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Discussion Starter #1
i own a .357 mag revolver. some company manuals call for magnum primers, others like remington call for just 5 1/2, federal is 200, and yet i read in winchester about using spm. how do i know lets say i want to use cci primers , how do i know if i can use them in a .357mag shell. with what type of powder. what i am asking is what if i am using winchester case, or remington case, and using hodgdon powder. do i need several different brands of primers. i know i will need small pistol primers, but when do i know if it should be a magnum primer. do i change primers because i use a different reloading manual. i am not going to start reloading untill i feel comfortable with everything. what happens when a store carries only winchester cases, and only non magnum primers. plz help . aj
 

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Primers

A good place to start is with the primer that is used in the source of the load. When I try a load from a loading manual or one of the guides the powder companies publish, I try to use the primer, powder, case, bullet, and even the o.a.l. that is published, if possible. Changing any component can raise or lower the pressure, and/or the velocity. The companies that develop this data do a fairly good job of combining compoments that work together. After I test what they list, I will then chage one component at a time and observe not only the accuracy but the pressure signs. When you change any component, be sure to reduce the powder charge and work back up to your original charge, while watching for pressure signs. 8)
 

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And with Ball powders

abj

The other reason one would routinely use magnum primers is when you are using ball (spehrical) powders. They are somewhat harder to ignite than the extruded powders and need the extra heat to burn completely. You will find that Winchester routinely reecommends magnum primers with their ball powders.
 

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i am just starting reloading, so i hv a que

I do not know what load book you are using, but most manuals list Magnum Primers for use in the 357 Magnum. I believe that the 357 mag is the only application that Winchester lists for a small pistol magnum primer in their manual.
 

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reloading, fast or slow powders

i also have another question concerning reloading, i am just pratice shooting , no hunting, but i can usually hit what i am aiming at. but there can be alot of improvement. when buying powders , some say use fast burning powders for more velosity , but i also have read that its good to slow it down abit. i have a .357 mag revolver. they say it is also easier on the cases, and the gun. i cant afford more than two powders, one is going to be hodgdon and the other is still a question. could someone help again. i am the greenhorn , the wrote in yesterday. thank for your help . it is much appreciated. aj][/b]
 

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357 loads

abj, your question is a bit difficult to answear. Sometimes you may have to try a few powders to find one works good in your particular revolver. I think a good place to start is with Alliant Unique. You want to use a 158 gr. cast Semi-wad cutter. Most gun shops will carry these at a very reasonable price. But you need to smooth the inside of your barrel by shooting about 500 jacketed bullets through the gun, if there is not that many jacketed bullets through it all ready. Clean the barrel with a good copper solvent, like sweet's 7.62, about every 30 rounds, to insure the bullets are polishing the barrel and not the fouling from the previously fired bullets. After the barrel is smooth you can fire the lead bullets without too much leading. Be sure to clean out any jacket fouling with the copper solvent before firing lead bullets. You want to keep the velocity under about 1000 fps. with the plain base lead bullets. About 5.5 grs. of Unique should be good. Use about 7.0 grs. of Unique with a 158 gr. jacketed bullet. A standard primer will be ok. At 7.0 grs. you will get a 1000 rounds from a pound of powder. These are low to moderate loads, depending on the loading manual. You stated you were new to reloading, so you may want to get some books that explain about watching for pressure signs, and how to reload safely. 8)
 

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types of powder reply

thanks joe for your help, i got my presses a year ago last christmas, and have been reading ever since. i have read as many safety manual that i can find, either on the web or by book. i have pictures of bulging primers, and bullets that are miss shaped because of too much powder. i have learned to use powder and charges that are more than half case full on one charge, that way its hard to overcharge. i take this seriously. and plan on reading and asking many more questions yet. i am going to go strictly by reciepe, and work with the minimum charges where it says that i can. i have taken gun courses in handleing by law enforcement, ect. i have been shooting and or hunting since i was ten years old. i have also read the stories of reloaders who have been interrupted, and accidently over charged their cases, and blew up their guns. i also want this to be a fun and learning experience. thanks for your help, and i am looking forward to your help in the future. abj[/b]
 

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fast powders mean fast bullets?

someone was asking where i read or saw. this as an implecation that fast powder means high velosity, its in the hodgdon 27th data manual,page 11, the powders are listed according to speed of burn. H-4227 it says is the fastest of our extreme extruded rifle propellants. because of its burning speed, it doubles as a magnum pistol powder.......it is listed as faster burning than hodgens H-110, and then in the manual it shows that the h-4227 will push a 110gr bullet faster than the uninversal clay powder, which is a slower burning powder. so there are contradictions to almost anything, if you look hard enough. but i am just getting started in the handloading, so i have a lot to learn. thank-you for your replies. i do stick to the books when it comes to loading cases, i am doing this as a hobbie,because i like to shoot, but i am reading alot, and becoming more familiar with the powders. thanks for all your answers and information, its much appreciated . abj
 
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