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My Red Setter, Stormy, pointing two pigeons I had planted for him.


Flushed the first and he's watching it fly away.


Then while the first bird was leaving I flushed the second and he's watching it.
 

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Sorry to ask, but is your red setter the same as an Irish Setter? It seems to me that when I was into pointing dogs 30 years ago, all of the Irish Setters in the U.S. were drooling idiotic show dogs, with zero hunting traits left.

I was also reading back then, that a kennel somewhere in the U.S. was importing extremely good hunting English Setters from England, and slowly breeding them back into the Irish Setter line, to get good hunting Irish Setters again.

Of course, the show dog people were outraged, saying they were polluting the purebred Irish Setter lines.

Mannyrock
 

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Sorry to ask, but is your red setter the same as an Irish Setter? It seems to me that when I was into pointing dogs 30 years ago, all of the Irish Setters in the U.S. were drooling idiotic show dogs, with zero hunting traits left.
Geeeze Manny! :rolleyes: Now you got us both thinking about our pointing dog days!
:tango_face_grin:

The Irish Setters were pretty much the way you describe back 40 - 45 years ago also. :tango_face_plain: I had one that fit your description exactly. :tango_face_sad: I didn't have him long... :tango_face_wink:

But later, at Ft. Rucker, Alabama, I used to bird hunt with a guy who owned a pointing Irish. We would run the GWP I mentioned in the other thread and him in a brace hunting quail.

He wasn't bad, a lot faster then my dog, but there was one problem. One day both dogs crashed through a cockleburr patch. When they came out the other side my Wirehair just shook most of the burrs off. But you can imagine what that Irish, with his long, thick, silky, fine hair looked like! :tango_face_surprise
 

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I had two English pointers.

One was a huge lemon and brown, big running female, out of the Elhew line. Absolutely impossible to keep up with her on foot. She would run across a 300 yard wide muddy plowed field, and point a bird on the other side. She would hold point like a statue, but by the time that you slogged across that field on foot, the bird would be gone, and you would be shaking and drenched in sweat.

The other was a small, scrawny male, liver spotted named Dough, who ambled along slowly and sniffed absolutely everything. Would not run even medium distances. But, he pointed every bird he ever got within distance of, and held locked solid.

Three years of those two dogs were enough. I gave them away for free to someone I trusted, rather than selling them to a stranger.

By the time I left Memphis 10 years ago, it was impossible to find decent land to hunt (there was plenty of land, plowed right up to the road pavement, with no birds), and the field trial crowd was rich and very snotty.

Wish I had been around in the 50s when the hunting was really great.

Mannyrock
 

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A little off topic, but worth a mention - If you like dogs in general, and history, and in this particular case an English Pointer and WWII in the Pacific theater, then a great read is the book "No Better Friend" by Robert Weintraub.

It's about life and death in Japanese prison camps and how a man and a dog kept each other alive. I found it a fascinating read.
 

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Geeeze Manny! :rolleyes: Now you got us both thinking about our pointing dog days!
:tango_face_grin:

The Irish Setters were pretty much the way you describe back 40 - 45 years ago also. :tango_face_plain: I had one that fit your description exactly. :tango_face_sad: I didn't have him long... :tango_face_wink:

But later, at Ft. Rucker, Alabama, I used to bird hunt with a guy who owned a pointing Irish. We would run the GWP I mentioned in the other thread and him in a brace hunting quail.

He wasn't bad, a lot faster then my dog, but there was one problem. One day both dogs crashed through a cockleburr patch. When they came out the other side my Wirehair just shook most of the burrs off. But you can imagine what that Irish, with his long, thick, silky, fine hair looked like! :tango_face_surprise
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My GWP worked slow and close in. Exactly what I wanted. The only trouble was the Germans bred them to be an all-around hunting dog and all around he was! He was great on quail, but would also point rabbits, turtles and rattlesnakes! And he would definitely run deer... :rolleyes: But he was a great pet, it's said they hunt to please their masters, and he was very good with the young kids I had at the time.

When I got him there were only around 1500 of the breed registered in the FDSB. And ya know what, his line may still be around. When I was at Ft. Benning I had to attend a reception at a BG's quarters. Seems to me he was the CG of the Ranger Training command but I may be wrong. Anyway, there was a kennel in his backyard and low and behold there was a GWP in it! :tango_face_surprise:

So while making small talk with the general's wife, I mentioned I had one also. When she found out it was a male she ran off and got her husband. His was a female, in heat, and he had been unable to find a stud to breed her. Well ol' Gunner was happy to undertake the task. With positive results I might add. :tango_face_grin:

By the time I left Memphis 10 years ago, it was impossible to find decent land to hunt ... Wish I had been around in the 50s when the hunting was really great.
It's the same way in Jawja now. :tango_face_sad: There used to be plenty of land to hunt and plenty of quail. No so anymore. Like you say; impossible. :tango_face_crying:
 

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I have had the pleasure of hiunting behind a HUNTING DOG. I didn't own her my brother did, she was a Springer Spanial and would hunt alsorts of game from birds to Rabbits and squirrels and retrive same.

My self I have had a Springer but not in the class with my brothers but a good fellow just the same. A vizla was as close as I ever came to owning a hunting dog in the class with my brothers.

Today I have a Ryman style English setter and she is a bird hunting dog. She will point deer and let me know they are around she also points song birds along with game birds. Rabbits and squirrels she would give the finger to if she had fingers, a regular snob dog.


Isn't there a hunting dog section farther down?

:D Al
 

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As a teen, I had a Flat Coat Retriever that was the smartest dog I've ever seen.
The picture below is not my old rover, but that's what he looked like.
I miss him.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I have had the pleasure of hiunting behind a HUNTING DOG. I didn't own her my brother did, she was a Springer Spanial and would hunt alsorts of game from birds to Rabbits and squirrels and retrive same.

My self I have had a Springer but not in the class with my brothers but a good fellow just the same. A vizla was as close as I ever came to owning a hunting dog in the class with my brothers.

Today I have a Ryman style English setter and she is a bird hunting dog. She will point deer and let me know they are around she also points song birds along with game birds. Rabbits and squirrels she would give the finger to if she had fingers, a regular snob dog.


Isn't there a hunting dog section farther down?

:D Al
I believe there is not but this is about simply bird dog's. Got a few more photo's I' like to post. Actually I've got several hundred but don't have enough time to post them.

My Bodie. Lost him Jan 2017


Someone mentioned Pointer's


I'd bet there's a bunch on here with Britt's


Gordon's can look awful good on point!


Brace of Britt's heading out.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Sorry to ask, but is your red setter the same as an Irish Setter? It seems to me that when I was into pointing dogs 30 years ago, all of the Irish Setters in the U.S. were drooling idiotic show dogs, with zero hunting traits left.

I was also reading back then, that a kennel somewhere in the U.S. was importing extremely good hunting English Setters from England, and slowly breeding them back into the Irish Setter line, to get good hunting Irish Setters again.

Of course, the show dog people were outraged, saying they were polluting the purebred Irish Setter lines.

Just found this article in Gun Dog Magazine on the Red Setter.
http://www.gundogmag.com/breeds/gundog_breeds_todays_red_setter/


Mannyrock
Don't remember where I answer about the same question just recently. If you want to believe the record keeper', Amer Fld nd AKC, tjey are the same dog. But if you ever see a red setter it will become immediately obvious they are not one and the same. The AKC Irish Setter hasn't been born that can stay with a Rd Setter. This not knowing by you is exactly where I was when I saw my first two Red's. That would be Stormy's sire and ****. Breelie, his **** was 2011 Region 10 shooting dog of the year.



His sire is owned by long time retriever people and is also really nice dog but get's trialed extremely little, he hunt's a lot!


Neither of these dog's get' much in the way of grooming! In around 1950 a few guy's that loved Irih Setter's and hated what AKC show people did to the got together and did all that was necessary to greatly improve the Red Setter to the one that was known in the late 1800's and what we see today. They found the best hunting Irish in the country, well what they thought was the best, and crossed it with 1946 Nat Ch Mississippi Zev, an English Setter. They had to keep records of their breeding for whatever time it was and they did. Presented that to both Amer Fld and AKC and got accepted as Irish Setter's. That is what both are registered as today. But not long after the first Red got registered with AKC the bench people figured out pretty quick there would be no more dual Ch Irish. The Irish Setter club is made up mostly of show people and that is what they did to the breed. Same dog? I don't believe so II don't try to pass them off as anything other than Red Setter's. There are Reds registered with AKC but once the Irish Setter Club of America figured out they couldn't produce another Dual Ch, they screamed at AKC. Well some were already there and at the time even today with all the other breed's, there's an agreement that what one register's so will the other, except, The Red Setter. To Registed a Red now With AKC it either come's from two AKC Re's or if from Amer Fld, needs to go though DNA testing! They have a better article about their history on NRSFTC. Been around a long time and I'd never known about them till I saw Stormy's sire and **** run up in Washington about 6 yrs ago!

Are they the same, depends on who you ask. Most Red Setter people call them Red's, not Irish!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Sorry to ask, but is your red setter the same as an Irish Setter? It seems to me that when I was into pointing dogs 30 years ago, all of the Irish Setters in the U.S. were drooling idiotic show dogs, with zero hunting traits left.

I was also reading back then, that a kennel somewhere in the U.S. was importing extremely good hunting English Setters from England, and slowly breeding them back into the Irish Setter line, to get good hunting Irish Setters again.

Of course, the show dog people were outraged, saying they were polluting the purebred Irish Setter lines.

Mannyrock
Don't remember where I answer about the same question just recently. If you want to believe the record keeper', Amer Fld nd AKC, tjey are the same dog. But if you ever see a red setter it will become immediately obvious they are not one and the same. The AKC Irish Setter hasn't been born that can stay with a Rd Setter. This not knowing by you is exactly where I was when I saw my first two Red's. That would be Stormy's sire and ****. Breelie, his **** was 2011 Region 9 shooting dog of the year.



His sire is owned by long time retriever people and is also really nice dog but get's trialed extremely little, he hunt's a lot!


Neither of these dog's get' much in the way of grooming! In around 1950 a few guy's that loved Irih Setter's and hated what AKC show people did to the got together and did all that was necessary to greatly improve the Red Setter to the one that was known in the late 1800's and what we see today. They found the best hunting Irish in the country, well what they thought was the best, and crossed it with 1946 Nat Ch Mississippi Zev, an English Setter. They had to keep records of their breeding for whatever time it was and they did. Presented that to both Amer Fld and AKC and got accepted as Irish Setter's. That is what both are registered as today. But not long after the first Red got registered with AKC the bench people figured out pretty quick there would be no more dual Ch Irish. The Irish Setter club is made up mostly of show people and that is what they did to the breed. Same dog? I don't believe so II don't try to pass them off as anything other than Red Setter's. There are Reds registered with AKC but once the Irish Setter Club of America figured out they couldn't produce another Dual Ch, they screamed at AKC. Well some were already there and at the time even today with all the other breed's, there's an agreement that what one register's so will the other, except, The Red Setter. To Registed a Red now With AKC it either come's from two AKC Re's or if from Amer Fld, needs to go though DNA testing! They have a better article about their history on NRSFTC. Been around a long time and I'd never known about them till I saw Stormy's sire and **** run up in Washington about 6 yrs ago!

Are they the same, depends on who you ask. Most Red Setter people call them Red's, not Irish!
 

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My hunting poodle is such a great retriever, that when he finds a dead rabbit on the side of the road, he picks it up and brings it back to my doorstep!

A couple of weeks ago, he got a big gash on his face, from a one hour fight with a very big ground hog. Trapped the hop in a set of heavy bushes and charged in a snapped at it non-stop. I could see it from my front porch, and decided to just let it play out. The groundhog growled so loud, it sounded like a dog.

The groundhog would respond to every charge by my dog with a counter-charge, biting and snapping himself. Eventually, he bit my dog on the face and the blood was really flowing.

At that point, I had to call it off and go in and stop it. I was afraid that my dog would drop dead of heat stroke.

I let the groundhog run away. I kinda like having them around.

Mannyrock



Mannyrock
 

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very pretty dog. Ive got a chocolate lab that lays on the bank of my pond and just watches the ducks play. they don't excite him and he doesn't excite them. Might hunt for some food though.
 

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My English setter, Belle. What a great dog and companion she was. Died of cancer a few months ago.
Here she is during one of her very rare trips into the big city....Brooklyn. Pigeons were a source of constant attention.
Don’t know why it came up sideways.
 

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I have two black labs, a male named Harvey and a female named Mabel. I train both for waterfowl hunting and Harvey is trained for upland as well. Mabel is only a year old so I won't train her on upland until next year. I wait until they're 2 to train them for upland because in waterfowl training especially on blind retrieves you are trying to ingrain in them to always run straight lines. With upland they are always quartering so they can develop bad habits trying to train both at the same time.
 

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