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Installing A Timney Trigger in a US M1917 Sporter.

In the instructions, Timney says that some reciever metal may need to be removed to properly fit the trigger. The area in question is about 1/4" behind the sear slot. It is a gentle radius and looks like it needs to be made more like a 90 degree corner in order to allow the Tinmey trigger to seat properly.

OK, I don't have my garage set up properly yet. I can secure the gun properly but I only have small files, a couple of hand drills, some really good bits, the dreaded Dremel tool and enough motivation to be dangerous.
Any suggestions on how to approach this without buggering up the reciever?

I'd rather do the work myself. A gunsmith is a last resort. The gunsmiths around here have a 3-4 month backlog. Something like this could tie up the gun for years

And now for something completely different:
How does a gunsmith convert a two-stage military trigger to a single stage trigger and still keep the original parts?

Thanks
ZM
 

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Timney trigger ?

Zeke,

I have installed a few Timneys in my Mod. 70 Winchesters, and had to do the same thing to the sear openings in the receivers. It's nice to be able to clamp the action securely, but it is not a necessity.

Use small needle files: the square profile works for me, and be very patient as you work. It's not brain surgery, you can do it! :) Check the clearance of the sear to insure that there is no binding. I'm sure that you are going to like the Timney!!

As for you question on the two stage trigger, I haven't done it, so I can't comment on that. Good shootin' to you sir!
 

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Usyally they remove the 'hump' that constitutes the first part of the 2 stage pull. The trigger shaft must then be bent to reposition the trigger blade in the guard. One can also add material to the sear frame to remove the effect of the hump mentioned already. There used to be devises marketed that clamped around the sear frame which contained a screw which could then be used to adjust out the first picot numps effect.. Limiting sear engagement with a mauser trigger is a dangerous business. Too little and bumping the bolt can releaase the striker.
 
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