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For the record, I'm starting out with .459 405grn cast bullets. Of course it will all be trial & error to learn the process, but I'm curious as to how long after pouring the lead into the mold before I can open the mold & drop out the bullet.

Thanks,

Robert in the hills of NC
 

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How long do I have to leave them in the mol

I usuallly knock off the sprue as soon as it hardens, and by the time you do that it is usually OK to drop the bullet. Some folks give it a few seconds.
 

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How long do I have to leave them in the mol

Bullets that long and heavy, let is sit for about a count of four after the sprue hardens....longer than that won't hurt, but the sprue sets up hard and it's more difficult to knock the plate over.

HArd to be exact...if the sprue is ahrd to cut when the plate is knocked over, probably waited too long....if the mold collects a lot of lead smearing across the blocks, then proably opening too early.
 

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How long do I have to leave them in the mol

Shoot the tops of the blocks and the underside of the sprue plate with mould release or scribble all over them with a soft pencil to prevent smearing and galling.

If you see molten centers, you knocked the sprue off too soon. If it takes more than a tap, you waited too long. Easy to get the hang of how long.
 

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How long do I have to leave them in the mol

I always cast with two molds of similar size. I fill one and set it while I fill the other. I use two collection boxes and a third box for spues and culls. Best system I've tried never too soon so no smeared lead and no sitting twiddling my thumbs waiting for a mold to cool. Mold temp stays consistent also.
 

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How long do I have to leave them in the mol

When to remove bullets from mold?

I watch the sprue as it cools. When it first freezes it will have a glossy sheen. Moments later that turns to something of a frosty appearance. Following on the heels of that is an appearance that I think looks a bit like cold flour gravy, sort of muddy looking. Then I cut the sprue and drop the bullet.

You can get some sort of idea simply by looking at the base of the bullet (assuming you are using a base pour mold). If the sprue area looks torn and cratered, you are going too early. You want a shiny cut appearance in the sprue area. If you wait too long, the sprue is hard to cut, requiring a solid rap with the mallet.
 
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