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In our part of the country we have this plague. It is called the developer. They come in and buy up all of the land around your quiet country home [that you can't afford] and break it up and build houses on it. In a few years your piece of paradise that you worked and scraped for is surrounded by a sub-division. The land that you grew up hunting on , rambling around on and enjoying the quite solitude of nature on , is suddenly filled with houses. It really makes a guy feel hemmed in. Gone are the silent starry nights , and soon to be gone are the impromptu shooting sessions. Couple that with news of the day being more gun control , peta wanting to take away hunting and the general shape of the republic......makes me wonder if I could find work in Alaska , or if living in the early 1800's would not have been better , when you knew all of your neighbors[who were more than a mile away] and they all stood for the same things as you. :-\
 

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Don't have most of those problems here in rural western NY state..but then, there aren't many jobs either...

I guess where the money and jobs go, people follow..all kinds of people...
 

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My next career, I think will be as a hermit. I think I would be good at it, and most would not miss me.
 

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Sometimes I think that we were just born too late...I am getting old enough now to enjoy some of the modern comforts and take them for granted but it wasn't always like this. Twenty years ago I would have told you that I was born 150yrs too late for sure. I would have liked to have targeted the golden era of the 1820's and the fur trading to have been my prime years.

The predator hunting helps out quite abit. When the deer season closes down and the cold rolls in I pretty much have the woods to myself. When you get that cold, overcast, afternoon and you are out there alone, the solitude can be great and it is not to hard to imagine that you have slipped back in time.

Back to the subject though...I have personally lost access to at least 250 acers of land...have lost even more to the fencerow to fencerow farming practices. I have enough for myself and a couple of others and I am very fortunate that it is private ground. Sure isn't like it used to be though...It will be a sad day when I have to spend (too much) for that weekend deer hunt.
 

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While it makes you despair the other folks are not much happier than you are. They wish to have a place where they can live as you described.
It is tough, but you can't have it all sometimes--well, most of the time.
I understand though.
Blessings
 

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That :wilderness is still there. You just have to drive a little further to get there . I know what you mean though. Growing up on the edge of town on a dead end road, backed up to woods. I could wonder around the woods & not see a roof top. Those woods are gone now. Today I have to work real hard to find woods to hunt & not see another hunter. Buts its worth it Opening day of gun season I didnt see a nother hunter all day State land 1 hr from the house. But I can see lights from the highway in one direction & lights from a subdivision in the other direction.
 

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How long has it taken the US population to double this last time? And it will take less time for the next double. Everybody has a dream of peace and quiet; a reward for their labour. It's fine to buy a two by twice piece of ground that buts up against 1000 acres that you want to treat like your own but when the owner of the 1000 acres decides to carve it up into quarter acre building lots, don't get mad at him. Its his, not your's. He'd probably sold it to you if you'd of asked.
 

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Several years ago a big farm around Bowlinggreen KY was ruined just as has been described. New fat cat houses went up with all the yuppies and their yuppie pets. Cats, padoodles, you get the picture. Problem was, nobody told the coyotes they had to move out. All the yuppie puppies and cats were disappearing very quickly. They called the county, not my problem they said. They called the state, not my job, then tried fish and wildlife stating that the coyotes wouldn't kill and eat their pets if the state fed their critters better. :D. They tried live trapping them, but they came back in just a few days. Nevrer did hear how it finally turned out. The yotes ate well for quite some time. POWDERMAN. :D :D :D :D :D :D
 

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It is quite ironic that they clear off the land, build the houses, then the people put plastic & concrete animals around for landscaping ???
I hope the Coyotes get them all :eek: ;D ;)
 

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It is a joke. They leave bowls of tasty dog and cat food on the patio for Rover and Fifi and wonder why the coyotes and ***** keep hanging around. They plant all of those high dollar succulents aound their houses and wonder why the deer hadn't rather eat briars and sticks back in the woods.
 

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I live in the house my dad built in '59&'60. a little over 7 acre's, what use to be a cow pasture/woods. Use to see a flock of pheasants come up thru the woods along a line of trees and roost everynight. Havn't seen a pheasant in the last 10 years, heard one about 5 years ago. Sounded kinda lonely. All the farmers went to planting every square inch, and my little line of tree's just isn't enough. Housiing development less than a quarter mile to the east, most of the farmers have sold off the outer rim of land around the block, in 2-acre plots, so have a ring of house's around farm land in the middle of the block.
School system says it's short on money, but in the last 10 years, hundred's of new house's in developments are now bringing in $2,000 to $3,000 each in property tax, where it was $30-$40 an acre before it was developed. Less kids in the school system now than when I was in in the 60's. Use to walk down the side of the road after school carrying our shotguns over our shoulders, walking home, or from one cornfield to another. Police use to wave. I'd be afraid of what might happen if one of my boys tried to do that today. Sure hope that my boys remember these as the good old days. gypsyman
 

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This summer I took a road trip. First I went to Tennessee, where I grew up. The little old farm house we lived in, out in the middle of the cow pastures, is gone. So are the cow pastures. My buddy Larry was with me. He talked about how he used to walk across the cow pasture to get from his house to mine. Now its all million dollar houses and streets. The house my folks now live in sits where I used to hunt Pheasant, and rabbit. When my Grandma died I wanted to buy her farm, I asked mom to wait till I could get the money together, but no she wanted the money RIGHT NOW, least that's how dad explains it. She sold it to a developer, and got screwed on the deal. Now there is subdivisions on all the old tobacco fields. The wooded hilly half was divided into one and two acre lots, with bigger homes put up there amongst the Oaks, Hickory, Walnut, and Poplar trees. My one brother that does hunt, drives to wildlife refuges to hunt. Or hunts in the wooded area of the Interstate Cloverleafs, with a bow. He usually gets one or two bucks out of there a year.

Then I went to Alamogordo, New Mexico. Where my wife had grown up, and where we lived in her Dad's house ( the house she grew up in) shortly after we got married. The house had been on the edge of town then. We could get on our horses and ride right out into the Sacramento mountains. Nothing but dessert between the house and the trails. Today there is solid houses, with little space between them, all the way up into the foot hills. The little house we lived in is now considered the old part of town, and is being torn down to go commercial. No one wants a little three bedroom one bath house anymore, made of CBS construction. The new houses are all brick.

Now for where I live. When we bought 20 years ago, we were on the edge of wilderness. The Alaska Oil Pipeline runs right at the edge of my property. I could get on a 4-wheeler or snow machine and got for miles. Now within the last two years, there are subdivisions all behind us. I have five acres here and am totally surrounded by small lots with a big house on each one. A developer bought the homestead land directly behind my place and built houses right next to the pipeline easement. Now those folks are fencing off their property, including the pipeline easement, and restricting access. So I now have to ride down streets to get out of the residential area and to the trails, or trailer out. Beginning to have trouble with little dogs running loose. Coming over and chasing the ducks and chickens I raise every year. And house cats hunting the birds as well. I just quietly follow the three Ss and let it go.
 
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