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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
how do I check to see if a revolver is tight? How do I check the timing? I am looking at a ruger single action. There is some black residue on the top strap right by the barrel. How much would be considered cutting of the top strap. Is there other things I should be looking for. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
 

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stright-shooter-x said:
how do I check to see if a revolver is tight? How do I check the timing? I am looking at a ruger single action. There is some black residue on the top strap right by the barrel. How much would be considered cutting of the top strap. Is there other things I should be looking for. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
Cock the hammer, pull the trigger and let the hammer down easy continue holding the trigger in. Now check cylinder play...this is the position and "tightness" of the cylinder at the moment of firing.
The timing can be checked by slowly pulling the hammer back while watching the cylinder. The cylinder stop should engage just before the hammer locks in the coked position.
The top strap is OK as long as there is no noticeable metal errosion.
Check the crown and forcing cone for squareness and nicks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thank you for the advice I bought.

it is not a single action Blackhawk like I thought first. It's a red hawk. It looks like the Blackhawks hunter with the integrated scope Mount. Thank you again
 

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Also Check for

In addition to what Jeff said to check...also place a bore-light in the barrel at the forcing cone and look down the length of teh barrel. Look to see if the walls of the bore are scuffed.

Also check to see if you see any cracks or pitting or surface rust in the walls of the bore. Obviously if you detect any cracks or pitting forget the gun. Surface rust can be usually cleaned and polished away.

If you don't have a bore light handy, take a piece of white paper and with the cylinder out or removed put the paper immediately behind teh forcing cone. This will reflect the outside light up the bore walls just as good as a bore light.

Cheers!

SkyDancer
 

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Used revolvers

straight-shooter-x: you have to look for a couple of things. (1) turn the revolver towards you and look to see that the cylinder crane (the part that swings the cylinder out) fits flush with the the frame. If there is any spacing between the crane and the frame you revolver may have seen pressures at teh upper limits, or beyond.

(2) cycle the action slowly by pulling the hammer back to a full cock position, very slowly, for two full revolutions of the cylinder. Check to see that the cylinder stop properly seats in the cylinder notches, either just as or just before the hammer goes into full cock. If it does this on all 6 chambers, twice, it's good. If the cylinder stop does not properly index at full cock, your advancing hand may need replacement. If you thumb the hammer back with any degree of force or speed and the cylinder stop indexes properly, but not when done slowly, you may need to replace that 'hand'.

(3) check for any loose sights. (4) check for lead rings in the chambers, which would indicate that cases shorter than full length factory ammo have been used (ie, 44 Spl in 44 mag chambers) and may prevent full length cartridge chambering.

(5) use a wooden dowl the size of the bullet to assure that the barrel and individual chambers line up properly so that you don't experience bullet shaving (6) use a bore light to check the barrel for copper or lead fouling. (7) cycle the action to check for any binding.

Hope this helps. Good luck. Mikey.
 
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