best, so long as the caliber has potential for around 3000 fps with the weight. I'll discuss this matter of bullet weight for specific guns personally with anyone interested in getting a GOP mold. We do need a high BC if long range shots will be common, while a blunt bullet will be far the best if one feels quite certain that the longest shots will be under 200 yards. The reason blunt works best is that the flat nose is working when it makes contact, whereas a spitzer has to penetrate a couple inches before expansion provides a good flat for producing shock.

My post may not be of interest to the general hunting population, as for those who have to travel long distances at high expense to hunt, and especially those who are interest in a mountable trophy, will not want to destroy the mount with a head shot that crushes the skull and possibly removes a large portion of skin which can't be patched. For those body shots with bullets capable of doing business from any angle will always be best. For meat hunters, and especially those who live close to or on the hunting land, don't mind passing on an animal or two to get the right shot, I believe the head neck shot to be of considerable interest, be that for deer bear elk or moose.
 
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