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i took my ultra .223 out the other day to shoot and i sat it on the bench and laid into it. i reached out and put my hand accross the barrel just forward of the forarm and pulled it back into my shoulder and tried to hold the crosshairs on a dime sized bull at 50 yards. just the beat of my heart made the crosshairs move back and forth abt twice the width of the bull.
how do i remedy this?? i tried not holding onto it so tight but if i let off much more the gun would not sit upright and would cant the shot
thanks,
sureshot
 

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Actually, I put the least amount of pressure on the gun, either to my shoulder or otherwise, that the recoil will let me.

I find that works well for the bench.

Also you might consider using less power, higher power on the scope only amplifies the problem. It becomes a mental thing.

I have read that 1,000 yard shooters often use a 4 or 6X scope.
 

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really 4x or 6x what models? I want to trade(somehow) my Nikon Pro-staff 3-9x40 for the Buck 4x (only $10 than the pro-staff).
 

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sureshot2040

Shooting off a bench accurately requires a repeatable setup. Your left hand has no business on the barrel. The forearm rests on the front bag and the stock on on the rear bunny bag. Remove the sling studs so the rifle can slide at least 1/4" in recoil. Fine elevation adjustments are done by squeezing the ears on the rear bag with your left hand.

The scope power has no other function than to see the target well. For load testing I frequently use my 36 power target scope so I can hold on a a 1/8" black dot at 100 yards and know the dispersion of the shots. Only the trigger finger touches the gun.

With a Handi you need to put some masking tape as a marker on the forearm so the rifle is set up each time at exactly on the same spot.

A system like that will tell you all sorts of problems, if the set up is the same for each shot. Your 3-9 scope is better for bench shooting at 9x than 4x. Long range target or varmint shooters do not use 4x scopes.
Just because you can't see the x-hair wobbling does not mean there no wobble. :eek:

If you see your heart beat in the scope, your hold is wrong. or you may have to shoot between heart beats. You need a powerful scope for that and good arobic condititioning to slow down your heart beat with proper breathing.
 

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Every thing Fred said is right on. On day's that I can use my scope on 32 pr. ,I use it. You can see the crosshair move as little as .030 " with a scope that powerfull. Also I like to pound the forend down into the front bag,dryfire thegun and check for movement in the crosshairs when the hammer falls. For the heartbeat thing,I go to Walmart pharmacy and use there bloodpressure machine to practice lowering my heartrate,(yes it can be done)It may take awhile to get the hang of it,but its neat to watch the heartrate and pressure go down while you're doing it. I usually shoot when I'm getting a little light headed. Also you can drive nurse's crazy trying to get your correct reading. :-D I hope this helps. Digger
 

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The story I read said they did this to allow them to focus on the entire black of the target as a bullseye. I'll try to locate the article to reference it.

I doubt there is any consensus on a brand of scope.

Other than that Fred said it all. My particular Handi doesn't seem to care where I rest it, as long as it's NOT on the barrel. That is with the 24" 223 barrel. a lighter barrel in larger caliber might be a different story.
 

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From my personal shooting, in which I am ever practicing to perfect....is to take several deep breaths..rest and relax your mind. Focus on the target/dot and clear your mind of all but achieving your objective. Focus on the target not the crosshairs, Take your time, and concentrate. Think of where you are putting you check on the stock, where you hold everything, does it feel the same as the last time you fired your last round? If not then realign to make it. Then I take a very deep breath, and hold for a split second, and exhale all the air left in my lungs ..and relax and hold...this is my opportune time. My heart rate and time is all slowed down. This time doesn't last long. If you hold your breath to long your heart will start to beat harder. At least mine does. And then I have waited to long.

Perhaps this isn't the absolute best advice from a world class champion target shooter, but it puts me in the frame of mind I need to be.
 
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